ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Genomic Outcomes of Metformin (GOMET)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02986659
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : December 8, 2016
Last Update Posted : December 13, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Wake Forest University Health Sciences

Brief Summary:
Medical scientists have found that people with diabetes who take the drug Metformin have less age-related disease than those taking other treatments and researchers believe it may prevent numerous diseases and conditions that effect older people. In addition, metformin extends lifespan in some animal models of human disease. The purpose of this study is to see if taking Metformin causes changes in blood cells consistent with improved health and longevity in people who do not have diabetes. In this study Metformin will be compared to placebo. A placebo is a substance, like a sugar pill, that is not thought to have any effect on a participants disease or condition. In this study participants will either receive the active study medication, Metformin or placebo which is not active. Placebos are used in research studies to see if the drug being studied really does have an effect.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Coronary Artery Disease Mild Cognitive Impairment Obesity, Abdominal Hypertension Drug: Metformin Drug: Placebo Phase 4

Detailed Description:

The number of older adults is projected to increase dramatically by 2050. Aging-related diseases and conditions still seriously compromise the quality of life among most older adults. Several pharmaceutical agents, such as metformin, have been tested to extend lifespan and delay aging-related diseases and dysfunctions in mice. Metformin, a biguanide antidiabetic drug, reduces the risk for developing type-2 diabetes in persons at risk by over one-third with few adverse effects (e.g., gastrointestinal irritation). Metformin prevents type-2 diabetes primarily through decreasing hepatic glucose synthesis, as well as enhancing insulin sensitivity and increasing peripheral glucose uptake. The molecular mechanisms remain unclear, although a number of potential mechanism such as activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mitochondrial glycerophosphate dehydrogenase have been proposed. The fact that metformin treatment in persons with type-2 diabetes has been associated with reduced risk of other aging-related diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline supports the possibility of the beneficial effects of metformin on healthy aging. It is imperative to capitalize on these leads to extend health span among older adults.

To translate animal findings to human intervention trials, appropriate aging biomarkers are needed. Methylomic and transcriptomic profiles in relevant cells may reflect molecular features that mediate effects of both genetic and environmental factors on aging-related functional decline and disease. The roles of monocytes have been implicated in development of many aging-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurodegenerative disease. In a cross-sectional association study of 1,200 monocyte samples, we identified 1,794 age-associated methylation sites and 2,704 age-associated transcripts, which were over-represented in two networks (autophagy and oxidative phosphorylation) and suggestive of decline in those functions with age. Both autophagy and oxidative phosphorylation are considered as key contributors to the aging process, and their dysfunctions have been linked to aging-related diseases. Changes in these aging-related omic biomarkers may be early indicators of cellular damage or disruption that eventually leads to age-related dysfunctions. Assessment of these aging biomarkers in response to therapeutic intervention may also provide molecular insight for personalizing treatment. The investigators propose a pilot study to examine changes in aging-related omic profiles after 3 months of metformin treatment in 35 monocyte samples from older adults using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study design.

Our overarching goal of the pilot study is to evaluate the utility of using the aging-related omic biomarkers as an indicator of pharmacologic responses in the anti-aging therapeutic intervention trials through the following specific aims. Although this pilot study does not have sufficient power to definitively test all the aims, it will provide essential preliminary data for developing a full scale research program.

  • Aim 1A: To test the effects of the metformin treatment on transcriptomic profiles and related functional changes in human monocytes,
  • Aim 1B: To explore the effects of the metformin treatment on methylomic profiles in human monocytes,
  • Aim 2: To investigate the longitudinal relationship between transcriptional and functional changes in human monocytes during the metformin treatment and
  • Aim 3: To test the effects of the metformin treatment on frailty and other aging-related physical and cognitive measures and investigate the longitudinal relationship between these changes and transcriptional changes.

