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Death to Onchocerciasis and Lymphatic Filariasis (DOLF) Triple Drug Therapy for Lymphatic Filariasis

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02899936
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : September 14, 2016
Last Update Posted : January 17, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Case Western Reserve University
Indian Council of Medical Research
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Gary Weil, MD, Washington University School of Medicine

Brief Summary:
The DOLF Triple Drug Therapy for Lymphatic Filariasis study will determine the frequency, type and severity of adverse events following triple-drug therapy (IVM+DEC+ALB, IDA) compared to the standard two-drug treatment (DEC+ALB, DA) in infected and uninfected individuals in a community in 5 different countries. The objective is to acquire safety, efficacy, and acceptability data to assess the safety and acceptability of the IDA drug combination.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Lymphatic Filariasis Drug: 3 drug dose - IDA Drug: 2 drug dose - DA Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched the Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) to eliminate lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem by 2020. To interrupt transmission, WHO recommends therapy using combinations of two medicines delivered to entire at-risk populations through a strategy known as mass drug administration. Ivermectin (IVM) and albendazole (ALB) are administered in areas where onchocerciasis is co-endemic; diethylcarbamazine (DEC) and albendazole (ALB) are administered in areas where onchocerciasis is not co-endemic.

Results of a pilot study in Papua New Guinea suggest that triple drug therapy (ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine and albendazole) is superior to the currently recommended two-drug regimen (DEC+ALB, DA). A single dose of the triple therapy (IVM+DEC+ALB, IDA) rapidly achieved complete clearance of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae from the blood of 12 individuals for at least one year post-treatment. All six individuals tested at 24 months were still amicrofilaremic, suggesting that the triple therapy might permanently sterilizes adult filarial worms. Many people treated in these studies experienced transient systemic adverse events commonly associated with diethylcarbamazine or ivermectin treatment of filariasis. Adverse events were more frequent after the triple therapy than after the usual combination of two drugs. However, no serious adverse events were observed. The dramatic reduction and sustained decrease of microfilaria along with the safety profile seen in the Papua New Guinea studies suggest that the triple drug therapy may be a useful tool to achieve the goal of eliminating lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem by 2020.

Although the study cited above has clearly demonstrated the superiority of the triple therapy for clearing W. bancrofti microfilaria from the blood, more safety and efficacy data are needed before triple therapy can be rolled out on a large scale as a mass drug administration regimen in lymphatic filariasis endemic countries. WHO recommends a best practice called "cohort event monitoring" for demonstrating safety of new drug regimens for public health program use. Establishing safety through such methodology requires pre and post treatment assessment from at least 10,000 people treated with the triple therapy across multiple settings.

It is therefore proposed to conduct a cohort event monitoring study to acquire safety data. Efficacy and acceptability components will also be included in the study. Similar studies will be conducted simultaneously in Haiti, India, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Sri Lanka to reach the 10,000 people necessary to assess the safety of this new drug combination.

This will be an open label, two-armed study. The two arms are (1) mass drug administration (MDA) with the currently used combination of two-drug regimen (DA) and (2) MDA with triple drug therapy (IDA).


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 23789 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Community Based Safety Study of 2-drug (Diethylcarbamazine and Albendazole) Versus 3-drug (Ivermectin, Diethylcarbamazine and Albendazole) Therapy for Lymphatic Filariasis
Study Start Date : July 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : July 2018


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: 2 drug dose - DA
Drug treatment with two-drug regimen diethylcarbamazine and albendazole (DA)
Drug: 2 drug dose - DA
Lymphatic Filariasis Mass Drug Administration (MDA) with the currently used standard of care combination drug therapy of diethylcarbamazine, and albendazole (DA)
Other Name: DA

Experimental: 3 drug dose - IDA
Triple-drug regimen Ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine and albendazole (IDA)
Drug: 3 drug dose - IDA
Lymphatic Filariasis Mass Drug Administration (MDA) with triple drug therapy of ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine, and albendazole (IDA)
Other Name: IDA




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of participants with treatment-related adverse events as assessed by modified CTCAE v4.0 scale [ Time Frame: within 7 days of drug administration ]
    To determine the frequency, type and severity of adverse events following triple-drug therapy Ivermectin, Diethylcarbamazine and Albendazole (IVM+DEC+ALB, IDA) compared to the standard two-drug treatment Diethylcarbamazine and Albendazole (DEC+ALB, DA) in infected and uninfected individuals in a community as assessed by modified CTCAE v4.0 scale.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of participants with clearance of microfilaremia (MF) as measured with microfilaremia night blood smear testing (finger prick - 60ul) [ Time Frame: baseline (pre-treatment), within 7 days of drug administration and follow up at 12 months ]
    To compare the efficacy of IDA vs. DA administered in communities for clearance of MF and filarial antigenemia (Ag) in cohort and effectiveness (prevalence) in community settings. A minimum of 21 (70%) of MF-positive participants in each arm will be retested at 12 months post-treatment for antigenemia and microfilaremia. This sample size is adequate to demonstrate superiority of the IDA regimen (assumptions: 90% reduction in MF prevalence after IDA and 60% reduction after DA, 80% power for detecting an effect size of 30%). The primary endpoint for efficacy will be complete clearance of MF 12 months post Mass Drug Administration (MDA). Clearance of filarial antigenemia at 12 months will be a secondary endpoint for the efficacy analysis. Testing of microfilaria is by analyzing 60 microliter (ul) measured volume thick blood smear by finger prick method and results are either positive or negative for MF presence.

  2. Number of participants Filarial Test Strip (FTS) and/or MF positive as tested with FTS and night blood smears with treatment-related adverse events as assessed by modified CTCAE v4.0 scale [ Time Frame: baseline (pre-treatment), within 7 days of drug administration and follow up at 12 months ]
    To assess the presence and intensity of filarial infection on the frequency and severity of adverse events. One year post MDA, all participants who were positive for either microfilaremia or filarial antigenemia during the baseline visit will be tested for filarial antigen using the FTS to assess their response to treatment and to compare the efficacy of the two treatment regimens. Participants with positive FTS will also be tested for nocturnal microfilaremia by blood smear (finger prick - 60ul)

  3. Community acceptance will be measured using on a survey using likert scale questions based on perception of efficacy, intent to participate and relevance of the treatment. [ Time Frame: 6-8 months ]
    Community acceptance will be measured using a survey to community members receiving both the 2-drug and 3-drug treatments during the safety trial. To complement this survey, a series of focus group discussions in the community as well as key informant interviews are proposed with community leaders, health personnel and drug distributors in the same communities to assess perceptions about the 3-drug versus the 2-drug regimen. The community acceptability study will be carried out within one month of the completion of the safety trial. The acceptability score will use a set of likert scale questions based on perception of efficacy, intent to participate and relevance of the treatment. Some of the questions have been inspired by Reimer's Treatment Acceptability Rating form-Revised and general principles of social validity but mostly the questions are not from one particular survey instrument.

  4. Prevalence of STH (hookworm, ascaris, trichuris and strongyloides) as measured by Kato-katz or PCR at baseline and 12 months after treatment [ Time Frame: Stool collected at baseline (pre-treatment), 4 weeks (individual response), and 12 months (community prevalence). ]
    Some sites will include stool sample collections to compare the efficacy of 2 and 3-drug regimens on STH. Stool samples will be analysed using Kato-katz method, as well as PCR.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   2 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

In India:

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Age ≥ 5 years, male or female for IDA arm and age > 2 years for DA arm.
  2. Able to provide informed consent to participate in the trial (forms to be attached)
  3. No evidence of severe or systemic co-morbidities except for features of filarial disease

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Age < 5 years (ivermectin is contraindicated in children below 5 years of age) for IDA arm and age < 2 years for DA arm
  2. Pregnant women (DEC, ivermectin and albendazole are contraindicated in pregnancy)
  3. Severe chronic illness (for example, chronic renal failure, inability to care for oneself with activities of daily living)
  4. History of previous allergy to MDA drugs

For rest of countries:

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Age ≥ 5 years, for IDA and DA arms (males and females).
  2. Able to provide informed consent or give parental consent for minors to participate in the trial
  3. No evidence of severe or systemic co-morbidities except for features of filarial disease

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Age < 5 years (ivermectin is not approved for use in children less than 5 years of age)
  2. Unable to provide informed consent or give parental consent for minors to participate in the trial
  3. Pregnant women (DEC, ivermectin and albendazole are not known to be safe for use during pregnancy)
  4. Severe chronic illness (chronic renal insufficiency, severe chronic liver disease, or any illness that is severe enough to interfere with activities of daily living)
  5. History of previous allergy to MDA drugs

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02899936


Locations
Haiti
Ministere de la Sante Publique et de la Population
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
India
Vector Control Research Centre
Puducherry, India, 605006
Indonesia
Universitas Indonesia
Jakarta, Indonesia
Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea Institute for Medical Research
Madang, Papua New Guinea
Sponsors and Collaborators
Washington University School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Indian Council of Medical Research
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Gary Weil, MD Washington University School of Medicine
Principal Investigator: Christopher King, MD PHD Case Western Reserve University

Publications:
World Health Organization (1997). Elimination of lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem - resolution of the executive board of the WHO.

Responsible Party: Gary Weil, MD, Professor of Medicine/ Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02899936     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 201607068
First Posted: September 14, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 17, 2018
Last Verified: January 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: Datasets used for published results will be shared publically through a journal or other open source data repository so that the broader scientific community can access it. Only de-identified data will be shared publicly.

Keywords provided by Gary Weil, MD, Washington University School of Medicine:
Mass drug administration
Safety Data

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Filariasis
Elephantiasis
Elephantiasis, Filarial
Spirurida Infections
Secernentea Infections
Nematode Infections
Helminthiasis
Parasitic Diseases
Lymphedema
Lymphatic Diseases
Albendazole
Diethylcarbamazine
Ivermectin
Anthelmintics
Antiparasitic Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Anticestodal Agents
Antiplatyhelmintic Agents
Antiprotozoal Agents
Tubulin Modulators
Antimitotic Agents
Mitosis Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Antineoplastic Agents
Filaricides
Antinematodal Agents
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors
Enzyme Inhibitors