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Improving Recovery After Orthopaedic Trauma: Cognitive-Behavioral Based Physical Therapy (CBPT) (CBPT)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03335657
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : November 8, 2017
Last Update Posted : October 8, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium

Brief Summary:
The goal of the CBPT study is to determine the efficacy of the CBPT program for improving outcomes in service members and civilians at-risk for poor outcomes following traumatic lower-extremity injury. Primary outcome is physical function measured through a patient-reported questionnaire and physical performance tests. Secondary outcomes include pain and general health. Tertiary outcome is return to work/duty.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Lower Extremity Injury Other: CBPT Other: Education Treatment Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Following extremity injury, referral (and direct access) to physical therapy (PT) is considered standard of care. And, while PT strategies are commonly impairment focused, clinicians across multiple subspecialties of physical therapy recognize the importance of addressing pain and pain-related psychosocial factors as strong predictors of chronic pain as well as long-term physical and psychological disability.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions have documented positive influence on psychosocial factors in patients with chronic pain. CBT-based self-management programs have also demonstrated improvement in patient outcomes and the adoption of a physically active lifestyle, as well as improvement in fear-avoidance beliefs and self-efficacy, in various populations with chronic conditions. These evidence-based CBT and self-management strategies provide the basis for the study intervention.

The proposed project will conduct a multi-center, randomized controlled trial to determine the efficacy of the CBPT program in patients at-risk for poor outcomes following traumatic lower-extremity injury. Central hypothesis is that delivery of CBPT by physical therapists over the telephone will improve outcomes, through reductions in pain catastrophizing and fear of movement and improvement in pain self-efficacy. The investigators propose a large, rigorous evaluation of the CBPT program in patients with lower extremity trauma with the goal of engaging civilians and service members in their own care and improving pain and functional outcomes.

Specific Aim 1 To determine the efficacy of the CBPT program for improving outcomes in service members and civilians at-risk for poor outcomes following traumatic lower-extremity injury. Primary outcome is physical function measured through a patient-reported questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include physical performance tests, pain and general health. Tertiary outcome is return to work/duty.

Specific Aim 2 To determine whether changes in the intermediary outcomes of pain catastrophizing, fear of movement, and self-efficacy at 6 months are associated with improvement in outcomes 12 months after hospital discharge.

Specific Aim 3 To determine whether subgroups of patients are more likely to benefit from the CBPT program.

Specific Aim 4 To examine the value of CBPT relative to Education using Markov decision-analysis.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 633 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Improving Recovery After Orthopaedic Trauma: Cognitive-Behavioral Based Physical Therapy (CBPT)
Actual Study Start Date : July 18, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : July 18, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : July 18, 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: CBPT Treatment
The CBPT intervention delivers a patient-oriented cognitive-behavioral self-management program to improve physical function and reduce pain, through reductions in pain catastrophizing and fear of movement and increases in self-efficacy. The program consists of six weekly telephone sessions with a trained physical therapist. Sessions cover an introduction and rationale for treatment in addition to techniques such as deep breathing, graded activity plan and goal-setting, distraction techniques, automatic thoughts, coping self-statements, being present-minded, and relapse prevention and symptom management plans. At the end of the 6th week, patients will build individualized recovery plans with selected strategies and details on frequency of practice.
Other: CBPT
The CBPT program focuses on a patient-oriented cognitive-behavioral self-management approach to improve physical function and reduce pain, through reductions in pain catastrophizing and fear of movement and increases in self-efficacy.

Placebo Comparator: Education Treatment
The education program provides a postoperative recovery and is based on education that would typically be provided by a treating physician or a physical therapist in an outpatient setting. The education program is matched to the CBPT treatment in terms of session frequency and contact with the study therapist. The therapist will call weekly to check in with the patient and encourage him/her to read the manual. Manuals contain educational information on injury patterns and symptoms, stress and recovery, benefits of physical therapy, and importance of daily exercise, and ways to promote healing. Education on sleep hygiene, energy management, healthy eating, and preventing future injury are also provided.
Other: Education Treatment
Participants receiving the education control arm are receiving a placebo intervention to control for the attention of the interventionist. They will receive standardized educational material addressing recovery from orthopaedic trauma.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Physical Function- self-reported capability to carry out activities [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Physical Function measured through Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS)/ Physical Function (short form) domain to assess one's ability to carry out activities that require a combination of skills, often within a social context. This instrument has five response options ranging in value from one to five for each question. The total raw score is the sum of values of the response for each question The highest possible raw score is 40 which represents the worse outcome. The lowest possible score is 8 and it represents the better outcome.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Pain [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Measured through Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS)/ Pain Intensity (short form) Domain at 12-months following hospital discharge. This tool has five response options ranging in value from one to five for each question. The total raw score is the sum of values of the response for each question The highest possible raw score is 15 which represents the worse outcome. The lowest possible score is 3 and it represents the better outcome.

