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Trial record 2 of 159 for:    physician coaching

The Impact of Professional Coaching on Early Career Academic Emergency Physicians

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03125330
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : April 24, 2017
Last Update Posted : August 10, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Richard C Winters, Mayo Clinic

Brief Summary:
This research study is designed to answer the question: How does professional coaching impact early career academic emergency medicine physician goal attainment, leadership strengths, well-being, and burnout?

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Development, Human Well-Being Professional Burnout Goals Leadership Professional Role Physician's Role Stress Anxiety Behavioral: Professional coaching Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis found coaching to have significant positive effects on goal attainment, well-being, coping skills, work attitudes, and goal-directed self-regulation. Randomized controlled studies of professional coaching have found significant positive effects in various settings including high school teachers and students, postgraduate students in a major university, and executives in the commercial, government, and education sectors.

Coaching provides the participant focused time with a trained professional who facilitates that participant's self-determined and self-directed problem-solving and change. Coaching helps the participant "get on the balcony" away from the action on the "dance floor" to see things from a different and broader perspective and, in doing so, enriches the participant's ability to generate options, challenge biases, understand the effects of emotions, and consider uncertainty.

This study also establishes the level of adult development of academic faculty and creates an initial qualitative dataset for further longitudinal study and theory generation for physician well-being, burnout, leadership strengths, and goal attainment.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 90 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: The Impact of Professional Coaching on Early Career Academic Emergency Physician Well-Being, Burnout, Leadership Strengths, and Goal Attainment: A Pilot Randomized, Controlled Trial
Actual Study Start Date : June 1, 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : April 2019

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: One-to-One Coaching

Participants randomized to One-to-One Coaching meet for an initial 2-hour coaching session, followed by seven 1-hour coaching sessions every 3-weeks. These eight sessions take place over the course of 6 months.

Additional requirements for One-to-One Coaching:

  • Complete a 30-minute online assessment of goal attainment, well-being, burnout, and leadership strengths (a) at study enrollment, (b) at 6-months after study enrollment, and (c) 12-months following study enrollment.
  • Complete a 15-minute VIA Character Strengths Test online prior to One-to-One Coaching.
  • Following the completion of the final coaching session, participants are interviewed by a con-investigator by phone call to assess the experience of coaching.

Each coaching session will be recorded, transcribed, anonymized, and analyzed to identify common themes.

Behavioral: Professional coaching
Professional coaching is provided by the Principal Investigator via video conference.
Other Name: Coaching

Active Comparator: Group Coaching

Participants meet for 90-minutes each month for 6 months for facilitated professional coaching with a group of colleagues.

Additional requirements:

  • Complete a 30-minute online assessment of goal attainment, well-being, burnout, and leadership strengths (a) at study enrollment, (b) at 6-months after study enrollment, and (c) 12-months following study enrollment.
  • Complete a 15-minute VIA Character Strengths Test online prior to Group Coaching.
  • Prior to your initial group coaching session, participate in a 75-minute private phone interview with the primary investigator to discuss the how you make decisions and make sense of the world.
  • Following the completion of the final coaching session, participants are interviewed by a con-investigator by phone call to assess the experience of coaching.

Each coaching session will be recorded, transcribed, anonymized, and analyzed to identify common themes.

Behavioral: Professional coaching
Professional coaching is provided by the Principal Investigator via video conference.
Other Name: Coaching

No Intervention: Group Coaching Waitlist

Participants are offered group coaching at the completion of the 12-month study period. Six 90-minute group coaching sessions will occur over the course of six months.

Additional requirements:

• Complete a 30-minute online assessment of goal attainment, well-being, burnout, and leadership strengths (a) at study enrollment (b) and at 6-months after study enrollment.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Goal Setting and Attainment [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    Each participant identifies two professional goals at study onset. For each of the goals, participants respond to the question, "Up to today, how successful have you been in achieving this goal?" and rate their goal attainment on a scale from 0% (no attainment) to 100% (complete attainment). To control for differences between participants in perceived goal attainment difficulty, participants also will rate each goal for perceived difficulty on a 4-point scale ( 1=very easy, 2=somewhat easy, 3=somewhat difficult, 4=very difficult). Goal attainment scores are calculated by multiplying the difficulty rating by the degree of success.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Psychological Well-Being Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    An 18-item survey that measures eudaemonic well-being.

  2. Empowerment at Work Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A 12-item survey that measures a physician's sense of meaning, competence, self-determination, and impact while at work.

  3. Abbreviated Two-Item Maslach Burnout Inventory [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A two-item survey that measures participant burnout.

  4. Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS 21) [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A 21-item self-report questionnaire designed to measure the severity of the core symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress in both clinical and nonclinical scenarios.

  5. Leadership Self-Efficacy Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A 5-item scale of leadership self-efficacy.

  6. Self-Insight Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    An 8-item sub-scale of the Self-reflection and Insight Scale. This scale measures individuals' levels of insight into their thoughts, feelings and behaviors.

  7. Solution-Focused Thinking Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A 12-item scale with three subscales: Problem Disengagement, Goal Orientation, and Resource Activation.

  8. Tolerance for Ambiguity Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    An eight-item assessment that measures tolerance for ambiguity.

  9. Perspective Taking Scale [ Time Frame: 18 months (3 measurements at 6-month intervals) ]
    A 7-item subscale of The Empathy Questionnaire that measures perspective-taking.

  10. Qualitative Summary of Coaching Program [ Time Frame: After 6-month coaching intervention. 18 months ]
    An open-ended interview covering issues such as 1) participant's experience with the coaching process and coach; 2) participant goals; 3) impact on the participant's workplace; 4) impact on participant's personal life; and 5) what the participant plans to do to sustain any changes or learnings.

  11. Subject-Object Interview [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
    A one-time 60 to 75-minute private interview that measures the particpant's order of subject-object development based upon constructive-developmental theory.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion:

  • Emergency physicians
  • Academic appointment of Instructor or Assistant Professor
  • Work greater than 80% of their time in a residency and fellowship program approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), or the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) will be invited to participate in the study.

Exclusion:

  • Mayo Clinic emergency physicians are not eligible for this study.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03125330


Contacts
Contact: Richard C. Winters, MD 507-255-7002 winters.richard@mayo.edu
Contact: Renee Cabalka 507-255-9353 cabalka.renee@mayo.edu

Locations
United States, Minnesota
Mayo Clinic in Rochester Recruiting
Rochester, Minnesota, United States, 55905
Contact: Richard C. Winters, MD    507-255-7002    winters.richard@mayo.edu   
Contact: Erik P. Hess, MD    507-284-7221    hess.erik@mayo.edu   
Principal Investigator: Richard C. Winters, MD, MBA         
Sub-Investigator: Erik P. Hess, MD, MSc         
Sub-Investigator: Ji Yun Kang, Ph.D         
Sub-Investigator: Colin P. West, MD, Ph.D         
Sub-Investigator: Anthony M. Grant, Ph.D         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Mayo Clinic
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Richard C Winters Mayo Clinic

Additional Information:
Publications:
Theeboom, T., B. Beersma, and A.E.M. van Vianen, Does coaching work? A meta-analysis on the effects of coaching on individual level outcomes in an organizational context. The Journal of Positive Psychology, 2013. 9(1): p. 1-18.

Responsible Party: Richard C Winters, MD, Mayo Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03125330     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 16-010192
First Posted: April 24, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 10, 2018
Last Verified: August 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Plan Description: We may make anonymized individual participant data (IPD) available to other researchers. It may be available after the completion of the trial to those who contact the PI directly.

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Richard C Winters, Mayo Clinic:
Coaching
Professional coaching
Emergency physicians
Group coaching
Emergency medicine
Goal attainment
Leadership strengths
Well-being
Burnout
Adult level of development
Instructor
Assistant professor
Academic faculty
Subject-Object Interview

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Emergencies
Burnout, Professional
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes
Occupational Diseases