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Rates of Recovery From Strenuous Exercise in Physically Active Older Adults

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02899650
Recruitment Status : Terminated (This was a research project that was conducted by a visiting scholar and his time for departure came earlier than the study completion.)
First Posted : September 14, 2016
Results First Posted : January 22, 2021
Last Update Posted : January 22, 2021
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Hirofumi Tanaka, University of Texas at Austin

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study to determine if older adults who are healthy and physically active (i.e., Masters athletes) demonstrate slower rates of recovery from unaccustomed strenuous exercise of downhill running than younger peers.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Muscles Other: exercise Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

There is a well-conceived notion that the recovery from strenuous exercise gets slower as individuals get older in age. Studies using animal models have demonstrated that stretching of electrically-activated skeletal muscle to mimic eccentric muscle contractions results in a greater decline and slower recovery in muscular force in old mice than in young mice. Similarly, in human studies using sedentary adults, age has been associated with a slower rate of recovery from a series of eccentric contractions. However, the process of aging is often confounded by coexisting diseases and gradual sedentary lifestyles that progress with advancing aging. Could older adults who are apparently healthy and habitually exercising demonstrate slower rates of recovery from strenuous exercise? In a small-scale study, recreationally-active middle-aged adults did not display a slower recovery from unaccustomed eccentric exercise than young adults. Masters athletes are an effective experimental model to address this question as extrinsic factors (e.g., deconditioning, chronic degenerative diseases) that often confound the intrinsic aging process can be minimized in this population. As no study has been conducted in Masters athletes, it is unknown if Masters athletes would experience slower rates of recovery similar to their sedentary peers.

With this information as background, the general aim of the proposed study is to determine if older adults who are healthy and physically active demonstrate slower rates of recovery from unaccustomed strenuous exercise of downhill running than younger peers. In an attempt to properly determine the influence of aging and regular physical activity, 4 groups of apparently healthy adults, including young sedentary, young trained, older sedentary, and older trained adults, will be studied.

A total of 60 apparently healthy men and women will serve as subjects. Half will be young [18-40-year-old (n=30)] and the other half older [50-80-year-old (n=30)]. After the screening and familiarization, investigators will ask participants to visit the laboratory four times (four consecutive days) to perform downhill running and to test physiological measurements (muscular strength, pain scale, range of motion, arterial stiffness and blood pressure and blood creatinine and myoglobin concentrations).

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 60 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: Rates of Recovery From Strenuous Exercise in Physically Active Older Adults
Actual Study Start Date : August 1, 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 1, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : September 1, 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Young Fit
Young (18-39 yrs) people who have endurance training habit
Other: exercise
acute downhill running

Experimental: Young Unfit
Young (18-39 yrs) people who have sedentary lifestyle.
Other: exercise
acute downhill running

Experimental: Older Fit
Older (50-80 yrs) people who have endurance training habit
Other: exercise
acute downhill running

Experimental: Older Unfit
Older (50-80 yrs) people who have sedentary lifestyle
Other: exercise
acute downhill running




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Rate of Force Development [ Time Frame: After the downhill running protocol, various markers of muscle damage and muscular strength were obtained 24 hours post (the third visit), 48 hours post (the forth visit) and 72 hours post (the fifth visit). ]
    Rate of force development are measured by determining peak torque achieved on an isometric leg extension machine.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Pain Scale [ Time Frame: After the downhill running protocol, muscle damage pain scale was measured 24 hours post (the third visit), 48 hours post (the forth visit) and 72 hours post (the fifth visit). ]
    Pain scale on quadriceps muscle was assessed using a validated visual pain scale. The scale was on a 10-point scale (0 being absence of soreness, 10 being worst imaginable soreness).



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Sedentary (exercise < 1 time/week) or well-trained individuals (exercise ≧ 2 times/week)
  • Ages 18-39 and 50-80 years
  • Individuals who can safely exercise

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Individuals who reports "Symptoms or Signs Suggestive of Disease" on the Health Research Questionnaire (heart and respiratory problems, dizziness and ankle edema).
  • Individuals who report substance abuse within the last 6 months (elicit drugs, alcohol)
  • Smokers

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02899650


Locations
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United States, Texas
Cardiovascular Aging Research Lab at UT Austin
Austin, Texas, United States, 78712
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Texas at Austin
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Hirofumi Tanaka, University of Texas at Austin:
Additional Information:
Pubmed  This link exits the ClinicalTrials.gov site

Publications:
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Responsible Party: Hirofumi Tanaka, Professor, University of Texas at Austin
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02899650    
Other Study ID Numbers: 2016-04-0070
First Posted: September 14, 2016    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: January 22, 2021
Last Update Posted: January 22, 2021
Last Verified: January 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Hirofumi Tanaka, University of Texas at Austin:
Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness
Eccentric exercise
Masters athlete