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Stepping Up 4 Your Child (4yourchild)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02843113
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : July 25, 2016
Last Update Posted : August 7, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Kentucky Cabinet for Health & Family Services
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Armon R. Perry, University of Louisville

Brief Summary:
Through Stepping Up 4 Your Child, non-custodial fathers will be provided with a comprehensive, solution-oriented program featuring group based parent education and individualized case management to help them achieve financial independence, increase their parenting skills, and develop a co-parenting alliance.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Parenting Education Curriculum Parenting Education Curriculum + Case Management Waiting List Control Behavioral: 4 Your Child Program Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Fathers' involvement in their children's lives has received increased attention in recent years. In response, support has grown for responsible fatherhood programs aimed at improving the quantity and quality of fathers' involvement. Research on these programs has concluded that factors such as fathers' parenting skills, co-parenting relationship quality, and socioeconomic status all impact fathers' ability to contribute to their children's growth and development. Using this previous research as a foundation, the Stepping Up 4 Your Child project will go beyond traditional fatherhood initiatives by integrating the provision of responsible parenting, economic stability, and relationship education services to fathers at risk for paternal disengagement. To do so, the University of Louisville's Kent School of Social Work will leverage its existing relationship with the Kentucky Office of Child Support Enforcement. Specifically, through Stepping Up 4 Your Child, non-custodial fathers will be provided with a comprehensive, solution-oriented program featuring group based parent education and individualized case management to help them achieve financial independence, increase their parenting skills, and develop a co-parenting alliance. Given that each of these focus areas have all been cited as three of the strongest predictors of paternal engagement, Stepping Up 4 Your Child and the results of its evaluation will have significant implications for the families it serves, as well as the practitioners, researchers, and policymakers interested in responsible fatherhood. 1

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 1560 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Stepping Up 4 Your Child: The Impact of an Educational Program and Social Case Work Involvement on Single Fathers
Actual Study Start Date : July 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : September 2020

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Parenting

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: 4 Your Child Program
Program integrates the provision of responsible parenting, economic stability, and relationship education services to fathers at risk for paternal disengagement.
Behavioral: 4 Your Child Program
Integrates the provision of responsible parenting, economic stability, and relationship education services to fathers at risk for paternal disengagement.

Experimental: 4 Your Child + Case Management
Participants assigned to treatment group that includes case management will receive an initial assessment to determine their strengths and needs. The participant will then work collaboratively with their case manager to connect to community resources to meet his needs. To do so, the case manager will meet with the participant using the following schedule: Months 1-2: intervention in the form of weekly face-to-face meeting with a case manager, plus a weekly phone call from a case manager; Months 3-4: intervention in the form of face-to-face meeting every other week, plus a weekly phone call; Months 5-6: intervention in the form of face-to-face meeting once a month, plus a weekly phone call.
Behavioral: 4 Your Child Program
Integrates the provision of responsible parenting, economic stability, and relationship education services to fathers at risk for paternal disengagement.

No Intervention: Waiting list control
Individuals who are randomly assigned to this condition will receive no treatment for a period of months in parallel with the experimental intervention conditions. Data will be gathered from them, and they will be randomly assigned to a treatment condition when possible.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Fathering Knowledge and Skills. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    Fathering knowledge and skills will be measured using the 24/7 Dad Fathering Skills Survey (National Fatherhood Initiative, 2010). This survey has 25 items that are multiple choice response questions. This survey comes with the 24/7 Dad curriculum packet. Given that this survey is a measure of fathering knowledge and not a standardized scale, no reliability data are available.

  2. Change in Fathers' Parenting Behavior. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    Fathers' reported parenting behavior will be measured using the Index of Father Involvement (Hawkins et al., 2002). This measure has 9 factors loaded as subscales designed to tap direct and indirect forms of involvement and a total of 26 items. All items are measured on a 5 point scale ranging from A (excellent) to F (failing). The measure has a reported reliability/internal consistency score of .69

  3. Change in Child Support Compliance. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    These payment data will be obtained via reports from the Kentucky Office of Child Support Enforcement.

  4. Change in Co-Parenting Relationship Quality. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    Co-Parenting Relationship Quality. Co-parenting relationship quality will be measured using the Co-parenting Questionnaire (CQ, Margolis, Gordis, & John, 2001). This measure is a 14-item self-report instrument examining: 1) the amount of conflict between parents surrounding parenting issues, 2) cooperation as the extent to which mothers and fathers support, value, and respect each other as parents and the degree to which they ease one another's parenting burden, and 3) triangulation, the extent to which parents distort parent-child boundaries by attempting to form a coalition with the child that undermines or excludes the other parent. The 14 items form a three factor structure and have good internal consistency with alphas for the 3 factors and the total scale ranging from .69 to .87.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Conflict Resolution Skills. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    The Stanley-Markman Relationship Dynamics Scale (Renick et al, 1992) will be used to measure conflict resolution skills. This measure has reported Chronbach's alpha levels of .73 and .81 (Stanley et al, 2006) and strong predictive validity for relationship failure.

  2. Change in Communication Skills. [ Time Frame: immediate after intervention, at 3 months later and at 6 months later ]
    Communication skills will be measured through the Communication Patterns Questionnaire to assess communication skills. This measure has strong discriminant validity and Chronbach's alpha levels ranging from .73 to .88 (Noller & White, 1990).



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years to 105 Years   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • non-custodial father AND
  • age 16-24 OR
  • age 24 up + low income OR
  • age 24 up + child support payment delinquent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • female
  • custodial father
  • male but not a father
  • younger than age 16

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02843113


Contacts
Contact: Armon R Perry, Ph.D. 502-852-3234 arperr01@exchange.louisville.edu
Contact: Cheri N Langley, Ph.D. 502-852-5555 cnholm01@exchange.louisville.edu

Locations
United States, Kentucky
Recruiting
Elizabethtown, Kentucky, United States, 42701
University of Louisville Recruiting
Louisville, Kentucky, United States, 40292
Contact: Armon Perry, PhD         
Principal Investigator: Armon Perry, PhD         
Recruiting
Owensboro, Kentucky, United States, 42302
Recruiting
Owenton, Kentucky, United States, 40359
Recruiting
Paducah, Kentucky, United States, 42003
Recruiting
Sandy Hook, Kentucky, United States, 41171
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Louisville
Kentucky Cabinet for Health & Family Services

Responsible Party: Armon R. Perry, Associate Professor, University of Louisville
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02843113     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: OGMB160035
First Posted: July 25, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 7, 2017
Last Verified: August 2017

Keywords provided by Armon R. Perry, University of Louisville:
single father
parenting behavior