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PCORI Urea Cycle Disorder Study

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02740153
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 15, 2016
Results First Posted : January 26, 2021
Last Update Posted : January 26, 2021
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS)
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
George Washington University
The National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation
Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Nicholas Ah Mew, Children's National Research Institute

Brief Summary:

Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are genetic disorders caused by the liver's inability to break down ammonia from proteins; ammonia then accumulates and is toxic to the brain. UCD cause brain damage and intellectual and developmental disabilities and even death.

Treatment for UCD is either conservative management which involves a low-in-protein diet, drugs, and amino acid supplements or liver transplantation; each carries their own risks.

This study aims to help patients to make the decision about different management alternatives by providing them with scientific information that is currently lacking.

Aim 1 of this study will compare survival, neurocognitive function, and patient-reported quality of life.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Urea Cycle Disorders Other: No Intervention Given

Detailed Description:

Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are genetic disorders caused by the liver's inability to break down ammonia from proteins; ammonia then accumulates and is toxic to the brain. UCD cause brain damage and intellectual and developmental disabilities and even death.

Treatment involves a special diet low in protein, drugs that help metabolize ammonia and amino acid supplements (conservative management). Many patients and families choose liver transplantation rather than conservative treatment; both alternatives are effective in reducing or normalizing blood ammonia. While liver transplantation eliminates the ammonia problem, conservative management does so only temporarily and in many patients, blood ammonia can rise during an infection.

The long-term objective of this study is to help patients make decisions about management alternatives (conservative vs. liver transplantation) by providing them with scientific information that is currently lacking. The questions the investigators will address are:

  1. What is the disease's risk of mortality and illness in the two treatment approaches?
  2. What can parents expect in terms of the development of their child and his/her school performance?
  3. What are the expected effects of each treatment on short-term and long-term quality of life?

The investigators will use statistical methods to compare numbers or percentages of survival, illness, psychological testing for IQ, executive function, memory, behaviors, and quality of life among patients that choose conservative management and those who have chosen liver transplantation. Some of this information is already being collected by the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium (UCDC) in 14 metabolic clinics (11 of them in the US) as part of its long-term follow-up study. To ensure that the information the investigators analyze is representative of the UCD patient population in the US, the investigators will also obtain data from the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation (SPLIT) registry, which collects information about children who undergo liver transplantation for many different diseases (including UCD).

The National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation (NUCDF) and the Patients' Research Working Group collaborated with the clinical investigators to design this research and to ensure that it that it covers the questions that are most important to patients and their families. The results of this study will be disseminated to patients, their doctors, and clinical staff so they receive current, validated information before making a decision about the best treatment for them.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 187 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: Comparative Effectiveness of Therapy in Rare Diseases: Liver Transplantation vs. Conservative Management of Urea Cycle Disorders
Actual Study Start Date : March 4, 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 10, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : June 30, 2020


Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Urea Cycle Disorder with Liver Transplant
  • Age 18 and under
  • Diagnosed with the following Neonatal-type urea cycle disorders: CPSD, OTCD, ASD or ALD
  • History of liver transplant
Other: No Intervention Given
Urea Cycle Disorder without Transplant
  • Age 18 and under
  • Diagnosed with the following Neonatal-type urea cycle disorders: CPSD, OTCD, ASD or ALD
  • No history of liver transplant, managed medically
Other: No Intervention Given



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Mortality [ Time Frame: 436 person years in the Liver Transplant Group and 386 person-years in the Without Transplant Group ]
    This aspect of Aim 1 is prospective by design based on selection by exposure (liver transplant or medical managed) evaluating the clinical outcomes of subjects with urea cycle disorders.

  2. Neurocognitive Function: Full-Scale IQ [ Time Frame: Neuropsychological testing was conducted once for each patient at baseline during the study on age-matched norms for the specific test used. ]

    Neuropsychological tests were based on age-matched norms for the specific test used. All neurocognitive scores have been standardized to the following: norm, mean of 100, and sd of 15. In all tests higher scores are interpreted as higher functions. The WPPSI and WASI were combined to create a single measure of Full-Scale IQ.

    Full-Scale IQ

    • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scales of Intelligence, 4th edition (WPPSI-IV: Children 3-5 years of age)
    • Wechsler Abbreviated Scales of Intelligence, 1st and 2nd editions (WASI-I & II: Persons 6+ years of age)

  3. Total Quality of Life [ Time Frame: Quality of life testing was conducted and reported at baseline for each patient during the study. ]

    Quality of life assessments are self-reported by participating patients or by their parent/caretaker using the following reports:

    Pediatric Family Impact (PedsQL), Version 4 is reported as a total score

    All were scored on a 0-100 scale. Higher scores indicated a better health-related quality of life




Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   up to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population
The study population for Aim 1 includes children aged 18 and younger who are diagnosed with one of the following Neonatal-type urea cycle disorders: CPSD, OTCD, ASD, or ALD. Participants will come from children's hospitals and pediatric clinics that treat urea cycle disorders throughout the country.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Aim 1 (UCD patients):

  • Age 18 and under
  • Diagnosed with the following Neonatal-type urea cycle disorders:
  • CPSD, OTCD, ASD or ALD, as defined as follows:

    • Diagnosis of CPS I deficiency, defined as decreased (less than 20 % of control) CPS I enzyme activity in liver, and/or an identified pathogenic mutation, and/or hyperammonemia and first-degree relative meets at least one of the criteria for CPS I deficiency
    • Diagnosis of OTC deficiency, defined as the identification of a pathogenic mutation, and/or less than 20% of control of OTC activity in the liver, and/or elevated urinary orotate (greater than 20 uM/mM) in a random urine sample or after allopurinol challenge test, and/or hyperammonemia and first degree relative meets at least one of the criteria for OTC deficiency
    • Diagnosis of AS deficiency (Citrullinemia), defined as a greater than or equal to 10-fold elevation of citrulline in plasma, and/or decreased (less than 20% of control) AS enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts or other appropriate tissue, and/or identification of a pathogenic mutation in the AS gene, and/or hyperammonemia and first degree relative meets at least one of the criteria for AS Deficiency
    • Diagnosis of AL deficiency (Argininosuccinic Aciduria, ASA), defined as the presence of argininosuccinic acid in the blood or urine, and/or decreased (less than 20% of control) AL enzyme activity in cultured skin fibroblasts or other appropriate tissue, and/or identification of a pathogenic mutation in the AL gene, and/or hyperammonemia and first degree relative meets at least one of the criteria for AL Deficiency
  • Willing to participate in at least 1 neurocognitive assessment and 1 quality of life assessment
  • Permit access to medical records and medical providers

Exclusion Criteria:

Aim 1:

  • Rare and unrelated comorbidities (e.g., Down's syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage in the newborn period, and extreme prematurity)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02740153


Locations
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United States, District of Columbia
Childrens Research Institute
Washington, District of Columbia, United States, 20010
Sponsors and Collaborators
Children's National Research Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS)
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
George Washington University
The National Urea Cycle Disorders Foundation
Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation
Investigators
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Study Chair: Mendel Tuchman, MD Children's National Research Institute
Principal Investigator: Nicholas Ah Mew, MD Children's National Research Institute
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Nicholas Ah Mew, Children's National Research Institute:
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Responsible Party: Nicholas Ah Mew, MD, Children's National Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02740153    
Other Study ID Numbers: 7282
First Posted: April 15, 2016    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: January 26, 2021
Last Update Posted: January 26, 2021
Last Verified: January 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Urea Cycle Disorders, Inborn
Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn
Brain Diseases, Metabolic
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Metabolic Diseases