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The Impact of Family Financial Support on Cognition

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02723318
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 30, 2016
Last Update Posted : October 26, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Adam Schickedanz, University of California, Los Angeles

Brief Summary:
The investigators have partnered with financial coaching organizations to establish what the investigators have termed a "Medical-Financial Partnership (MFP)" that offers financial coaching to improve financial and mental health. The investigators will evaluate the MFP's impact on cognition using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Cognition Short form 8a.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Impaired Cognition Behavioral: Financial Coaching Behavioral: Access to Referrals to Social Services Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Financial coaching is a new tool in the field of community development, but it has already demonstrated significant financial impact in a number of studies, including one randomized trial conducted by the Urban Institute. Financial coaching improves participant financial literacy, budgeting, saving for financial emergencies, and debt level. The investigators' project will help clinicians and the field of community economic development understand health and well-being through a new economic lens and assess the health-related impacts of the emerging field of financial coaching. The investigators have partnered with financial coaching organizations to establish what they have termed a "Medical-Financial Partnership (MFP)" that offers financial coaching to improve financial and mental health. The investigators will evaluate the MFP's impact on cognition using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Cognitive Abilities Short Form.

Community-based participants will be recruited from South Los Angeles and randomized to receive either monthly financial coaching plus access to referral for social services (intervention) or access to referral for social services alone (control). Inclusion criteria include having dependents under age 18, having some form of income, and having a tax identification number (social security number or Individual tax identification number). Participants will be surveyed quarterly regarding their cognition using the PROMIS Cognitive Abilities Short Form 8-item survey.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 150 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: The Impact of Family Financial Support on Cognition
Study Start Date : March 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : October 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : October 2017

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Financia Coaching & Social Services Referrals
Enrollment in one-to-one financial coaching intervention to support savings, income, and credit while reducing debt using available tools in the community development field.
Behavioral: Financial Coaching
One-to-one financial coaching intervention to support savings, income, and credit while reducing debt using available tools in the community development field.

Behavioral: Access to Referrals to Social Services
Active Comparator: Social Services
Enrollment in the control arm offers access to social services referrals.
Behavioral: Access to Referrals to Social Services



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Cognition [ Time Frame: Up to one year (if possible) ]
    Cognitive abilities will be assessed using the PROMIS Cognitive Abilities Survey short form 8a



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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants will be included if they are caregivers/parents of one or more dependents, have some form of income, and have a tax identification number.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to take part in financial coaching due to disability or primary language other than English or Spanish.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02723318


Locations
United States, California
LIFT-LA
Los Angeles, California, United States, 90007
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, Los Angeles
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Adam Schickedanz, MD University of California, Los Angeles

Responsible Party: Adam Schickedanz, Clinical Instructor in Pediatrics and Clinical Scholar, University of California, Los Angeles
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02723318     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UCLASchickedanzFCCog
First Posted: March 30, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 26, 2017
Last Verified: October 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Plan Description: Participant consent did not include data sharing and there is no appropriate repository for data to be shared through.

Keywords provided by Adam Schickedanz, University of California, Los Angeles:
Cognition
Financial Coaching
Social Determinants of Health
Socioeconomic Status

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition Disorders
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders