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Women Empowered to Live With Lupus Study (WELL)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02988661
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : December 9, 2016
Results First Posted : March 22, 2022
Last Update Posted : October 4, 2022
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Cristina M Drenkard, Emory University

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this research is to examine whether the Chronic Disease Self-management Program (CDSMP) would improve health outcomes and reduce health care use in African American women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The CDSMP is a generic, evidence-based self-management education program that has been shown to help people with chronic conditions to take control of their health problems. This study focuses on African American women with SLE because the CDSMP has not been widely studied in this population.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic Behavioral: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The CDSMP is an evidence-based, community-based, generic self-management program that consists of 6 weekly classes of two and a half hours each one, for six weeks. CDSMP classes are facilitated by certified peer leaders. Because the CDSMP is widely disseminated and available to the adult U.S. population through community centers, it may be a suitable and accessible option for African Americans with SLE, even though it is not specifically tailored to SLE or to African Americans. As the CDSMP has been primarily evaluated in predominantly white middle-class seniors with more common diseases (e.g. osteoarthritis, diabetes), the effectiveness of the CDSMP in helping African American women to self-manage SLE is unknown.

This study will examine the effectiveness of the CDSMP to improve patient-reported outcomes and reduce health care utilization in African American women with lupus. Using a two-group longitudinal cohort design with participants sampled from a parent population-based SLE cohort in Georgia, investigators will examine behaviors, health and healthcare outcomes, and the extent to which individual characteristics modify the effectiveness of the CDSMP.

The Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL), a longitudinal cohort of patients with a validated diagnosis of SLE, will be used to enroll participants into the intervention. A random sample of African American women with SLE selected from the parent GOAL cohort will be recruited into the WELL (Women Empowered to Live with Lupus) cohort. WELL participants will attend the CDSMP classes in the community, along with people with other chronic illnesses. WELL participants will be asked to attend the CDSMP in the community and answer questionnaires at 4 select time periods before and after the program. Investigators will follow participant's progress for up to 18 months after they attend the CDSMP.

African American women from the GOAL cohort non-selected to be assigned to the intervention will comprise the usual care group. Participants will continue their longitudinal assessments as part of the GOAL cohort data collection efforts. Changes in outcomes for up to 18 months will be compared between WELL participants and the usual care group.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 699 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Widespread Self-management Education Program to Reduce Health Disparities in African American Women With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Actual Study Start Date : January 19, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 26, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2022


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Chronic Disease Self-management Program (CDSMP)
A random sample of African American women with SLE selected from the Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL) parent cohort will be used to recruit participants into the CDSMP. This group will be identified as the WELL Cohort.
Behavioral: Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP)
The CDSMP consist of 6 weekly classes of two and a half hours each one, for six weeks. A group of 10-16 people with different chronic conditions attend the classes together. Classes are facilitated by two certified leaders, one or both of whom are non-health professionals with chronic diseases. The workshop covers topics such as: 1) how to deal with frustration, fatigue, pain and isolation, 2) exercise for maintaining and improving strength, flexibility, and endurance, 3) communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals, 4) nutrition, 5) decision making, 6) appropriate use of medications and how to evaluate new treatments. Participants receive a companion book, Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions, and an audio relaxation CD, Relaxation for Mind and Body.
Other Name: Living Well with a Chronic Condition Workshop

No Intervention: Usual Care
African American women consented into the parent Georgians Organized Against Lupus (GOAL) cohort who have not been selected to be enrolled in the intervention will comprise the usual care group. This group will continue their longitudinal assessments as part or the GOAL cohort data collection efforts.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Communication With Physician - Stanford 3Q Scale Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The Stanford 3Q Scale is a three-question measure that assesses communication between patients and physicians. The participant is asked to rank their responses using a 5-point Likert scale. Total scores range fro 0 to 5 and a higher score indicates better communication with physicians.

  2. Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Self-efficacy for Managing Medications and Treatments Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    Self-efficacy for managing medical care was assessed with the PROMIS Self-efficacy for Managing Medications and Treatments Short Form (SF) 8a instrument. This is an eight-item tool that quantifies the level of current confidence (from 1=not confident at all to 5=very confident) a person with a chronic condition has in taking and managing medication and other treatments in challenging situations (e.g., traveling, running out of medication, occurrence of side effects). Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and a standard deviation (SD) of 10. A higher score indicates better self-efficacy for managing medications and treatments; scores higher than 50 indicate greater self-efficacy for managing medical care compared to the reference population.

  3. PROMIS Global Health Physical Health Domain Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS for Global Health short form is a 10-item instrument representing multiple domains such as general health, quality of life, and mental health. Participants will be asked to respond to questions on a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 represents poor health, and 5 represents excellent health. Total raw scores are calculated for two domains: Physical Health and Mental Health. Raw scores are further converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates better physical health; scores higher than 50 indicate greater physical health compared to the reference population..

  4. PROMIS Global Health Mental Health Domain Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS for Global Health short form is a 10-item instrument representing multiple domains such as general health, quality of life, and mental health. Participants will be asked to respond to questions on a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 represents poor health, and 5 represents excellent health. Total raw scores are calculated for two domains: Physical Health and Mental Health. Raw scores are further converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates better mental health; scores higher than 50 indicate better mental health compared to the reference population.

