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Automatization of Counting Procedures in Children With Dyscalculia (PROCEDYS)

This study is not yet open for participant recruitment.
Verified November 2017 by Hospices Civils de Lyon
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT03354481
First Posted: November 28, 2017
Last Update Posted: November 28, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
University of Lausanne
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Hospices Civils de Lyon
  Purpose
Researchers in numerical cognition usually think that the greatest and most common difficulty in children suffering from dyscalculia is retrieval of arithmetic facts from long-term memory. However, we have recently shown that retrieval might not be the optimum strategy in mental arithmetic. In fact, expert adults would rather solve simple problems such as 3 + 2 by automated and unconscious procedures. Therefore, we hypothesize that children with dyscalculia might not present deficit in retrieval but, instead, in counting procedure automatization. The aim of the current project is to test this challenging position. Through a longitudinal approach, we plan to precisely examine the behavior of children suffering from dyscalculia over a 3-year period. Children will be aged between 8 to 11 years at the beginning of the study and we will precisely observe the evolution of their solution times when they solve simple addition problems involving one-digit numbers. If children with dyscalculia still struggle with simple additions three years, their solution times plotted on the sum of the problems should still follow an exponential function. Indeed, if counting is not automated, difficulties necessarily increase with the progression on the number line or the verbal sequence, hence the exponential function. On the contrary, if counting procedures tend towards automatization, moves along a number line will progressively become as easy at the beginning of the line as at the end, hence the linear function. Importantly, a retrieval model would predict exactly the inverse pattern because, according to this model, the linear function, which is unanimously considered as the hallmark of counting procedures, should progressively be replaced by a non-linear function through practice.

Condition Intervention
Dyscalculia Behavioral: Arithmetic facts solving

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Automatization of Counting Procedures in Children With Dyscalculia

Further study details as provided by Hospices Civils de Lyon:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Response times to solve an informatics task on simple arithmetic facts resolution [ Time Frame: Inclusion ]
    Time between the apparition of the stimuli and the answer. The task contain only addition of one digit numbers

  • Response times to solve an informatics task on simple arithmetic facts resolution [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Time between the apparition of the stimuli and the answer. The task contain only addition

  • Response times to solve an informatics task on simple arithmetic facts resolution [ Time Frame: 24 months ]
    Time between the apparition of the stimuli and the answer. The task contain only addition


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Percentage of correct responses to solve the informatics task on simple arithmetic facts resolution [ Time Frame: 0+ 12 + 24 months ]
  • Result of the digit span memory task [ Time Frame: 0 month ]
  • Processing speed in an informatics task on arrow orientation [ Time Frame: 0 month ]
  • Result of the Corsi block tapping test [ Time Frame: 0 month ]
  • Result of the Tempo Test Rekenen [ Time Frame: 0 month ]
    The Tempo Test Rekenen is used to evaluate arithmetical ability. It consists in solving several operations in a limited time.


Estimated Enrollment: 30
Anticipated Study Start Date: January 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2021
Estimated Primary Completion Date: January 2021 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Behavioral recording of arithmetic and associated information
The experiment will contain several behavioral tasks in which solving time and correct answer will be recorded. The main one will be a computerized task on arithmetic facts. There will also be three additional tasks as described below.
Behavioral: Arithmetic facts solving
The experiment will contain several tasks. The main one will be a computerized task on arithmetic facts where participants will have to solve simple additions. There will also be three additional tasks: a processing speed task where the participant will have to tell the orientation of an arrow as fast as possible, a visuo-spatial task where the participant will have to reproduce a tapping block sequence and an arithmetic task where the participant will try to solve a maximum of operations in a limited time.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   8 Years to 11 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age between 8 and 11 years old
  • Having a dyscalculia as described in the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) V

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Presenting a global intellectual deficit
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03354481


Contacts
Contact: Pr Catherine Thevenot 6 66 89 18 58 ext +33 catherine.thevenot@unil.ch
Contact: Carole VUILLEROT 4 72 12 95 04 ext +33 carole.vuillerot@chu-lyon.fr

Sponsors and Collaborators
Hospices Civils de Lyon
University of Lausanne
  More Information

Responsible Party: Hospices Civils de Lyon
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03354481     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 69HCL17_0651
First Submitted: November 20, 2017
First Posted: November 28, 2017
Last Update Posted: November 28, 2017
Last Verified: November 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Hospices Civils de Lyon:
Dyscalculia

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Dyscalculia
Developmental Disabilities
Learning Disorders
Communication Disorders
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders