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How Parents Can Help Babies Learn to Talk With Picture Books.

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified August 2016 by Danielle Matthews, University of Sheffield
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02780557
First Posted: May 23, 2016
Last Update Posted: August 9, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Danielle Matthews, University of Sheffield
  Purpose
The aim of this project is to test whether giving parents advice about book reading is effective in promoting language learning for infants from a range of socio-economic backgrounds.

Condition Intervention
Language Development Behavioral: Contingent Reading Intervention Behavioral: Book Provision Control

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: A Randomised Control Trial to Test the Effect of Parent Contingent Talk During Shared Book Reading on Infant Language Learning.

Further study details as provided by Danielle Matthews, University of Sheffield:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in infant expressive vocabulary [ Time Frame: Baseline: 11 months, outcome: 15 months ]
    Parents will complete a standardised assessment of vocabulary, the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory (CDI).


Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in caregiver reported frequency of reading [ Time Frame: Baseline: 11 months, outcome: 15 months ]
    Parents will complete a questionnaire about how frequently they read with their child.

  • Infant Real Time Language Understanding: Accuracy [ Time Frame: 15 months ]
    Infants' real-time comprehension of familiar words will be assessed at 15 months using the looking-while-listening (LWL) procedure (Fernald et al., 2008). Infants will sit in front of a computer screen with a picture on either side of it (e.g., a bottle and a shoe). We will measure the accuracy with which they look to the correct picture upon hearing a word that describes it.

  • Infant Real Time Language Understanding: Reaction Time [ Time Frame: 15 months ]
    Infants' real-time comprehension of familiar words will be assessed at 15 months using the looking-while-listening (LWL) procedure (Fernald et al., 2008). We will measure the time it takes the child to look from a distractor to the target.


Other Outcome Measures:
  • Change in caregiver contingent talk while book reading [ Time Frame: Baseline: 11 months, outcome: 15 months ]
    Video recordings of dyads reading books will be analysed for quantity of caregiver contingent talk.


Estimated Enrollment: 140
Study Start Date: June 2016
Estimated Study Completion Date: March 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date: December 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Contingent Reading Intervention Behavioral: Contingent Reading Intervention
Caregivers will be provided with 6 picture books. They will be trained to use contingent talk when looking at picture books with their infants. They will be asked to spend 10 mintues each day engaging in contingent talk while looking at picture books. The intervention will run for 4 months. Parents will be asked to keep a daily reading diary.
Book Provision Control Behavioral: Book Provision Control
Caregivers will be provided with 6 picture books. They will not be trained to read with their child. They will receive information from other sources (e.g. health visitors and Book Start schemes) as normal.

Detailed Description:
Children from disadvantaged families tend to have limited language skills compared to their advantaged peers. While many factors contribute to language ability, two aspects of the early caregiving environment are known to be correlated with child language outcomes 1) caregiver-child book reading and 2) caregiver contingent talk. Contingent talk refers to a style of communication whereby the caregiver talks about what is in their infant's current focus of attention. This style of talking can be facilitated when parents read books with their babies. The aim of this research is to establish whether asking parents to engage in contingent talk in the context of book reading promotes vocabulary learning. This study will compare the effects of an intervention to promote contingent talk against a control where parents are given books but not given any training in how to read them in a contingent manner. The study will include children from socio-economically advantaged and disadvantaged families.
  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   11 Months to 11 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Infants must be:

  • first born and singletons
  • full term (i.e. born no more than 3 weeks prematurely)
  • with birth weight over 2.5 kg.

Primary caregivers must:

  • work less than 24 hours per week (i.e., be the caregiver the child spends most time with)
  • be raising their child as monolingual English speakers.

Exclusion criteria:

Neither caregivers nor infants must have any significant known physical, mental or learning disability.

  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02780557


Contacts
Contact: Danielle E Matthews, PhD 00 44 114 222 6548 danielle.matthews@sheffield.ac.uk
Contact: Michelle L McGillion, PhD 00 44 114 222 6502 m.l.mcgillion@sheffield.ac.uk

Locations
United Kingdom
University of Sheffield Recruiting
Sheffield, South Yorkshire, United Kingdom, S10 2TN
Contact: Danielle E Matthews, PhD    0114 222 6548    danielle.matthews@sheffield.ac.uk   
Contact: Michelle L McGillion, PhD    0114 222 6502    m.l.mcgillion@sheffield.ac.uk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Sheffield
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Danielle E Matthews, PhD University of Sheffield
  More Information

Responsible Party: Danielle Matthews, Reader in Cognitive Development, University of Sheffield
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02780557     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R/139470-11-1-INFANCY
First Submitted: May 19, 2016
First Posted: May 23, 2016
Last Update Posted: August 9, 2016
Last Verified: August 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: With participants' permission, IPD will be archived in accordance with the guidelines of the University of Sheffield, the UK Data Archive and the ESRC's Research Data Policy.

Keywords provided by Danielle Matthews, University of Sheffield:
Vocabulary
Book reading
Infancy
Parenting