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Analgesia-first Minimal Sedation for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Early Antihypertensive Treatment (ASSICHH)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03207100
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : July 2, 2017
Last Update Posted : November 25, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing
Qilu Hospital of Shandong University
The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College
First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University
Second Affiliated Hospital of Third Military Medical University
Henan Provincial People's Hospital
The Second Hospital University of South China
Shenzhen Second People's Hospital
People's Hospital of Guangxi
Department of Biostatistics, Southern Medical University
LanZhou University
The First Affiliated Hospital of HuNan University of Medicine
Guangdong 999 Brain Hospital
Maoming People's Hospital
The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University
Zhongshan People's Hospital, Guangdong, China
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Hong Yang, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University

Brief Summary:
This study evaluates safety and efficacy of analgesia-first minimal sedation as an early antihypertensive treatment for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. The analgesia-first minimal sedation strategy relies on the remifentanil-mediated alleviation of pain-induced stress response and the antisympathetic activity of dexmedetomidine to restore the elevated blood pressure to normal level in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. This strategy allows rapid stabilization of blood pressure, and its use as a pre-treatment for patients on mechanical ventilation prior to painful procedures reduces blood pressure variability and thereby results in etiologic treatment. It is more effective in blood pressure control than conventional symptomatic antihypertensive treatment, reduces the incidence of early hematoma expansion and improves prognosis, ,lowers healthcare workers workload, increases patient adherence, and improves healthcare worker satisfaction.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Early Systolic Blood Pressure Control Rate Hematoma Growth Blood Pressure Variability Healthcare Worker Satisfaction Duration of ICU Treatment and Mechanical Ventilation Combination Product: Analgesia-first minimal sedation Combination Product: Antihypertensive treatment Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is hemorrhage in the brain parenchyma caused by non-traumatic spontaneous rupture of cerebral artery, arteriole, vein and capillary in adults. ICH is a common problem, with subarachnoid hemorrhage. About 90% ICH patients have increased blood pressure (BP) that usually occurs immediately after disease onset. BP elevation in the acute phase of ICH is associated with poor prognosis, and its mechanism of action includes the local increase of initial hemorrhage, early hematoma expansion at hemorrhagic sites, the increased risk of early recurrent hemorrhage, serious cerebral edema, and recurrent stroke, this affects the most within the few hours following the onset of the disease. The current American Heart Association guidelines recommended early antihypertensive treatment and suggested that rapid decrease of BP to 140 mmHg is safe in ICH patients with no obvious antihypertensive contraindications. However, the significant differences between large studies conducted in recent years have led to great controversy on the effect of early antihypertensive treatment in acute ICH and disease prognosis. A meta-analysis of early antihypertensive treatment for ICH showed that differences in early BP control rate and BP increase variability are also the major causes of inconsistency between these studies. There is currently no consensus on the best antihypertensive regimen as it is difficult to reach the optimal BP level timely. Some studies have shown that stress response, pain, ICP increase and pre-onset BP elevation are factors that cause acute BP increase in ICH patients. In particular, restlessness, sleep deprivation, and stress due to intolerable pain can lead to dramatic BP and intracranial pressure (ICP) increases, further lead to secondary intracerebral hematoma expansion and subsequently cause neurologic degeneration and cerebral tissue damage. Therefore, the primary principles of ICH acute BP increase treatment are to keep quiet, restore BP to normal level, stably reduce BP, decrease BP variability, lower the chance of recurrent hemorrhage, and thereby improve long-term prognosis. Traditional antihypertensive treatment can only resolve the issue of BP elevation but not the root cause of disease. Analgesia and sedation is a critical component of and a global consensus in the clinical management of ICH patients. Remifentanil is a fentanyl μ-type opioid receptor agonist with strong and fast-acting analgesic effects, does not induce ICP elevation and can alleviate pain induced by sputum aspiration, body turning and back clapping in severe patients. A randomized trial on patients with craniocerebral injury has indicated that a remifentanil-based sedation strategy can significantly reduce the amount of sedative used and shorten the time of mechanical ventilation without affecting the functional assessment of the nervous system. Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist that inhibits sympathetic activity by activating the pre-synaptic α2-receptor in the locus coeruleus, which in turn reduces norepinephrine release, that only slightly affects consciousness and breathing and helps patients with craniocerebral injury stay conscious while under sedation, allowing real-time functional assessment of the nervous system. Therefore, the research group developed a treatment strategy in which sufficient analgesia is applied in combination with a minimal sedation program as an effective and safe early an- tihypertensive treatment.We hypothesize that applying sufficient analgesia in combination with a minimal sedation program will involve the use of remifentanil for pain relief and dexmedetomidine for antisympathetic activity to restore elevated BP to normal levels in patients with spontaneous ICH, and we further hypothesize that this strategy will be more effective than conventional symptomatic antihypertensive treatment for controlling BP.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 330 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Subjects are grouped into the analgesia-first minimal sedation group (experimental group) or antihypertensive drug treatment group (control group) using the central randomization system upon enrollment. Antihypertensive intervention is performed on the subjects in accordance to the protocol of each group.
Masking: Single (Participant)
Masking Description: This study uses a single-blinded design in which only the investigators and not the subjects know the method of intervention.
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Clinical Study of the Safety and Efficacy of Analgesia-first Minimal Sedation as an Early Antihypertensive Treatment for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage
Actual Study Start Date : December 6, 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 30, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : July 30, 2021


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Analgesia-first minimal sedation group
Using analgesia-first minimal sedation strategy to implement antihypertensive therapy.
Combination Product: Analgesia-first minimal sedation
Remifentanil will be administered by IV infusion and maintained at a dose of 0.025 μg/kg/min in non-mechanically ventilated patients and a dose of 0.05 μg/kg/min in mechanically ventilated patients. BP will be measured after 10 min of continuous infusion.If systolic BP is still ≥ 140 mmHg, then dexmedetomidine will be applied using an infusion pump at a dose of 0.2 μg/kg/h. BP will be measured again after 15 min of continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine. If systolic BP is still ≥ 140 mmHg, the dose of dexmedetomidine can be increased 0.1 μg/kg/h to the maximum of 0.6 μg/kg/h.If the maximum dose of dexmedetomidine does not lower blood pressure, use routine blood pressure reduction programs in each center to reduce blood pressure to the target range. Mechanically ventilated patients will be given a rapid remifentanil (0.5 μg/kg) infusion to reduce procedure-related pain.

Active Comparator: Antihypertensive drug treatment group
Using routine antihypertensive drugs to implement antihypertensive therapy.
Combination Product: Antihypertensive treatment
Routine antihypertensive treatment will be performed in accordance with the protocol of each respective research center. Urapidil, nicardipine, and labetalol will be used in this group. Urapidil will be used as follows: a slow IV injection of 10-15 mg and then IV pumping for maintenance at an initial rate of 2 mg/min, adjusted according to BP to a maximum of 9 mg/min. Nicardipine will be used as follows: IV pumping at 0.5μg/kg/min adjusted according to BP to a maximum of 6μg/kg/min. Labetalol will be used as follows: IV infusion for maintenance at 1-4 mg/min until the aim is reached.The mechanically ventilated patients in the control group will be administered a rapid physiological saline infusion as a controlled pretreatment.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Systolic BP control rate at 1h post-treatment initiation [ Time Frame: 1h post-treatment initiation ]
    The number of patients who systolic BP decreased to <140 mmHg at 1h post-treatment initiation compared to the total number of each group.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Hematoma growth at 24 h [ Time Frame: 24h of treatment ]
    Head CT re-examination is required for the subjects after 24h of treatment.Hematoma expansion is defined as V2-V1≥12.5 cm³ or (V2-V1)/V1>33% (V1 and V2 represent the hematoma volume in the two CT scans, respectively).

  2. BP variability [ Time Frame: Up to 7 days ]
    BPs are also recorded every hour from hour 2 to 24 post-treatment, and monitored on d2-d7 of treatment of recorded every 6h daily (4 times per day); BP Coefficient of Variation (CV) = (standard deviation of BP/mean of systolic BP).

  3. Neurologic function [ Time Frame: Up to 7 days ]
    Assessed once every morning using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), Glasgow Coma Scale scores (GCS), Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS), Nonverbal Adult Pain Assessment Scale (NVPS), Reaction Level Scale (RLS).

  4. Duration of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation [ Time Frame: Up to 7 days ]
    Duration of ICU treatment and mechanical ventilation

  5. Healthcare worker satisfaction [ Time Frame: 7 day or discharge from ICU (if patients discharge from ICU in 7 days) ]
    Questionnaire is designed based on the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, with a parameter for self-assessed workload.

  6. cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI) [ Time Frame: Up to 7 days and around sputum aspiration ]
    Assess changes in the TOI after sputum aspiration in mechanical ventilation patients

  7. 28-day mortality and disability rate [ Time Frame: 28 days ]
    Using a binary indicator of the patient's death or dependency at 28 days, with dependency being defined by a score of 3 to 5 on the modified Rankin Score (mRS)

  8. 90-day mortality and disability rate [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
    Using a binary indicator of the patient's death or dependency at 90 days, with dependency being defined by a score of 3 to 5 on the modified Rankin Score (mRS)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Definitive diagnosis of ICH-induced acute brain injury by CT;
  2. Systolic BP ≥150 mmHg for at least twice;
  3. >18 years old;
  4. Feasible for emergency antihypertensive treatment and real-time BP monitoring;
  5. Disease onset is within 24h;
  6. ICU or stroke unit admission within 24h.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Subject has contraindications for emergency intensified antihypertensive treatment;
  2. Intracranial hemorrhage secondary to intracranial tumor, recent trauma, cerebral infarction and thrombolytic therapy;
  3. History of ischemic stroke within 30 days before disease onset;
  4. Clinical or imaging examination reveals an expected high mortality in subject within the next 24h;
  5. Presence of dementia or significant post-stroke disability;
  6. Coagulation disorder caused by drugs or hematologic diseases;
  7. Allergy to opioids;
  8. Interference test result, assessment and follow-up of comorbidity;
  9. Presence of sinus arrest, borderline rhythm, grade II and above atrioventricular block and malignant arrhythmia;
  10. Individual is pregnant or lactating;
  11. Currently participating in other drug studies or clinical trials;
  12. Subject or guardian is unwilling to provide his/her informed consent form, or subject is highly unable to persist with the study and follow-up;
  13. Subject's participation in the study will increase his/her study-related risk, and other reasons that make the subject unsuitable for the study as determined by the investigator.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03207100


Contacts
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Contact: Rui Dong, MMed +86-15622176026 dongrui_0419@163.com

Locations
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China, Beijing
Xuanwu Hospital Capital Medical University Not yet recruiting
Beijing, Beijing, China, 100053
Contact: Wen-Jin Chen    +86-13501276587      
Contact: Meng Qi    +86-15201042155      
China, Chongqing
Xinqiao Hospital of Army Medical University Completed
Chongqing, Chongqing, China, 400037
China, Gansu
The First Hospital of Lanzhou University Recruiting
Lanzhou, Gansu, China, 730000
Contact: Bin Li    +86-13739319065    lynd0001@163.com   
Contact: Qiming Chen    +86-13893180848    813558875@163.com   
China, Guangdong
Guangdong 999 Brain Hospital Recruiting
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510000
Contact: Zhanfu Li       lzhp1@163.com   
The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University Recruiting
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510630
Contact: Hong Yang, Dr    +86-13512756677    13512756677@163.com   
Contact: Rui Dong, MMed    +86-15622176026    dongrui_0419@163.com   
The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University Recruiting
Guangzhou, Guangdong, China, 510900
Contact: Guohua Liu    +86-13724033300      
MaoMing People's Hospital Recruiting
Maoming, Guangdong, China, 525000
Contact: Yumei Xiao    +86-18666818212      
The Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen Not yet recruiting
Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, 518035
Contact: Xian-Jian Huang, Dr    +86-13556865188    ken_1978@163.com   
Contact: Jie-Hua Zhang    +86-13530745863    525428966@qq.com   
Zhongshan People's Hospital Recruiting
Zhongshan, Guangdong, China, 528400
Contact: JianWei Li    +86-13702300133    zssljw@163.com   
China, Guangxi
The People's Hospital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Active, not recruiting
Nanning, Guangxi, China, 530021
China, Henan
Henan Provincial People's Hospital Recruiting
Zhengzhou, Henan, China, 450003
Contact: Guang Feng    +86-18903711799      
Contact: Ming Zhang    +86-18339815699      
China, Hunan
The Second Hospital University of South China Completed
Hengyang, Hunan, China, 421001
The First Affiliated Hospital of HuNan University of Medicine Recruiting
Huaihua, Hunan, China, 418000
Contact: Mingbiao Yang    +86-15115183366    409578094@qq.com   
China, Shandong
Qilu Hospital of Shandong University Recruiting
Qingdao, Shandong, China, 266035
Contact: Qi-Bing Huang    +86-18605310668      
Contact: Ze-Li Zhang    +86-18560083120    13791036664@163.com   
China, Xinjiang
The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University Active, not recruiting
Ürümqi, Xinjiang, China, 830054
China, Yunnan
The First Affiliated Hospital of Kuming Medical University Not yet recruiting
Kunming, Yunnan, China, 650032
Contact: Wang-Bin Xu, PhD    +86-13987679258    xwbyn@126.com   
Contact: Yu Su, M.Med    +86-13888168532      
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hong Yang
Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing
Qilu Hospital of Shandong University
The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College
First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University
Second Affiliated Hospital of Third Military Medical University
Henan Provincial People's Hospital
The Second Hospital University of South China
Shenzhen Second People's Hospital
People's Hospital of Guangxi
Department of Biostatistics, Southern Medical University
LanZhou University
The First Affiliated Hospital of HuNan University of Medicine
Guangdong 999 Brain Hospital
Maoming People's Hospital
The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University
Zhongshan People's Hospital, Guangdong, China
Investigators
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Study Chair: Wen-Jin Chen Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing
Study Chair: Hong Yang, Dr The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University
Publications of Results:

Other Publications:

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Hong Yang, Doctor of Medicine (M.D.);Associate Senior Doctor, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03207100    
Other Study ID Numbers: 201704004
First Posted: July 2, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 25, 2020
Last Verified: November 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Hong Yang, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University:
Intracerebral hemorrhage
Early antihypertensive treatment
Analgesia-first
Sedation
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Hemorrhage
Hematoma
Pathologic Processes
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Antihypertensive Agents