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Trial record 98 of 398 for:    cysteine

G-CSF Plus NAC In Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02971306
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : November 22, 2016
Last Update Posted : September 19, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr.Virendra Singh, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research

Brief Summary:

Alcoholic hepatitis is related to very high mortality rate. About 40% of the patients are died within first 6 months after the detection of the clinical syndrome. Therefore, it is very essential for proper diagnosis and early treatment. In response to acute or chronic liver damage, bone marrow derived stem cells can spontaneously populate liver and differentiate into hepatic cells. Animal and human studies suggested that injured hepatocyte may be replaced by pluripotent bone marrow cells. However, this hepatocyte repopulation is highly dependent on varieties of liver injury and therapeutic conditions6. The studies has suggested Granulocyte-colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) can regenerate hepatocyte by fusing with hematopoietic cells, thereby enhancing the liver histology and survival rate.

G-CSF is a cytokine capable to regulate a number of functions in neutrophils. In three recent studies mobilization of bone marrow stem cells induced by G-CSF was observed in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. In two of this studies there was a survival benefit with the use of G-CSF.

Alcoholism leads to decrease in endogenous antioxidant potential. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) patients show low endogenous antioxidants. Chronic ethanol consumption cause selective deficiency in the availability of reduced glutathione (GSH) in mitochondria has been reported. This is due to impaired functioning of GSH transporter from cytosol to mitochondrial matrix. The effect on glutathione replenishing potential by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) can be used to reduce oxidative stress, which also has excellent safety profile. Therefore, NAC can be used for severe alcoholic hepatitis treatment due to its therapeutic potential factor. NAC also inhibit apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In a study high doses of intravenous N-acetyl cysteine therapy for 14 days conferred neither survival benefits nor early biological improvement in severe alcoholic hepatitis patients with adequate nutritional support.However, these results must be viewed with caution, since the study suffered from a lack of power. In a recent study, NAC and corticosteroids combination therapy benefits among patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis in 1 month survival, although the final outcome at 6 month survival was not improved. There are no studies on the use of combination therapy of NAC plus G-CSF in patient with severe alcoholic hepatitis.

Therefore we plan to study the safety and efficacy of combination therapy of G-CSF and NAC in the patients with alcoholic hepatitis.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Alcoholic Hepatitis Drug: standard medical therapy Drug: G-CSF Drug: n-Acetylcysteine Phase 4

Detailed Description:

Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis, admitted to Department of Hepatology PGIMER, Chandigarh from July 2014 to December 2016 will be included in the study.

METHODS

This will be an open label trial. A randomization code is generated by random number table. The patients will be randomized to receive standard medical therapy of pentoxifylline only as control and combination therapy of Pentoxifylline with NAC and G-CSF as cases. There will be one control and two cases as below:

1) Pentoxifylline (control) 2) Pentoxifylline+G-CSF (case 1) 3) Pentoxifylline+G-CSF +NAC (case2) A) Pentoxifylline 400 mg thrice daily for 28 days A) Pentoxifylline 400 mg thrice daily for 28 days plus G-CSF 5 mcg/kg every 12 hourly for consecutive 5 days A) Pentoxifylline 400 mg thrice daily for 28 days plus G-CSF 5 mcg/kg every 12 hourly for 5 days plus NAC 300 mg/kg on day 1 (150 mg/kg in 250 ml of 5% dextrose over a minute of 30 minutes,50 mg/kg in 500ml 5% dextrose over a period of 4 hours, 100mg /kg in 1000 ml of 5% dextrose over a period of 16 hours ) and on day 2 through 5 100mg /kg/day in 1000ml of glucose solution.

This will be a single time therapy. Patients will be admitted in the department of hepatology and will be assessed everyday clinically as well as by laboratory tests during therapy to assess safety and effects of treatment.

  1. Total leukocytes count will be assessed daily.
  2. Circulating CD 34 positive cells will be measured on day 0 and 6 of G-CSF therapy.
  3. In addition, ultrasonography will be performed at day 1 and 6 in order to evaluate difference in spleen size and portal vein flow.
  4. Biochemical, coagulation, and hematological parameters (Liver function tests, Renal Function Tests, Prothrombin Time, International Normalised Ratio, etc.) will be monitored periodically, daily for 1 week, then weekly for 1month and monthly for three month.

All patients will be followed at weekly interval for 1 month and then monthly for 3 months.

Outcome:

Primary Objectives:

Survival at 3 months

Secondary Objectives:

Mobilisation of CD34 positive cells in peripheral blood. Clinical/biochemical improvement in liver function profile. Improvement in prognostic scores-Maddrey's Discriminant function, MELD score, and Child score.

Safety and efficacy of G-CSF and NAC in alcoholic hepatitis


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Plus N-Acetyl Cysteine In Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis
Study Start Date : July 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2017
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Standard Medical therapy
standard medical therapy
Drug: standard medical therapy
Standard medical therapy involves primary treatment with pentoxifylline at a dose of 400 mg three times a day and normal hospital nutrition (1800 to 2000 kcal per day). Diuretics, sodium restriction and albumin for treatment of ascites or fresh frozen plasma for coagulopathy or antibiotics for any focus of infection as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), pneumonia, cellulitis, and urinary tract infection as indicated.

Experimental: G-CSF
standard medical therapy plus G-CSF- 5μg/Kg s.c every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days
Drug: standard medical therapy
Standard medical therapy involves primary treatment with pentoxifylline at a dose of 400 mg three times a day and normal hospital nutrition (1800 to 2000 kcal per day). Diuretics, sodium restriction and albumin for treatment of ascites or fresh frozen plasma for coagulopathy or antibiotics for any focus of infection as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), pneumonia, cellulitis, and urinary tract infection as indicated.

Drug: G-CSF
G-CSF- 5μg/Kg s.c every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days

Experimental: G-CSF and NAC
standard medical therapy plus G-CSF- 5μg/Kg s.c every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days plus NAC (day 1: NAC at 150, 50, and 100 mg/kg in 250, 500, and 1000 ml of 5% glucose solution over 30 minutes, 4 hours, and 16 hours, respectively; days 2 through 5: 100 mg/kg/day in 1000 ml of 5% glucose solution)
Drug: standard medical therapy
Standard medical therapy involves primary treatment with pentoxifylline at a dose of 400 mg three times a day and normal hospital nutrition (1800 to 2000 kcal per day). Diuretics, sodium restriction and albumin for treatment of ascites or fresh frozen plasma for coagulopathy or antibiotics for any focus of infection as spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP), pneumonia, cellulitis, and urinary tract infection as indicated.

Drug: G-CSF
G-CSF- 5μg/Kg s.c every 12 hours for 5 consecutive days

Drug: n-Acetylcysteine
n-Acetylcysteine at 150, 50, and 100 mg/kg in 250, 500, and 1000 ml of 5% glucose solution over 30 minutes, 4 hours, and 16 hours, respectively; days 2 through 5: 100 mg/kg/day in 1000 ml of 5% glucose solution




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Primary end point- Survival at the end of 90 days [ Time Frame: 90 days ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. mobilization of CD34+ cells in peripheral blood [ Time Frame: 6 days ]
  2. improvement in MELD score [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
  3. Number of participants with treatment-related adverse events in the different treatment groups [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
  4. improvement in modified Discriminant Factor [ Time Frame: 90 days ]
  5. improvement in Child Turcotte Pugh score [ Time Frame: 90 days ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Alcoholic hepatitis patients:

  1. More than 10 years of heavy alcohol consumption (mean intake ≈ 100 g/day).
  2. Elevated aspartate aminotransferase level (but <500 IU per millilitre) and Ratio ofAST/ALT≥2 times
  3. Elevated serum total bilirubin level ≥ 5 mgdL (86 μmol/L)
  4. Elevated INR(≥1.5) and
  5. Neutrophilia. Patient with Maddrey's DF of≥ 32 will be included in the study, with or without biopsy.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Age < 18 and > 75 years
  2. Hepatocellular carcinoma or portal vein thrombosis
  3. Refusal to participate in the study
  4. Serum creatinine >1.0 mg%
  5. Hepatic encephalopathy- grade 3 or 4
  6. Upper gastrointestinal bleed in last ten days
  7. Uncontrolled bacterial infection
  8. Human immunodeficiency virus, Hepatitis B virus, Hepatitis C virus seropositivity, Autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency
  9. Pregnancy
  10. Glucocorticoid treatment
  11. Significant co-morbidity
  12. Previous known hypersensitivity to G-CSF/NAC

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02971306


Contacts
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Contact: Virendra Singh, MD, DM +911722756338 virendrasingh100@hotmail.com

Locations
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India
Dept of Hepatology, PGIMER Recruiting
Chandigarh, India, 160012
Contact: Virendra Singh, MD, DM    +911722756338    virendrasingh100@hotmail.com   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Dr.Virendra Singh, Professor of Hepatology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02971306     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: G-CSF and NAC in AH
First Posted: November 22, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 19, 2017
Last Verified: September 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Keywords provided by Dr.Virendra Singh, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research:
alcoholic hepatitis
alcoholic liver disease
jaundice
ascites
regeneration

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Hepatitis
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis, Alcoholic
Liver Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Hepatitis, Viral, Human
Virus Diseases
Enterovirus Infections
Picornaviridae Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic
Alcohol-Induced Disorders
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Substance-Related Disorders
Chemically-Induced Disorders
Lenograstim
Acetylcysteine
N-monoacetylcystine
Adjuvants, Immunologic
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Antiviral Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Expectorants
Respiratory System Agents
Free Radical Scavengers
Antioxidants
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Protective Agents
Antidotes