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A Survey of Attitudes of Experienced Blood Donors

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03102385
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 5, 2017
Last Update Posted : February 25, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
New York Blood Center
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christopher R. France, Ph.D., Ohio University

Brief Summary:
This study examines the effects of a web-based motivational interview on 1) internal motivation to donate blood; 2) donor autonomy, competence and relatedness; and 3) donation intention and behavior. The study also evaluates whether group differences in donation intention and behavior are mediated by autonomy, competence, and relatedness, and in turn, internal motivation.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Blood Donors Behavioral: Motivational Interview Behavioral: Knowledge Interview Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Voluntary blood donation is both important and necessary for the provision of a steady and safe blood supply. With an aging population and increased restrictions on who can donate blood, maintenance of a stable blood supply is essential. Although 38% of the United States population is eligible to donate, only 5% actually does so. Retention of donors is essential to assuring the continuity of a safe blood supply; repeat donors are safer, more cost effective, and less likely to experience adverse reactions. Current recruitment and retention methods may not be sufficient to encourage repeat donations. According to Self-Determination Theory, people are more likely to persist with behaviors that are internally versus externally motivated. Internal motivation is enhanced by supporting an individual's needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. One intervention that has shown early promise as a novel method to enhance internal motivation to donate blood is motivational interviewing. However, implementation of a motivational interviewing intervention is costly and time consuming. Given the time and money required for training and delivery of a motivational interviewing intervention, the current study is designed to test the efficacy of a newly-developed web-based version of a motivational interview. Participants will be randomly assigned to complete either an on-line motivational interview about their blood donation experience or an on-line knowledge interview about blood donation.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 1177 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Participants will be randomly assigned to either (1) complete an on-line motivational interview about their blood donation experience, or (2) complete an on-line knowledge interview about blood donation.
Masking: Single (Participant)
Masking Description: All participants were informed that they would complete an on-line interview regarding blood donation. They were not be told which of the two interviews they were completing.
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: A Survey of Attitudes of Experienced Blood Donors
Actual Study Start Date : April 3, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 1, 2018
Actual Study Completion Date : November 1, 2018

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Motivational Interview
Complete an on-line motivational interview regarding participants' blood donation experience.
Behavioral: Motivational Interview
A web-based computer-tailored intervention that includes open-ended questions, reflective responses, affirmations, and summarizing, as well as informing and advising. Specific topics include 1) individual motivations for giving, 2) the relationship between past donation behavior and the individual's personal goals/values, 3) donation importance and confidence rulers, 4) addressing donor concerns, and 5) summarizing.

Placebo Comparator: Knowledge Interview
Complete an on-line interview regarding participants' general knowledge about blood donation.
Behavioral: Knowledge Interview
A web-based interview that includes open-ended questions regarding blood donation knowledge.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Blood donation attempts [ Time Frame: 60 weeks after index donation ]
    The number of blood donation attempts since their study participation will be obtained from the participants' donor records.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Donation Intention [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Intent to donate blood within the next 8 weeks will be assessed using three questions on a 7-point Likert-type scale, from 1 (disagree) to 7 (agree): I plan to donate blood in the next 8 weeks., How likely is it that you will donate blood in the next 8 weeks? and I will donate blood in the next 8 weeks. Total scores on the scale range from 3 to 21, with higher scores indicating greater intention to donate.

  2. Donation Attitude [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Attitudes toward blood donation will be assessed using a 6-item measure where individuals are asked to rate how donating blood in the next 8 weeks would seem using a 7-item Likert-type scale. The scale distinguishes between cognitive attitudes (evaluative judgments: useful versus useless, pointless versus worthwhile, the wrong thing to do versus the right thing to do) and affective attitudes (emotional reactions: unpleasant versus pleasant, unenjoyable versus enjoyable, frightening versus not frightening). Total scores on the scale range from 6 to 42, with higher scores reflecting more positive attitudes toward blood donation.

  3. Donation Perceived Behavioral Control [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Individuals' perception of control over their ability to donate blood will be assessed using a 6-item measure that assesses two components of perceived behavioral control: self-efficacy (three items) and controllability (three items). Items on the self-efficacy sub-scale ask about how confident the participant is in their ability to donate blood in the next 8 weeks, while the controllability sub-scale assesses how much control participants feel they have over whether or not they donate blood. Participants are asked to rate each item on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Total scores on the scale range from 6 to 42, with higher scores reflecting greater perception of control over ones ability to donate blood.

  4. Donation Subjective Norms [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Individuals' perception about subjective norms will be assessed using a six item, 7-point Likert-type scale, with anchors at 1 (disagree/unlikely) and 7 (agree/likely). Total scores on the scale range from 6 to 42. The measure assesses both descriptive norms (perceived behavior of others) and injunctive norms (what an individual believes others want from him/her).

  5. Blood Donor Identity [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Blood Donor Identity will be measured using an 18-item scale that examines an individual's motivation to donate on the six motivational factors proposed by Self Determination Theory: amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation. Participants are asked to rate their agreement with each item on a 7-point Likert-type scale, with individual item scores ranging from 1 (not at all true) to 7 (very true). A composite score for the total scale is calculated by combining the six subscale scores using the weighting of -3, -2, -1, +1, +2, +3 for the amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, identified regulation, integrated regulation, and intrinsic regulation subscales, respectively, in order to produce a single Relative Autonomy Index score.

  6. Blood Donation Anxiety [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    Anxiety will be assessed using the Blood Donor Anxiety Scale, a six-item scale that assesses for both the presence (3 items) and absence (3 items) of anxiety. Participants rate their agreement on how relaxed, content, pleasant, tense, nervous and jittery they would feel if they donated blood on a 4-point scale, with anchors at 1 (not at all) and 4 (very much). Composite scores on the scale range from 3 to 12, with higher scores on the presence subscale reflecting more anxiety, and higher scores on the absence subscale reflecting less anxiety about a future donation.

  7. Blood Donor Ambivalence [ Time Frame: on average 1 week after index donation; on average 2 days after interview; on average 7 weeks after interview ]
    The 6-item ambivalence scale asks participants to rate how true a statement is for them on a 7-point scale (1=Not at all true to 7=Very true). Separate subscale scores are calculated for commitment and indecision (scores ranging from 3 to 21 for each subscale).

  8. Psychological Need Support [ Time Frame: on average 2 days after interview ]
    To assess whether the Motivational Interview intervention supported the basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness, a 9-item Likert-type scale will be utilized (3 items per psychological need, anchors at 1 = Not at All and 7 = Extremely).

  9. Treatment Evaluation [ Time Frame: on average 2 days after interview ]
    Participants will be asked a series of questions regarding their experience during the interview.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Subject donated blood within the last week with New York Blood Center.
  • Subject has made 2 or more blood donations.
  • Subject is eligible to donate blood again.

Exclusion Criteria:

-


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03102385


Locations
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United States, Ohio
Ohio University
Athens, Ohio, United States, 45701
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ohio University
New York Blood Center
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Christopher R France, PhD Ohio University

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Responsible Party: Christopher R. France, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Psychology, Ohio University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03102385     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 16-X-331
First Posted: April 5, 2017    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 25, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: De-identified participant data may be obtained after data collection is completed. Individual participant data requests should be directed to the Principal Investigator.

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Christopher R. France, Ph.D., Ohio University:
blood donation
motivation
donor retention