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Social Media Markers of Adolescents' Suicide Hazard (SMMASH)

This study is not yet open for participant recruitment.
Verified March 2016 by Sinead Nugent, British Columbia Children's Hospital
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02719275
First Posted: March 25, 2016
Last Update Posted: March 25, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sinead Nugent, British Columbia Children's Hospital
  Purpose

Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for teenage youth in Canada, and every year tens of thousands of young people engage in suicidal behaviors. Many young people manifest red-flag behaviors in the digital realm before these incidents occur. The faceless nature of online communication often emboldens youth to reveal details about their mental state: leaving tell-tale signs or "bread crumbs" of their suicidal intentions or behaviors.

This research will examine the content of adolescents social media entries to find red flags and detect patterns in social media interactions of adolescents that could be predictive of subsequent suicide risk. The study participants will be patients admitted to Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Emergency unit at BCCH, subdivided into two groups: those admitted due to suicidal behaviors, and those admitted for non-suicidal behaviors. The text of social media activity for the month prior to emergency admission of the two groups will be collected, anonymized, and analyzed using text-analytic algorithms. The objective of the study is to find patterns and indicators of social media entries, prior to admission, that would have been predictive of suicidality.

The implications of successful outcome of this project for mental health care of children and adolescents reaches well beyond the scope of this study. An objective method to predict risk of suicidal behaviors in youth has application in almost all pediatric clinical settings. The outcomes of this project will also serve as the foundation for further utilization of social sensing technology to identify, predict, and prevent many other mental health crises in children and adolescents.


Condition Intervention
Adolescent Suicidality Behavioral: Social Media Monitoring

Study Type: Observational
Study Design: Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Social Media Markers of Adolescents' Suicide Hazard

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Sinead Nugent, British Columbia Children's Hospital:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Algorithm development to predict suicidal crisis. [ Time Frame: 10 months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Potential Predictors of crisis. [ Time Frame: 10 months ]

Estimated Enrollment: 200
Study Start Date: April 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date: April 2017 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Groups/Cohorts Assigned Interventions
Suicidal Behaviour Behavioral: Social Media Monitoring
Retrospective analyses of social media activity prior to crisis.
Suicidal Ideation Behavioral: Social Media Monitoring
Retrospective analyses of social media activity prior to crisis.
Other Mental Health Behavioral: Social Media Monitoring
Retrospective analyses of social media activity prior to crisis.
Other Health Behavioral: Social Media Monitoring
Retrospective analyses of social media activity prior to crisis.

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   12 Years to 17 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population
We aim to recruit a total of 200 subjects in the four different arms of the study. First arm: 50 adolescents admitted to CAPE because of potentially lethal suicidal behavior. This group consists of patients whose suicidal behavior could have ended their lives or significantly compromised their health in the absence of timely interception or intervention. We use this cohort as a proxy for "would be" completers. Second arm: 50 adolescents admitted to CAPE because of non-lethal suicidal behavior. This group includes patients who are admitted because of suicidal ideation without any attempt, or suicidal behaviors that would not have ended their lives or caused significant compromise in their health. Third arm: 50 adolescents admitted to CAPE due to mental health crises other than suicidal behavior. Fourth arm: 50 adolescents admitted to BCCH for reasons not related to mental health.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • use social media
  • patient of BCCH

Exclusion Criteria:

  • no use of social media
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02719275


Contacts
Contact: Sinead M Nugent, M.Sc (604) 875-2345 ext 6685 sinead.nugent@cw.bc.ca

Sponsors and Collaborators
Sinead Nugent
  More Information

Responsible Party: Sinead Nugent, Ms. Sinead Nugent, British Columbia Children's Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02719275     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: H16-00524
First Submitted: March 21, 2016
First Posted: March 25, 2016
Last Update Posted: March 25, 2016
Last Verified: March 2016

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Suicide
Self-Injurious Behavior
Behavioral Symptoms