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Trial record 54 of 359 for:    transthyretin

Supplemental Enteral Protein in Critical Illness

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03170401
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : May 31, 2017
Last Update Posted : February 16, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Grant E. O'Keefe, University of Washington

Brief Summary:

The aim of this study is too determine the effect of enteral protein supplementation on biochemical measures of inflammation and protein metabolism in critically ill surgical patients. The investigators will also collect data on important clinical outcomes, including infectious complications, duration of mechanical ventilation and other measures of recovery from critical illness.

Hypothesis: That early supplemental protein will increase serum concentrations of transthyretin at three weeks after the onset of illness or injury. Secondarily, the investigators will test whether supplementation, reduces infectious complications and increases ventilator-free days.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Nutrition Disorder Trauma Critical Illness Dietary Supplement: Protein supplementation Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Critically ill patients are frequently undernourished. The investigator's observations indicate that surgical and trauma patients who require artificial nutrition are likely to be markedly undernourished during the first week of critical illness, will often require intensive and costly support for organ failure, have prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and extended hospitalizations. Nitrogen deficits are typically greater and receive less attention than caloric deficits. In some respects, the focus on avoiding caloric deficits may have missed the mark. A broader consideration of nutrient needs, such as protein, is required. For instance, there are observational data supporting the notion that protein intake is at least as important as caloric intake in promoting recovery in critical illness. Only recently have national guidelines (ASPEN 2016) begun to specifically address protein requirements (1.5 - 2.0 g/kg/day). For a number of years, the approach to these critically ill patients has included weekly measurements of 24 hour urine nitrogen excretion in order to better understand the protein deficits that develop. Based upon physician preference, the investigators can then use enteral protein supplementation to match the urinary nitrogen excretion in order to achieve net "zero" nitrogen balance. With supplemental protein administration, physicians are able to reduce this deficit and in some cases, generate a positive nitrogen balance. However, there are no data to indicate that this approach (which is included as part of the 2016 ASPEN guidelines) improves clinical outcomes. The most obvious mechanism whereby supplemental protein may influence outcomes by providing more metabolic substrate for protein building. Feeding the gut likely creates a more anabolic environment and additional protein may facilitate anabolism. However, it is not known whether protein supplementation improves markers of anabolism and protein synthesis. In this study, the investigators will measure the anabolic effect of supplemental protein by following serum transthyretin concentrations as part of the standard clinical care.The investigators postulate that supplemental protein will attenuate the drop in comparison to no supplemental protein and will hasten the return to normal concentrations.

The proposed study will test whether early, and standardized protein supplementation: (1) Increases protein delivery during the first 2 weeks after injury, (2) increases serum transthyretin concentrations at 3 weeks after injury (3) increases ventilator-free days.

Study aims:

The aim of this study is to determine the effect of enteral protein supplementation on biochemical measures of protein metabolism in critically ill surgical patients. The investigators will also collect data on important clinical outcomes, including infectious complications, duration of mechanical ventilation and other measures of recovery from critical illness. However, this study will not enroll a sufficient number of subjects to adequately test for differences in these clinical end-points.

Hypothesis: That early supplemental protein will, increase serum concentrations of transthyretin at three weeks after injury. Secondarily, the investigators will test whether supplementation reduces infectious complications and increases ventilator-free days.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 500 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Supplemental Enteral Protein in Critical Illness
Actual Study Start Date : November 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2022

Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: no protein supplementation
trauma subjects receiving enteral nutrition without any protein supplementation
Active Comparator: protein supplementation
trauma subjects receiving enteral nutrition with additional protein supplementation
Dietary Supplement: Protein supplementation
half the subjects will receive protein supplementation via enteral feedings and half will not receive the protein supplementation




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Serum concentrations of transthyretin at 3 weeks after injury. [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
    Transthyretin is a circulating biomarker of nutritional status and protein synthesis.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Ventilator-free days. [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
    Ventilator-free days will measured in the standard way and indicate the number of days a subject was alive and not receiving mechanical ventilation during the first 28 days.

  2. Hospital-acquired pneumonia [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
    Pneumonia diagnosed while the patient is in the hospital.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Critically ill adult trauma (blunt and penetrating) victims
  • Other critically ill surgical patients
  • enteral nutrition required during the first 96 hours after injury
  • expected to require nutritional support for at least 1 week

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Significant chronic organ failure,
  • severe malnutrition pre-existing prior to ICU admission
  • not expected to survive from their traumatic injuries.
  • intestinal discontinuity
  • short bowel syndrome
  • bowel obstruction
  • enterocutaneous fistula
  • intestinal ischemia
  • massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage
  • inability to obtain enteral access.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03170401


Contacts
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Contact: Laura Hennessy, RN 2063-744-7723 hennessy@uw.edu

Locations
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United States, Washington
Harborview Medical Center Recruiting
Seattle, Washington, United States, 98104
Contact: Laura Hennessy, RN    206-744-7723    hennessy@uw.edu   
Principal Investigator: Grant O'Keefe, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Washington
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Grant O'Keefe, MD University of Washington

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Responsible Party: Grant E. O'Keefe, Professor of Surgery, University of Washington
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03170401     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 52536
First Posted: May 31, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 16, 2018
Last Verified: February 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Critical Illness
Nutrition Disorders
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes