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Trial record 4 of 5 for:    "Quadriplegia" | "Bronchodilator Agents"

24hr Effects of Tiotropium Bromide in Tetraplegia

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02586649
Recruitment Status : Enrolling by invitation
First Posted : October 26, 2015
Last Update Posted : March 5, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. Gregory Schilero, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Brief Summary:

Respiratory complications are the leading cause of death during the initial year after acute SCI, and the third leading cause of death thereafter. Complete or partial loss of respiratory muscle innervations in individuals with cervical and high thoracic injuries leads to inadequate ventilation and inability to effectively clear secretions, often prompting supportive ventilation following initial injury. Development of atelactasis, pneumonias and respiratory failure are the most common respiratory complications observed during the acute phase of injury. It is well known that a restrictive ventilatory defect, dependent upon the level and completeness of injury, is apparent in individuals with chronic cervical SCI. Respiratory functional impairment might be further compromised in these individuals, the majority of whom share many aspects of obstructive airway physiology commonly associated with asthma. The asthma-like features that individuals with chronic cervical SCI demonstrate have been hypothesized to be due to overriding cholinergic airway tone carried by intact vagal (parasympathetic) nerve fibers arising from the brainstem, whereas sympathetic innervations is interrupted at the level of the upper thoracic spinal cord. Whether airway narrowing and AHR in chronic cervical SCI is also related to chronic airway inflammation is unknown, although it is conceivable that repeated respiratory infections or, possibly, a neurogenic component, could contribute to chronic airway inflammation.

Therefore, the investigators aim to assess how long-acting bronchodilator (tiotropium bromide) affects various indices of lung function, including: pulmonary function tests, levels of inflammation and cough strength across 24 hours after receiving study drug. Results will be analyzed for baseline, 1 hour, 3 hours, 20 hours and 24 hours post drug inhalation for both active medication and non-active placebo.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Spinal Cord Injury Drug: Tiotropium Bromide Drug: Placebo Phase 2

Detailed Description:

In addition to a restrictive ventilatory defect stemming for respiratory muscle paralysis, cervical SCI (tetraplegia) is associated with obstructive airway physiology similar to that associated with asthma. The investigators hypothesize that these aspects of obstructive physiology stem from unopposed increases in cholinergic airway tone as a result of autonomic imbalance; where vagal innervation (cholinergic neurotransmission) to the lungs is intact, and the bronchodilating adrenergic influences of sympathetic pathways are interrupted. The investigators demonstrated using spirometric criteria, significant bronchodilator responses in approximately 50% of subjects with tetraplegia following inhalation of short acting beta-2 agonists (albuterol sulfate) and anticholinergic agents (ipratropium bromide). When specific airway conductance (sGaw), a more sensitive indicator of bronchodilation, was assessed via whole body plethysmography, significant bronchodilation and restoration of normal airway caliber was noted in all subjects.

Intuitively, one might expect that through bronchodilation susceptible individuals with tetraplegia who already have compromised respiratory muscle strength and weakened cough might benefit from better airway clearance, and via increases in lung volumes improve the length-tension relationship of residual expiratory muscles for initiation of more forceful coughs. Based upon a comparative study of the bronchodilator effects of ipratropium bromide versus albuterol in persons with tetraplegia (in publication), it appears that ipratropium bromide elicited greater bronchodilation, perhaps because of the specificity of action in blocking acetylcholine binding to the muscarinic-3 (M3) airway smooth muscle receptor. The investigators purpose in this preliminary study is to assess whether salutary effects upon pulmonary function, cough strength, and airway inflammation are observed across a twenty-four hour period following inhalation of a single dose of tiotropium bromide 18 mcg inhalational capsule versus placebo utilizing a double-blind crossover design in persons with chronic stable tetraplegia.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 10 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial to Determine the Effects and Duration of Action of Tiotropium Bromide on Pulmonary Function in Persons With SCI
Study Start Date : July 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : July 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2018

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Tiotropium Bromide group
The study participants will be randomly assigned to receive Tiotropium bromide,single dose (inhalation capsule - 18 mcg) over the course of 24 hours on day one of visit 1 or during visit 3.On the day of the first scheduled visit ( visit 1 ),study participants will be asked to arrive between 12-1 pm at the pulmonary laboratory at the JJPVAMC (7A-13). Baseline blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements will be obtained prior to drug administration. Tiotropium bromide capsule containing active ingredients will be orally inhaled through a SPIRIVA HandiHaler. Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide, pulmonary function ( spirometry , static lung volumes and specific airway conductance) will be performed at 20 and 24 hours. The same schedule will be followed for visits 3 and 4;vists 3 and 4 will be scheduled between 14 and 21 days after visit 2.
Drug: Tiotropium Bromide
Tiotropium bromide is an anticholinergic used to study bronchodilatation and improvement of pulmonary function in tetraplegic patients
Other Name: Anticholinergic

Drug: Placebo
Placebo is a non-active inhalation capsule .

