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Nanodisk-MS Assay for the Diagnosis of Active Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Hospitalized Patients

This study is not yet open for participant recruitment.
Verified September 2017 by Grace Lui, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT03271567
First Posted: September 4, 2017
Last Update Posted: September 8, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong
Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Grace Lui, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  Purpose
Diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis are often delayed in hospitalized patients, leading to worse outcomes. Rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis currently relies on microscopy and molecular techniques, which have limitations including low sensitivity and high cost.Highly sensitive diagnostic technique is needed for more accurate rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis to aid earlier initiation of antituberculous therapy. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigens in the bloodstream can potentially allow early diagnosis of tuberculosis. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a novel assay using nanotechnology to detect MTB antigens in patients admitted to hospital with suspected pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Blood will be taken from eligible patients, and will be sent to the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, for detection of 10-kDa culture filtrate protein (CFP-10) and the 6 kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6), two antigens specific for MTB, using the Nanodisk-MS assay. Investigations, including microscopy, culture, MTB polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and imaging, will be performed for diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnostic performance of Nanodisk-mass spectrometry (MS) assay will be evaluated.

Condition Intervention
Active Tuberculosis Tuberculosis, Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Diagnostic Test: Nanodisk-MS assay

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Detection of Circulating Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Antigen Peptides for the Diagnosis of Active Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis in Hospitalized Patients

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Grace Lui, Chinese University of Hong Kong:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Diagnostic test correlation [ Time Frame: One year from the date of recruitment ]
    Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value, will be calculated to determine accuracy of Nanodisk-MS assay, in diagnosing "culture-positive" and "culture-negative" pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary TB.


Estimated Enrollment: 100
Anticipated Study Start Date: October 1, 2017
Estimated Study Completion Date: February 28, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date: August 31, 2018 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Intervention Details:
    Diagnostic Test: Nanodisk-MS assay
    Nanodisk-MS assay is a recently reported novel assay for quantitative detection of various MTB antigen peptides, using nanotechnology and mass spectrometry that showed remarkable sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing active pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. This assay detected MTB-specific antigens, CFP-10 and ESAT-6, in patients' serum samples.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Patients admitted to the Prince of Wales Hospital and the Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital with suspected pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB will be identified by Infectious Diseases physician and recruited.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adult patients aged 18 or above,
  • Assessed by an Infectious Diseases physician to have clinical and/or radiological suspicion of pulmonary and/or extrapulmonary TB.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Refusal to consent from patients or next of kins for incompetent patients.
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03271567


Contacts
Contact: Yee Kwan Rity Wong +852 35053376 ritywong@cuhk.edu.hk

Sponsors and Collaborators
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong
Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Chung Yan Grace Lui Chinese University of Hong Kong
  More Information

Publications:
Responsible Party: Grace Lui, Associate consultant, Chinese University of Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03271567     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: TB Protocol ver.1
First Submitted: September 1, 2017
First Posted: September 4, 2017
Last Update Posted: September 8, 2017
Last Verified: September 2017

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Mycobacterium Infections
Actinomycetales Infections
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections
Bacterial Infections
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Respiratory Tract Infections