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Functional Outcomes of Stay Strong Stay Healthy Program

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02677363
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 9, 2016
Last Update Posted : April 3, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Missouri-Columbia

Brief Summary:
Strength training can increase muscle mass and strength while improving bone density and reducing risk for osteoporosis and related fractures. Strength training can also lead to reduced risk for diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, depression, and obesity; and improves self-confidence, sleep and vitality. Research demonstrates that strength training is extremely effective in helping aging adults with chronic conditions prevent further onset of disease and, in many instances, actually reverse the disease process. In Stay Strong, Stay Healthy Program elderly subjects perform resistance exercise training (RET) twice every week. Past literature suggests that resistance training improved muscle activity, muscle strength, muscle mass, and bone mineral density and total body composition, and adiponectin, insulin sensitivity, fasting blood-glucose (BG), HbA1c1 (long-term marker of BG), blood pressure (BP), blood triglycerides (TGs) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) in healthy and diabetic subjects. The purpose of this study is to measure the changes in the above discussed variables after 8-weeks of resistance exercises.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Quality of Life Aging Memory Loss Cardiovascular Diseases Other: Resistance Exercise Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Participants will perform resistance exercise for 8 weeks and measurements (anthropometric, electromyography, pulse wave velocity, strength test, dual x-ray absorptiometry, blood enzymes/hormones, and sleep, diet, memory surveys) will be performed pre- and post-exercise program.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Functional Outcomes of Stay Strong, Stay Healthy Program
Study Start Date : February 2016
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Older adults
Participants 60 and above aged (both females and males) will perform one hour of resistance exercise twice weekly for 8 weeks.
Other: Resistance Exercise
Participants 60 and above aged (both females and males) will perform one hour of resistance exercise twice weekly for 8 weeks.
Other Name: Strength training




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Muscle electrical activity [ Time Frame: Change in muscle electrical activity in 8 weeks in response to resistance exercise program ]
    Measurement of muscle electrical activity is made using electromyography technique at baseline and after 8 weeks of resistance exercise.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Exert muscle power/strength [ Time Frame: Change in muscle power/strength in 8 weeks in response to resistance exercise program ]
    Measurement of muscle power/strength is made using hand dynamometer at baseline and after 8 weeks of resistance exercise.

  2. Muscle mass loss [ Time Frame: Change in muscle mass in 8 weeks in response to resistance exercise program ]
    Changes in the muscle mass is made using dual x-ray absorptiometry technique at baseline and after 8 weeks of resistance exercise.

  3. Ability to think or remember [ Time Frame: Changes in thinking and cognitive abilities in 8 weeks in response to resistance exercise program ]
    Changes in ability to think or remember is measured by using standard survey (Self Administered Gerocognitive Exam Form -1) at baseline and after 8 weeks of resistance exercise.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   60 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 60 or above
  • Enrollment in Stay Strong Stay Healthy Program
  • Strength training < 2 hours/week for past 3 months

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Not enrolled in Stay Strong Stay Healthy Program
  • Strength training > 2 hours/week for past 3 months
  • Donated more than 463 ml of blood in past 8 weeks
  • Physician discouraged to participate

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02677363


Locations
United States, Missouri
University of Missouri-Columbia
Columbia, Missouri, United States, 65211
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Missouri-Columbia
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Stephen D Ball, PhD University of Missouri-Columbia

Publications of Results:
Other Publications:

Responsible Party: University of Missouri-Columbia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02677363     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 208531
First Posted: February 9, 2016    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 3, 2018
Last Verified: April 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Keywords provided by University of Missouri-Columbia:
Elderly
Older
Adults
Resistant Exercise
Strength Training
Cognitive function

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Cardiovascular Diseases
Memory Disorders
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms