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Trial record 30 of 431 for:    "Communication Disorders"

Sharing Books With Children

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03006744
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : December 30, 2016
Last Update Posted : January 9, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Economic and Social Research Council, United Kingdom
University of Liverpool
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Anne Hesketh, University of Manchester

Brief Summary:

The promotion of language and communicative development in the early years is extremely important. Children who enter school with good language skills have better educational and economic success. This study is part of a large project across Liverpool, Manchester and Sheffield Universities to determine how shared reading promotes child language development, and use this knowledge to make it an effective language boosting tool for children across the whole socio-economic spectrum. The overall project includes:

  • observational studies to identify what language boosting behaviours are responsible for shared reading's effectiveness, and how parents from different socio-economic groups use these behaviours during shared reading;
  • intervention studies to evaluate packages designed to train parents in the use of specific language boosting behaviours during reading;
  • a qualitative exploration of the reasons people may not read with their children.

This study will provide training to parents on how to develop their children's attention to the features of words while reading books with them. The research questions are:

i) Is specific training focused on the sound properties of words during shared reading more effective at developing children's phonological awareness and language than general advice on the importance of reading with children? ii) Do children with speech sound disorder and typically developing children respond differently to intervention? iii) To what extent are differences in training implementation and effects explained by socio-economic status?

Our participants will be parents and their children, aged 30-54 months, with a diagnosis of speech sound disorder. They will be recruited via speech and language therapy services in the North West. Data collection will be carried out by the research team in participants' homes, taking 3-4 hours in total over 2-3 appointments. The sessions will be audio-recorded; parents will complete questionnaires, and children's language and speech will be assessed with standardised and in-house tests.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Speech Sound Disorder Behavioral: Phonological awareness training Behavioral: Reading enjoyment training Not Applicable

  Show Detailed Description

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: How to Promote Children's Language Development Using Family-based Shared Book Reading: Study B; Examining the Effect of Training Shared Reading Practice, With Form-emphasising Books, on Children's Language and Phonological Awareness
Study Start Date : January 2017
Estimated Primary Completion Date : February 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : March 2018

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Phonological awareness training
Parents will be given specific training on how to improve phonological awareness using books provided by the investigator. Parents watch a video with examples of how to improve phonological awareness. Suggestions include placing emphasis on rhyme and alliteration, segmenting long words into syllables and talking about how words sound and what they mean.
Behavioral: Phonological awareness training
Training on specific ways to improve children's phonological awareness by making them more aware of the sound structure of words.

Placebo Comparator: Reading enjoyment training
Parents will be given general training on how to make reading fun. Parents watch a video with examples of how they can bring books to life with funny voices, actions, and so on. The training is of a similar duration to the intervention arm.
Behavioral: Reading enjoyment training
Training on how to make reading enjoyable for children.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in standardised Preschool Inventory of Phonological Awareness: Rhyme awareness subtest score [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    Change in score from the baseline to the post-training rhyme awareness PIPA subtest, which measures the ability of a child to identify a non-rhyming word embedded in a set of three rhyming words.

  2. Change in standardised Preschool Inventory of Phonological Awareness: Alliteration awareness subtest score [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    Change in score from the baseline to the post-training alliteration awareness PIPA subtest, which measures the ability of a child to identify a non-alliterative word embedded in a set of three alliterative words.

  3. Change in standardised Preschool Inventory of Phonological Awareness: Phoneme isolation subtest score [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    Change in score from the baseline to the post-training phoneme isolation PIPA subtest, which measures the ability of child to identify the first phoneme of a spoken word that is presented with visual aid.

  4. Change in custom designed Syllable segmentation test score. [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    Change in score from the baseline to the post-training syllable segmentation score, which is a custom designed test which measures a child's ability to segment words into their constituent syllables.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   42 Months to 54 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • known to speech and language therapists with a diagnosis of speech sound disorder OR recognised by parents as having less mature speech production than their peers AND perform below criterion on a brief speech sound production screening assessment

Exclusion Criteria:

  • a known neurological diagnosis (such as Down Syndrome, Autism, Cerebral Palsy)
  • born before 37 weeks gestation (premature)
  • weighed less than 5lb 9oz at birth (low birth weight)
  • a permanent impairment of vision (unless remediated by visual aids) or hearing
  • parents have a learning disability which puts their children at risk of language delay and excludes the parents from giving informed consent on their own and on their children's behalf.
  • exposure to another language (not English) for 1 day or more in a typical week (please note that this also excludes children of parents who do not speak English)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03006744


Contacts
Contact: Daphne A Barker, PhD 161 275 3458 ext 53458 daphne.barker@manchester.ac.uk
Contact: Anne Hesketh, PhD 161 275 3375 ext 53375 anne.hesketh@manchester.ac.uk

Locations
United Kingdom
The University of Manchester Not yet recruiting
Manchester, Greater Manchester, United Kingdom, M13 9PL
Contact: Daphne A Barker, PhD    161 275 3458 ext 3458    daphne.barker@manchester.ac.uk   
Contact: Anne Hesketh, PhD    161 275 3375 ext 3375    anne.hesketh@manchester.ac.uk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Manchester
Economic and Social Research Council, United Kingdom
University of Liverpool
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Anne Hesketh, PhD The University of Manchester

Publications:
Blanden, J. Bucking the trend: What enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? London: Department of Work and Pensions. 2006
Bus AG, van Ijzendoorn MH, Pellegrini AD, Bus AG, van Ijzendoorn MH, Pellegrini AD. Joint book reading makes for success in learning to read: A meta-analysis on intergenerational transmission of literacy. Review of Educational Research, 65(1): 1, 1995
Jordan GE, Snow CE, Porche MV. Project EASE: The effect of a family literacy project on kindergarten students' early literacy skills. Reading Research Quarterly, 35(4): 524-546, 2000
Manz PH, Hughes C, Barnabas E, Bracaliello C, Ginsburg-Block M. A descriptive review and meta-analysis of family-based emergent literacy interventions: To what extent is the research applicable to low-income, ethnic-minority or linguistically-diverse young children? Early Childhood Research Quarterly 25: 409-431, 2010
Mol SE, Bus AG, De Jong MT, Smeets DJM, Mol S, Bus A et al. Added value of dialogic Parent-Child book readings: A meta-analysis. Early Education and Development, 19(1): 7, 2008
Sutton Trust (2012). Social mobility and education gaps in the four major Anglophone countries. Report of The Sutton Trust/Carnegie Social Mobility Summit held at the Royal Society.

Responsible Party: Anne Hesketh, Principal Investigator, University of Manchester
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03006744     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: ES/M003752/1
First Posted: December 30, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 9, 2017
Last Verified: January 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Speech Sound Disorder
Communication Disorders
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders