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Learning Health System for Asthma

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03000491
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified August 2016 by University of Edinburgh.
Recruitment status was:  Not yet recruiting
First Posted : December 22, 2016
Last Update Posted : January 23, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
NHS Lothian
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Edinburgh

Brief Summary:

This study forms an initial phase of work aimed at developing a learning health system (LHS), whereby data relating to asthma is extracted from patient electronic health records (EHRs) across Scotland, analysed to explore variations in clinical practice and then shared with general practices to highlight any improvements that can be made so that they can better support people with asthma.

If successful, the investigators hope to progress to the main quality improvement phase involving an increased number of practices and then incrementally build this up to cover the whole of Scotland.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Asthma Other: No intervention

Detailed Description:

The UK has amongst the highest rates of asthma in the world as well as some of the poorest health outcomes from asthma.

Investigations into asthma deaths in the UK have found that the way patients were managed in the time leading up to their death could be improved significantly and half of asthma deaths are potentially avoidable. For most people with asthma, symptoms can come and go and sometimes be erratic. To prevent these symptoms, there is a window of opportunity to intervene with the appropriate care. This window occurs between when someone experiences early symptoms like night cough or wheeze and when they experience a full-blown asthma attack.

Most people with asthma receive care primarily in their general practice. General practices have a history of using health information technology to care for their patients. The use of this technology over time has resulted in the creation of rich electronic healthcare data. Through this rich data there are opportunities to create a system whereby clinical management can be benchmarked and improvements highlighted.

This study forms an initial phase of work aimed at developing a learning health system (LHS), whereby data relating to asthma is extracted from patient electronic health records (EHRs) across Scotland, analysed to explore variations in clinical practice and then shared with general practices to highlight any improvements that can be made so that they can better support people with asthma.

If successful, the investigators hope to progress to the main quality improvement phase involving an increased number of practices and then incrementally build this up to cover the whole of Scotland.


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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 750000 participants
Observational Model: Other
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Developing a National Learning Health System for Asthma to Reduce the Risk of Asthma Attacks and the Risk of Asthma Hospitalisations and Deaths
Study Start Date : December 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : February 2017
Estimated Study Completion Date : February 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Asthma




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Variations in clinical practice as assessed by data relating to asthma extracted from patient electronic health records. [ Time Frame: At study completion (3 months) ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Patients (with and without asthma) in Scotland registered with primary care practices from 2010-2015.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

• Patients registered with general practices across Scotland.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients from general practices that do not to opt-in to the study.
  • Patients with a READ code recording dissent from use of their records for research purposes.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03000491


Contacts
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Contact: Colin Simpson, BSc MSc PhD 0131 650 4151 c.simpson@ed.ac.uk

Locations
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United Kingdom
University ot Edinburgh Not yet recruiting
Edinburgh, United Kingdom, EH8 9AG
Contact: Colin Simpson, BSc MSc PhD    0131 650 4151    c.simpson@ed.ac.uk   
Principal Investigator: Colin Simpson, BSc MSc PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Edinburgh
NHS Lothian

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Responsible Party: University of Edinburgh
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03000491     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: AC16078
First Posted: December 22, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 23, 2017
Last Verified: August 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Asthma
Bronchial Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Hypersensitivity
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Hypersensitivity
Immune System Diseases