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Trial record 15 of 37 for:    erectile dysfunction | "Erectile Dysfunction" AND "Erectile Dysfunction" | shock wave

Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Three Protocols Usin Li-ESWT for Erectile Dysfunction

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03308409
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : October 12, 2017
Last Update Posted : May 21, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Boston Medical Group

Brief Summary:
The patients with primary erectile dysfunction (IIEF-EF <26 points), will be randomly assigned to three shockwave treatment protocols: Protocol 1 six sessions, one per week; Protocol 2, six initial sessions, one per week, followed by monthly maintenance sessions (every 4 weeks) for five months; Protocol 3, six monthly sessions. The EHS and IIEF-EF scores will be compared as well as the possible adverse events from the therapy upon beginning and completing the treatment and at the 3-month and 6-month follow-ups. Self-esteem and quality of life will also be evaluated using the SEAR scale.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Erectile Dysfunction Other: Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT) Not Applicable

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 279 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Care Provider)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Clinical Randomized Multicentric Trial to Evaluate the Comparative Effectiveness and Safety of Three Protocols Using Low-intensity Shock Waves for the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction
Actual Study Start Date : August 1, 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : January 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : August 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Protocol 1
Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT): Six sessions, one per week, with 3000 pulses at 0.20 mj/mm2, at a frequency of 4Hz. At all of the shockwave sessions, 2000 pulses will be distributed to the body of the penis and 1000 pulses will be applied to the base.
Other: Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT)
Low-intensity shock waves are acoustic wavelengths which are transmitted continuously at a frequency between 16 and 20 megahertz for under 10 microseconds. They generate a pressure pulse and transport energy as they propagate through a medium. Three different methods can be used to generate this type of wave: electro-hydraulics, electro-magnetics and piezoelectricity. Regardless of the method, when the shock waves are applied to an organ they interact with the deep tissue. This causes stress and small mechanical traumas, activating the release of angiogenic factors which induce new vascularization of the affected tissue, thereby improving blood flow.

Experimental: Protocol 2
Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT): Six initial sessions, one per week, with 3000 pulses at 0.20 mj/mm2, at a frequency of 4Hz for six weeks, followed by monthly maintenance sessions (every 4 weeks) for five months. At all of the shockwave sessions, 2000 pulses will be distributed to the body of the penis and 1000 pulses will be applied to the base.
Other: Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT)
Low-intensity shock waves are acoustic wavelengths which are transmitted continuously at a frequency between 16 and 20 megahertz for under 10 microseconds. They generate a pressure pulse and transport energy as they propagate through a medium. Three different methods can be used to generate this type of wave: electro-hydraulics, electro-magnetics and piezoelectricity. Regardless of the method, when the shock waves are applied to an organ they interact with the deep tissue. This causes stress and small mechanical traumas, activating the release of angiogenic factors which induce new vascularization of the affected tissue, thereby improving blood flow.

Experimental: Protocol 3
Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT): Six monthly sessions in which 3000 pulses will be applied at 0.20 mj/mm2, at a frequency of 4Hz, with 2000 pulses distributed to the body of the penis and 1000 pulses applied to the base
Other: Low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy (Li-ESWT)
Low-intensity shock waves are acoustic wavelengths which are transmitted continuously at a frequency between 16 and 20 megahertz for under 10 microseconds. They generate a pressure pulse and transport energy as they propagate through a medium. Three different methods can be used to generate this type of wave: electro-hydraulics, electro-magnetics and piezoelectricity. Regardless of the method, when the shock waves are applied to an organ they interact with the deep tissue. This causes stress and small mechanical traumas, activating the release of angiogenic factors which induce new vascularization of the affected tissue, thereby improving blood flow.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. IIEF-EF score 6 months after completing the treatment [ Time Frame: 6 month follow-ups ]
    This is a highly sensitive and specific scale for detecting changes in erectile function in response to treatment. The degree of dysfunction is scored on a range of 0 to 30 points on the Erectile Functioning domain (questions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 15). The categories are: severe between 0 and 10, moderate between 11 and 16, mild-to-moderate between 17 and 21, mild between 22 and 25, and no ED between 26 and 30.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Erection Hardness Score [ Time Frame: 3-month and 6-month follow-ups ]
    The EHS has a single Likert scale: 0 = Penis does not increase in size; 1= the penis increases in size but is not hard; 2 = the penis is hard but not hard enough for penetration; 3 = the penis is hard enough for penetration but not completely hard; 4 = the penis is completely hard and fully rigid

  2. Clinical improvement [ Time Frame: 6-month follow-ups ]
    For patients with moderate ED, a 5-point increase in the IIEF-EF score is considered improvement. For patients with mild ED a 2-point increase on this scale is considered improvement. And for those with severe ED a 7-point change is considered improvement.

  3. Number of satisfactory relations [ Time Frame: 3-month and 6-month follow-ups ]
    According to the patient's journal records. For the purpose of this study, satisfactory relations are defined as the increase in rigidity and duration of the erection as evaluated by the patient and his partner. For patients who were not able to penetrate before treatment, satisfactory relations will include not only an increase in rigidity and duration of the erection but also the ability to penetrate.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men over 18 years of age
  • Presence of ED for more than 3 months in over 50% of sexual intercourses.
  • Baseline ED domain score under 26 on the IIEF-15 EF domain.
  • Patient agrees to participate in the trial by providing signed informed consent.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • EHS score of 4.
  • Patients with an INR over 3.
  • Patients with sickle-cell anemia.
  • Patients with clinical suspicion of hypogonadism (AMS over 36).
  • Endocrine diseases that present with ED, such as acromegaly, gigantism, Addison's disease, hyperprolactinemia, androgen deficiency.
  • Active vesicular, prostrate or colon cancer.
  • Radical prostatectomy or other radical pelvic surgery.
  • History of pelvic radiation therapy.
  • Patients with ED of psychological origin.
  • Spinal cord injury or other neurological diseases associated with ED.
  • Anatomical penile dysfunction, penile implant.
  • Patients with active infections or lesions on the penis or pubic area.
  • Patients with ED secondary to drug therapy (antiandrogen therapy, alpha blockers for BPH, use of corticosteroids, medication for Parkinson's disease, antipsychotics).
  • Abuse of psychoactive substances.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03308409


Contacts
Contact: José Saffon, Doctor 3208899777 ext 104 jpsaffon@bostonmedical.com.co

Locations
Brazil
Boston Medical Group Not yet recruiting
São Paulo, Brazil
Contact: Rafael Freitas       rafaelfreitasconfirmar@gmail.com   
Colombia
Boston Medical Group Colombia Recruiting
Bogotá, Cundinamarca, Colombia, 11022
Contact: Carolina Sandoval    57 3208899777    csandoval@bostonmedical.com.co   
Mexico
Boston Medical Group Not yet recruiting
Mexico City, Mexico
Contact: Jorge Barba       jbarba@bostonmedical.com.mx   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Boston Medical Group

Responsible Party: Boston Medical Group
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03308409     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: BMGC-3
First Posted: October 12, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 21, 2018
Last Verified: May 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Erectile Dysfunction
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological
Genital Diseases, Male
Sexual Dysfunctions, Psychological
Mental Disorders