  2. General Health [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    General Health measured through Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS)/ General Health Domain at 12-months following hospital discharge.This instrument has five response options ranging in value from one to five for each question. The total raw score is the sum of values of the response for each question The highest possible raw score is 50 which represents the better outcome. The lowest possible score is 10 and it represents the worse outcome.

  3. Physical Function- Balance and Agility [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Balance and Agility measured through the Four Square Step test. Each individual will have time scores based on performance. Higher scores represent worse outcomes.

  4. Physical Function- Mobility and Power [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Mobility and Power measured through the Timed Stair Ascent test. Each individual will have time scores based on performance. Higher scores represent worse outcomes.

  5. Physical Function-Leg Strength, Endurance, and Mobility [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Leg Strength, Endurance, and Mobility measured through the Sit to Stand Five Times

  6. Physical Function- Gait Speed [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Gait Speed measured through 10-Meter Walk test. Each individual will have time scores


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Return to work/duty [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Measured through the rate of return to work/duty 6 months post discharge



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 60 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  1. Ages 18-60 yrs inclusive
  2. Patients with at least one acute orthopaedic injury to the lower extremities or pelvis/acetabulum (determination based on information available at the time of enrollment).
  3. Injury resulting from a moderate to high energy force (e.g. motor vehicle or motorcycle crash, fall > 10 ft, gun shot, blunt trauma)
  4. Patients receiving operative fixation for one or more acute orthopaedic injuries at a participating hospital. Patients should be recruited at the time of primary injury, not revision or complication surgery
  5. Presence of psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes (defined as a score greater than 30 on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) or a score equal to or greater than 39 on the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) or a score equal to or less than 40 on the Pain Self Efficacy Scale (PSES)). These risk factors will be identified between 2 and 8 weeks after hospital discharge.

Exclusion criteria:

  1. Non-English speaking
  2. Patients who are unable to start the program within 12 weeks of discharge from hospital because of multiple readmission, admission to a rehabilitation facility, or other extenuating circumstances
  3. Patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), as evidenced by intracranial hemorrhage present on admission CT. If no CT performed, patient assumed not to have moderate or severe TBI
  4. Patients with major amputations of the upper or lower extremities (great toe, thumb, or proximal to the wrist or ankle)
  5. Patients who require a Legally Authorized Representative (as defined by an inability to answer the "Evaluation of Give Consent" questions)
  6. Patients non-ambulatory pre-injury or due to an associated spinal cord injury
  7. History of dementia or Alzheimer's disease based on medical record or patient self-report
  8. History of neurological disorder, disease or event, resulting in prior cognitive and/or physical impairment, such as prior TBI or stroke based on medical record or patient self-report
  9. Presence of schizophrenia or other psychotic disorder based on medical record or patient self-report
  10. Current alcohol and/or drug addiction based on medical record or patient self-report
  11. Severe problems with maintaining follow-up expected (e.g. patients who are incarcerated or homeless)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03335657


Locations
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United States, Florida
Florida Orthopaedic Institute
Tampa, Florida, United States, 33606
United States, Indiana
Methodist Hospital
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, 46202
United States, Maryland
University of Maryland, R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center
Baltimore, Maryland, United States, 20742
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Bethesda, Maryland, United States, 20889
United States, North Carolina
Carolinas Medical Center
Charlotte, North Carolina, United States, 28203
United States, Tennessee
Vanderbilt Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee, United States, 37232
United States, Texas
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School
Houston, Texas, United States, 78229
San Antonio Military Medical Center
San Antonio, Texas, United States, 78434
Sponsors and Collaborators
Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Kristin Swygert, PhD Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Study Director: Katherine Frey, PhD Johns Hopkins University
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Major Extremity Trauma Research Consortium
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03335657    
Other Study ID Numbers: W81XWH-16-2-0060
First Posted: November 8, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 8, 2020
Last Verified: October 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No