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Trial record 17 of 23 for:    Estropipate

Ospemifene vs. Conjugated Estrogens in the Treatment of Postmenopausal Sexual Dysfunction

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03018106
Recruitment Status : Terminated (Obstacles with recruitment)
First Posted : January 11, 2017
Results First Posted : December 20, 2017
Last Update Posted : January 23, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Gina Northington, Emory University

Brief Summary:
Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) is a condition that impacts up to 60% of the growing postmenopausal female population, and the most common symptom is dyspareunia. Vaginal estrogen is the most common treatment for VVA, but it only marginally improves overall sexual function, and many women and clinicians avoid using it because of the risks of exogenous estrogen use during menopause. Ospemifene is a non-estrogen selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that is FDA-approved for treating dyspareunia related to VVA, and has shown superb improvements in overall sexual health. 104 women will be randomized to receive 12 weeks of 60mg oral ospemifene, taken daily, or 12 weeks of 0.5mg vaginal conjugated estrogens, which is placed vaginally twice per week. The improvements in sexual health and VVA symptom severity will be compared in each group. This study will help determine if ospemifene is a better treatment medication than conjugated estrogens.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological Drug: Ospemifene Drug: Vaginal conjugated estrogens Phase 4

Detailed Description:

Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) affects 57% of postmenopausal women. Vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) is a condition that impacts up to 60% of the growing postmenopausal female population, and the most common symptom is dyspareunia. Women with FSD are 3.84 times as likely to also have VVA. Vaginal estrogen is the most common treatment for VVA, but it only marginally improves overall sexual function, and many women and clinicians avoid using it because of the risks of exogenous estrogen use during menopause. Ospemifene is a non-estrogen selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) that is FDA-approved for treating dyspareunia related to VVA, and has shown superb improvements in overall sexual health. This oral medication, taken daily, improves vaginal health, and has demonstrated protective activity in the breast and bone tissues. It also has not demonstrated any carcinogenic activity in the endometrium or liver. This study hopes to determine if ospemifene is superior to conjugated estrogens in improving sexual function and vaginal atrophy symptoms.

104 women will be randomized to receive 12 weeks of 60mg oral ospemifene, taken daily, or 12 weeks of 0.5mg vaginal conjugated estrogens, which is placed vaginally twice per week. Each participant will be informed of her assigned medication, and will receive a medication coupon to help offset the cost of the medication. Each medication is FDA-approved for long-term use of at least 52 weeks. For this study, a 12-week prescription for the medication will be sent electronically to the pharmacy of the participant's choice. The improvements in sexual health and VVA symptom severity will be compared in each group.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 1 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Ospemifene Versus Conjugated Estrogens in the Treatment of Postmenopausal Sexual Dysfunction
Actual Study Start Date : June 30, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 29, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : September 29, 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Ospemifene
Women randomized to this arm will receive 60mg oral ospemifene, taken daily, for 12 weeks
Drug: Ospemifene
Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), and it is the only SERM approved in the United States to treat moderate to severe dyspareunia associated with VVA. It is an oral medication that is taken as a 60mg tablet once daily. Food intake increases its absorption by 2 to 3-fold, and this is not impacted by the fat or calorie content of the food. It is metabolized primarily in the liver, and is excreted in feces.
Other Name: Osphena

Active Comparator: Estrogen
Women randomized to this arm will receive 0.5mg vaginal conjugated estrogens, placed vaginally twice per week, for 12 weeks
Drug: Vaginal conjugated estrogens
Conjugated estrogens are a mixture of several different estrogen salts derived from natural sources and blended to approximate the composition of estrogens in the urine of pregnant horses. The main components are sodium estrone sulphate and sodium equilin sulfate. Vaginal estrogen is considered the medication of choice for treating vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA).
Other Name: Premarin Vaginal Cream




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Female Sexual Function Index Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ]
    The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is a 19 item questionnaire that asks about sexual function in the prior four weeks. The FSFI was developed for the specific purpose of assessing sexual arousal, orgasm, satisfaction, pain related to sexual functioning in clinical trial participants. Participants answer by selecting between 5-6 question-specific options to rate the degree to which the question fits their experience. Each response option is assigned a point and each question has 0-5 or 1-5 possible points. The points are summed to determine a total score. The total score can range from 2 to 36 and scores equal to or less than 26.55 indicate female sexual dysfunction (FSD).

  2. Pain With Sex [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ]
    Participants reported pain with sex at the Baseline Visit and after 12 weeks of treatment. Participants rated the severity of their symptoms from 0 to 3, where 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate and 3 = severe.

  3. Vaginal Dryness [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ]
    Participants reported vaginal dryness at the Baseline Visit and after 12 weeks of treatment. Participants rated the severity of their symptoms from 0 to 3, where 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate and 3 = severe.

  4. Vaginal Itching [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ]
    Participants reported vaginal itching at the Baseline Visit and after 12 weeks of treatment. Participants rated the severity of their symptoms from 0 to 3, where 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate and 3 = severe.

  5. Vaginal Irritation [ Time Frame: Baseline, Week 12 ]
    Participants reported vaginal irritation at the Baseline Visit and after 12 weeks of treatment. Participants rated the severity of their symptoms from 0 to 3, where 0 = none, 1 = mild, 2 = moderate and 3 = severe.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   40 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Interested in resuming or continuing sexual activity
  • Greater than 12 months since last menstrual cycle or prior bilateral oophorectomy
  • Dyspareunia as a vulvovaginal atrophy symptom
  • Normal mammogram within 12 months prior to entry into the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History or suspicion of breast carcinoma
  • History of hormone-dependent tumor
  • Genital bleeding of unknown cause
  • Ongoing vaginal infection
  • History of cerebrovascular accident (CVA), myocardial infarction (MI) or heart disease
  • Uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) over 160/100
  • Serious disease or chronic condition that may prevent completion of study
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) over 40
  • Hypercoagulable state, or currently on anticoagulant therapy
  • Use of any exogenous sex hormone within three months from study entry, or during the study
  • Pelvic surgery within the last 12 months

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03018106


Locations
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United States, Georgia
Emory Midtown Hospital
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30308
Emory Clinic
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Emory Hospital
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Emory St. Joseph's Hospital
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30342
Sponsors and Collaborators
Emory University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Gina Northington, MD, PhD Emory University
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Gina Northington, Emory University:

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Responsible Party: Gina Northington, Associate Professor, Emory University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03018106     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB00088077
First Posted: January 11, 2017    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: December 20, 2017
Last Update Posted: January 23, 2018
Last Verified: November 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Gina Northington, Emory University:
Female sexual disorder
Aging
Menopause
Obstetrics/Gynecology
Female urogenital disorder
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Sexual Dysfunction, Physiological
Genital Diseases, Male
Genital Diseases, Female
Tamoxifen
Estrogens
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP)
Hormones
Hormones, Hormone Substitutes, and Hormone Antagonists
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Estrogen Antagonists
Hormone Antagonists
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal
Antineoplastic Agents
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Bone Density Conservation Agents