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in 30 participants using metformin and matching placebo will be used. In the absence of a treatment by sequence interaction effect, this design can increase study power for evaluating treatment effects by allowing each participant to be his/her own control. The period effect may be minimum because the primary outcomes, methylation and transcriptional measures, are relatively stable overtime.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 34 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Genomic Outcomes of Metformin
Actual Study Start Date : August 3, 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : November 15, 2018
Actual Study Completion Date : November 15, 2018

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Metformin
Metformin dosing at 425, 850 and 1700 mg with GLUCOPHAGE® (metformin hydrochloride) Tablets. Treatment with metformin will be initiated at a dose of 425 mg (half pill) taken orally once a day at night for 7 days. After the week, the participant will be called to assess tolerance and will be asked to increase dose to one pill at night at a dose of 850 mg for one week. At the end of the second week, participants will be called again and if they tolerated the second dose, they will be asked to take two 850 mg pills, one in the morning and one at night, for a total dose of 1700 mg which is within the range of the usual effective dose of 1500 to 2000 mg/day for the remainder of the 3 months.
Drug: Metformin
Drug: Placebo
Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Dietary Supplement: Placebo with Methylcellulose capsules. Treatment with placebo will be initiated at a dose of a half pill taken orally once a day at night for 7 days. After the week, the participant will be called to assess tolerance and will be asked to increase dose to one pill at night for one week. At the end of the second week, participants will be called again and if they tolerated the second dose, they will be asked to take two pills, one in the morning and one at night for the remainder of the 3 months.
Drug: Metformin
Drug: Placebo



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in eigengene scores [ Time Frame: baseline, 12 weeks, 24 weeks ]
    Individual methylation sites and transcripts, especially the eigengenes of autophage, oxidative phosphorylation and protein synthesis networks Methylomic and transcriptomic profiles in monocytes will be quantified using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip and the Illumina HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChips, respectively. All of these measures will be aggregated into one eigengene score.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   65 Years to 79 Years   (Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 65 - 79

Must meet criteria from one or more of the following groups:

Group 1 (Can have 1 or 2 of these, but not all 3)

  • History of coronary artery disease (MI/heart attack, stroke, heart failure, or peripheral artery disease)
  • Cancer, with no active treatment in the last year
  • MCI (MoCA >18<26 -inclusive of 1 point if <12 years of education Group 2
  • Decline physical function (walking speed < 1 m/s) Group 3 (Either or both)
  • Abdominal obesity (>88cm women, >102cm men) AND hypertension (treated or resting blood pressure >140/90
  • Abdominal obesity (>88cm women, >102cm men) AND hyperlipidemia (treated or fasting total cholesterol >240 English literacy Willing to provide informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • eGFR <45
  • Type 2 diabetes (HbA1c>6.5) or type 1 diabetes
  • Any tobacco or nicotine product use in the past year
  • Low vitamin B12 Levels (< 300 pg/mL)
  • Self-reported severe difficulty or inability to walk 400m or climb 10 steps (from Q 2 and 19 on PAT-D)
  • Self-reported difficulty or inability to perform basic ADL functions (from Q 10, 13, 14, 16 on PAT-D)
  • Excessive alcohol use (>14 drinks/week)
  • Cancer requiring treatment in past year (except skin)
  • Dementia - diagnosed and/or MoCA score <18
  • Parkinson's or other neurological disease
  • Chronic liver disease or cirrhosis
  • End stage renal disease or on dialysis
  • Rheumatic conditions (Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and any other autoimmune disease the -PI deems them to be ineligible for)
  • Thyroid problems the PI deems them to be ineligible for
  • Gout
  • Involved in another interventional study
  • Hemoglobin <8 or diagnosed with anemia
  • Recent unintentional weight change (+/- 10 lbs. in the last 12 months)
  • BMI <18.5
  • Likely to not follow the protocol
  • PI deems unfit to participate
  • Already taking Metformin or any other drug intended to treat diabetes

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02986659


Locations
United States, North Carolina
Wake Forest Health Sciences
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States, 27157
Sponsors and Collaborators
Wake Forest University Health Sciences
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jingzhong Ding, PhD Wake Forest University Health Sciences

Responsible Party: Wake Forest University Health Sciences
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02986659     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB00034977
First Posted: December 8, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 13, 2018
Last Verified: December 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Coronary Artery Disease
Myocardial Ischemia
Coronary Disease
Cognitive Dysfunction
Obesity, Abdominal
Heart Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Arteriosclerosis
Arterial Occlusive Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cognition Disorders
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Metformin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs