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Airway Effects of Tiotropium in Patients With COPD

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02683668
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified August 2016 by Imperial College London.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : February 17, 2016
Last Update Posted : November 7, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Boehringer Ingelheim
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Imperial College London

Brief Summary:
The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of tiotropium from different devices on a panel of small (IOS, MBNW, DLCO, FVC) and large airway (FEV1, PEF) responses in patients with mild-moderate COPD. Comparisons will be made between Tiotropium Handihaler 18 micrograms once daily and Tiotropium Respimat 5 micrograms once daily

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
COPD LUNG DISEASES, OBSTRUCTIVE Device: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg untrained Device: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg trained Device: Respimat-Tiotropium 5 mcg trained Phase 4

Detailed Description:

Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive airways disease (COPD) undergo routine testing of their lung function in the diagnosis, progression, management and, response to treatment of their disease. Standard lung function obtains measurements based on the forced flow of air moving within the airways. Such measurements give a reasonable assessment of disease affecting the large airways, but not an accurate estimate of small airways disease. Small airways are less than 2mm in diameter. However, both asthma and COPD have disease that involves not only the large but also the small airways that has important clinical consequences. Indeed, COPD predominantly affects the small airways.

Tiotropium (Spiriva, Boehringer Ingelheim), a long-acting inhaled anticholinergic bronchodilator, improves lung function, quality of life, and exercise endurance and reduces exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Respimat Soft MistTM Inhaler (SMI) is a novel inhaler delivering a unique slow-moving Soft MistTM that allows gentle inhalation - making it easy to inhale. Importantly it has drug particles that are ~ 2microns that allow an increase in the total lung deposition of drug (~52%) and also the potential for penetration to treat the small and large airways in patients with COPD; that is targeting the whole airway tree.

RESEARCH AIM & HYPOTHESIS The aim is to investigate the effect of tiotropium from different devices on a panel of small (IOS, MBNW, DLCO, FVC) and large airway (FEV1, PEF) responses in patients with mild-moderate COPD. The investigators will compare Tiotropium Handihaler 18 micrograms once daily with Tiotropium Respimat 5 micrograms once daily.

The investigators will identify a COPD cohort with ongoing symptoms or exercise limitation on HandiHaler, as proposed. The science behind this is why are people still limited (even if partially as determined using the CAT score) and is more distal airway targeting necessary? This doesn't necessarily mean targeting the acinar/alveolar beyond the terminal bronchioles, but just a little bit deeper into the distal conducting airway. This can be achieved with Respimat.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 44 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Targeting of the Small Airways in Patients With COPD: Airway Effects of Tiotropium - Respimat vs Handihaler
Study Start Date : February 2016
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2016
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg untrained
Patients receiving Handihaler who have not been trained (real-life use) for over 3 months on its use. Here the investigators want to see that if patients have on-going symptoms but are on Handihaler-Tiotropium 18mcg what is happening PRIOR to proper inhaler technique training - that is their 'real-life' use of the inhaler - to their lung function (large and small airways) and also symptoms or exercise limitation (determined by CAT score) will already be recorded as entry criteria
Device: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg untrained
We are looking at the untrained used of Handihaler

Experimental: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg trained
Patients will be trained in their use of Handihaler-Tiotropium and asked to take 18 mcg once daily for 14 days to see if their (i) airway lung function and or (ii) clinical symptoms improve. Here the investigators want to see what happens AFTER proper inhaler technique training on large and small airways lung function and also symptoms or exercise limitation (determined by CAT score)
Device: Handihaler-Tiotropium 18 mcg trained
We are looking at the trained use of Handihaler after 14 days treatment

Experimental: Respimat-Tiotropium 5 mcg trained
Patients will be switched to trained Respimat Tiotropium 5 mcg once daily for 14 days to see if their (i) airway lung function and or (ii) clinical symptoms improve. Here the investigators want to see what happens AFTER this efficient device Respimat (trained) compared to PREVIOUS device Handihaler (trained) on large and small airways lung function and also symptoms or exercise limitation (determined by CAT score). The investigators want to see if the properties of the Respimat device with deeper lung deposition (slow velocity and small particles) can improve small airway measures (and indeed large airway measures) that might also be related to an improvement in symptoms.
Device: Respimat-Tiotropium 5 mcg trained
we are looking at the trained use of Respimat after 14 days treatment




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Impulse oscillometry measure of (IOS), R5, R20 & R5-R20 [ Time Frame: Baseline & 3 hours post dose ]
    The change between airways resistance (R5 & R20) at baseline and 3 hours post dose & between Visit 0 and Visit1 and Visit 2 will be measured.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Multi−Breath Washout Test (MBW), Sacin, Scond & LCI [ Time Frame: Baseline & 3 hours post dose ]
    The change between MBW parameters (Scond & Sacin & LCI) at baseline and 3 hours post dose & between Visit 0 and Visit1 and Visit 2 will be measured

  2. Lung Function (FEV1, FVC, PEF) [ Time Frame: Baseline & 3 hours post dose ]
    The change between lung function parameters parameters FEV1, FVC & PEF at baseline and 3 hours post dose & between Visit 0 and Visit1 and Visit 2 will be measured



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. COPD patients with FEV1/FVC <70% predicted.
  2. Mild (GOLD stage I: FEV1 >80% pred.) to moderate (GOLD stage II: FEV1 50-80% pred.)
  3. Aged 30 years onwards - there is no upper age limit as we do not want to exclude elderly patients as COPD is primarily a disease in the elderly population.
  4. Have on-going symptoms or exercise limitation (determined by CAT score)
  5. Stable COPD (no chest infection requiring antibiotics and/or oral steroids in the past 2 months).
  6. Capable of giving informed consent, which includes compliance with the requirements and restrictions listed in the consent form.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Subjects who lack the capacity to consent will not be recruited.
  2. Current or past diagnosis of asthma.
  3. Patients on concurrent oral bronchodilators (theophylline, PDE4 inhibitors) will not be included.
  4. Patients on other LAMAs will not be included
  5. History of any chronic respiratory diseases other than COPD.
  6. History of another medical condition, which in the opinion of the Unit Physician, contraindicates his/her participation in the study.
  7. Clinical evidence of heart failure (NYHA class III-IV).
  8. Unstable respiratory disease in the last four weeks prior to the screening visit (indicated by any change in their maintenance inhaled therapy or who have had a lower respiratory tract infection in the previous four weeks).
  9. Evidence of a respiratory exacerbation requiring emergency room treatment and/or hospitalisation within four weeks before screening.
  10. Use of systemic (oral or intravenous) steroids 4 weeks prior to inclusion (injectable depot steroids 6 weeks) or more than 3 periods during the last 12 months.
  11. Participants with a known or suspected allergy, sensitivity or intolerance to the study drugs (this will be asked directly at the screening visit) or patients with a history of another drug allergy which, in the opinion of the Unit Physician, contraindicates his/her participation in the study.
  12. Patients with known or suspected cardiac rhythm disorders
  13. Patients treated with beta-blockers in the week preceding the screening visit and during the study period.
  14. Females who are pregnant or lactating or are likely to become pregnant during the trial. (a urine pregnancy test will be performed. Women of childbearing potential may be included in the study if, in the opinion of the investigator, they are taking adequate contraceptive precautions.
  15. Patients who have evidence of alcohol or substance abuse.
  16. Participation in another clinical trial with an investigational drug in the four weeks preceding the screening visit.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02683668


Contacts
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Contact: Omar Usmani 02073518051 o.usmani@imperial.ac.uk
Contact: Martyn Biddiscombe, PhD 02073518053 m.biddiscombe@imperial.ac.uk

Locations
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United Kingdom
Asthma Lab, Royal Brompton Hospital Recruiting
London, United Kingdom, SW36LY
Contact: Omar Dr Usmani    02073518051    o.usmani@imperial.ac.uk   
Contact: Martyn Dr Biddiscombe    02073518053    m.biddiscombe@imperial.ac.uk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Imperial College London
Boehringer Ingelheim
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Omar Usmani Imperial College London

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Responsible Party: Imperial College London
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02683668     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 151C2697
First Posted: February 17, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 7, 2016
Last Verified: August 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Imperial College London:
Inhalers
Tiotropium
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Lung Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Tiotropium Bromide
Bronchodilator Agents
Autonomic Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Anti-Asthmatic Agents
Respiratory System Agents
Parasympatholytics
Cholinergic Antagonists
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action