Placebo Comparator: Placebo
The study participants will be randomly assigned to receive placebo , single dose (inhalation capsule - 18 mcg) over the course of 24 hours on day one of visit 1 or during visit 3.On the day of the first scheduled visit ( visit 1 ),study participants will be asked to arrive between 12-1 pm at the pulmonary laboratory at the JJPVAMC (7A-13). Baseline blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) measurements will be obtained prior to drug administration. Placebo capsule containing active ingredients will be orally inhaled through a SPIRIVA HandiHaler. Measurements of exhaled nitric oxide, pulmonary function ( spirometry , static lung volumes and specific airway conductance) will be performed at 20 and 24 hours. The same schedule will be followed for visits 3 and 4;vists 3 and 4 will be scheduled between 14 and 21 days after visit 2.
Drug: Tiotropium Bromide
Tiotropium bromide is an anticholinergic used to study bronchodilatation and improvement of pulmonary function in tetraplegic patients
Other Name: Anticholinergic

Drug: Placebo
Placebo is a non-active inhalation capsule .




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Spirometry values from baseline [ Time Frame: Baseline,one hours post,three hours post,twenty hours post,twenty four hours post ]
    During Visit 1 (0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 2 (20 and 24 hours post-drug); Visit 3( between 14 and 21 days after visit 2- 0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 4 (following visit 3)

  2. Change in Exhaled Nitric Oxide ( FeNO ) [ Time Frame: Baseline,one hours post,three hours post,twenty hours post,twenty four hours post ]
    During Visit 1 (0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 2 (20 and 24 hours post-drug); Visit 3( between 14 and 21 days after visit 2- 0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 4 (following visit 3)


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Lung volumes ( Plethysmography ) [ Time Frame: Baseline,one hours post,three hours post,twenty hours post,twenty four hours post ]
    During Visit 1 (0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 2 (20 and 24 hours post-drug); Visit 3( between 14 and 21 days after visit 2- 0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 4 (following visit 3)

  2. Change in Airway Resistance by Impulse Oscillometry System (IOS) [ Time Frame: Baseline,one hours post,three hours post,twenty hours post,twenty four hours post ]
    During Visit 1 (0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 2 (20 and 24 hours post-drug); Visit 3( between 14 and 21 days after visit 2- 0,1 and 3 hours post-drug); Visit 4 (following visit 3)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Chronic Spinal Cord Injury (>1 year post-injury)
  2. Stable tetraplegia (level of injury C3-C8, non-ventilator dependent)
  3. Male or female between the ages 18-65

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Smoking, active or history of smoking during last 6 months;
  2. Ventilator dependent;
  3. Known history of asthma, COPD or inflammatory disease during lifetime;
  4. Active or recent (within 3 months) respiratory infection;
  5. Use of medications known to affect the respiratory system;
  6. Use of medications known to alter airway caliber
  7. Uncontrolled hypertension;
  8. Glaucoma or cataracts;
  9. History of milk protein allergy
  10. Pregnant or trying to become pregnant
  11. Lack of mental capacity to give informed consent

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02586649


Locations
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United States, New York
James J Peters VA Medical Center
New York, New York, United States, 10468
Sponsors and Collaborators
James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Gregory Schilero, MD James J. Peters VA Medical Center

Publications of Results:
Other Publications:
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Responsible Party: Dr. Gregory Schilero, Director of Sleep Lab/ICU, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02586649     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SCH-14-019
First Posted: October 26, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 5, 2018
Last Verified: March 2018
Keywords provided by Dr. Gregory Schilero, James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center:
tiotropium bromide
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Bronchodilator Agents
Spinal Cord Injuries
Spinal Cord Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Trauma, Nervous System
Wounds and Injuries
Bromides
Tiotropium Bromide
Cholinergic Antagonists
Autonomic Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Anti-Asthmatic Agents
Respiratory System Agents
Parasympatholytics
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Anticonvulsants