  5. PROMIS Physical Function Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, 18 ]
    The Patient-Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Physical Function SF 10b is a self-administered instrument that assesses self-reported capability rather than actual performance of physical activities. Participants are asked to respond to questions regarding the extent of their physical function. Responses range from 1 to 5, where 1 represents "unable to do" and 5 represents "without any difficulty". Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates better physical function capabilities; scores higher than 50 indicate greater physical function compared to the reference population.

  6. PROMIS Pain Interference Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Pain Interference SF 8a is a self-administered instrument that assesses the interference of pain on daily activities. Participants are asked to respond to questions regarding the extent of their pain. Responses range from 1 to 5, where 1 represents "not at all" and 5 represents "very much". Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A lower score indicates the least amount of pain interference; scores higher than 50 indicate greater pain interference compared to the reference population.

  7. PROMIS Fatigue Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Fatigue SF 8a is a self-administered instrument that assesses fatigue level within the past seven days. Participants are asked to respond to questions regarding fatigue frequency. Responses range from 1 to 5, where 1 represents "never" and five represents "always". Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10; scores higher than 50 indicate greater fatigue compared to the reference population.

  8. PROMIS Sleep Disturbance Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Sleep Disturbance SF 8a is a self-administered instrument to assess self-reported perceptions of sleep quality, sleep depth, and restoration associated with sleep. This includes perceived difficulties and concerns with getting to sleep or staying asleep, as well as perceptions of the adequacy of and satisfaction with sleep. It assesses sleep disturbance over the past seven days. Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates more sleep disturbance; scores higher than 50 indicate greater sleep disturbance compared to the reference population.

  9. PROMIS Anxiety Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Anxiety SF 8a is a self-administered instrument to assess emotional distress within the past seven days. Participants are asked to rate their anxiety level for various items ranked from 1 to 5, where 1 represents "never" and 5 represents "always". Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates high anxiety; scores higher than 50 indicate greater anxiety compared to the reference population.

  10. PROMIS Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, 18 ]
    The PROMIS Ability to Participate in Social Roles and Activities SF 8a is a self-administered instrument to assess perceived ability to perform one's usual social roles and activities. Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates better perceived abilities; scores higher than 50 indicate better perceived abilities to participate in social activities and roles compared to the reference population.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Patient Activation Measure (PAM-10) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a tool to assess an individual's knowledge, skill, and confidence for managing one's health and healthcare. Individuals who measure high on this assessment typically understand the importance of taking a pro-active role in managing their health and have the skills and confidence to do so. The PAM survey measures patients on a 0-100 scale and can segment patients into one of four activation levels along an empirically derived continuum. Data on PAM-10 scale values are pending receiving the scores from Insignia, which is the organization that owns the license.

  2. PROMIS Adult Self-Efficacy Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Adult Self-Efficacy SF 4a is a self-administered instrument to assess current level of confidence in managing symptoms of chronic conditions. Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates higher self-efficacy; scores higher than 50 indicate greater self-efficacy compared to the reference population.

  3. PROMIS Anger Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The PROMIS Anger SF 5a is a self-administered instrument to measure angry mood (irritability, frustration), negative social cognitions (interpersonal sensitivity, envy, disagreeableness), and efforts to control anger. Total raw scores are converted to T-scores by the Health Measures Scoring Service. The T-score rescales the raw score into a standardized score with a mean of 50 and an SD of 10. A higher score indicates more anger; scores higher than 50 indicate greater anger compared to the reference population.

  4. Perceived Stress Scale 4 (PSS-4) Score [ Time Frame: Baseline, Months 6, 12, and 18 ]
    The Perceived Stress Scale 4 (PSS-4) is the most widely used psychological instrument for measuring the perception of stress. Participants are asked to rank responses to each of the four items on a scale from 0 to 4, where zero means never and four means very often. Total scores range from 0 to 16 and a higher score indicates higher perceived stress.

  5. Hospitalization Rate [ Time Frame: Up to 2 years ]
    The number of hospitalizations will be collected from the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) administrative data for the pre- and post-intervention period (up to two years). The Georgia DPH has been focused on the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic which has caused delays in obtaining the information for this outcome measure.

  6. Emergency Department Visit Rate [ Time Frame: Up to 2 years ]
    The number of emergency department visits will be collected from the Georgia DPH administrative data for the pre- and post-intervention period (up to two years). The Georgia DPH has been focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and obtaining information for this outcome measure has been delayed.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Currently participating in the GOAL study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participation in the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) in the past five years
  • Significant cognitive impairment

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02988661


Locations
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United States, Georgia
Emory University
Atlanta, Georgia, United States, 30322
Sponsors and Collaborators
Emory University
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Cristina M Drenkard, MD, PhD Emory University
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Cristina M Drenkard, Emory University:
Informed Consent Form  [PDF] August 15, 2018

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Cristina M Drenkard, Associate Professor, Emory University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02988661    
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB00003656
R01MD010455 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: December 9, 2016    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: March 22, 2022
Last Update Posted: October 4, 2022
Last Verified: September 2022

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Cristina M Drenkard, Emory University:
Autoimmunity
Immune System Disorders
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic
Connective Tissue Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases