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A Well-being Training for Preservice Teachers (PST)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02544412
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : September 9, 2015
Last Update Posted : December 4, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Mind and Life Institute, Hadley, Massachusetts
The Trust for the Meditation Process
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this project is to study whether a mindfulness-based training program supports self-regulation, resiliency, effective classroom behaviors, and persistence in teaching.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Burnout, Professional Stress, Psychological Well-being Psychological Adjustment Self-regulation Behavioral: novel mindfulness-based well-being training Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Participants in this study will be undergraduate pre-service teachers already enrolled in the Early Elementary Certification Program (EECP) in the School of Education. This competitive admission program is four semesters long and consists of 4 certificate granting areas. Over the course of 2 years (i.e., 4 semesters), the investigators will recruit a total of 8 cohorts; 2 from each certificate granting area. Participants will be recruited during their second semester in the program for enrollment during the third semester (i.e., enrollment first semester of senior year). Cohorts will be match randomized by cohort type, ensuring that 4 cohorts are randomized to treatment and 4 cohorts are randomized to teacher education as usual, and that one of each type of cohort is randomized to treatment and control, respectively.

All participants will complete a battery of self-report and behavioral tasks, as well as undergo a standardized classroom observation prior to the start of the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and at follow-up (5-8 months post intervention). Follow-up testing will occur during the final month of the final semester in the EECP program, a time during which participants will be full-time student teaching, training that best approximates in-service teaching. The qualitative component of this study will involve participants partaking in approximately four-hours of interviews (either group or individual based on a hierarchal sampling criterion), before and after the intervention period. In addition, all student EECP records will be qualitatively analyzed (i.e., supervisor notes, state certification portfolios). Each September for three years post-graduation, participants will be contacted and instructed to complete an online survey consisting of self-report inventories and information about whether they are continuing to teach and if so, the name and district of the school they currently work.

Participants randomized to treatment will receive 1.5 hours of mindfulness training for 8 to 10 weeks during their third semester. Thirty minutes of this will occur during mandatory cohort seminar time, with the remaining one-hour after the end of cohort seminar time. In addition, during the intervention period they will participate in two 4-hour "Days of Mindfulness." In total, intervention participants will receive about 21 hours of instruction in mindfulness over the intervention period. During the following semester (4th semester), intervention participants will receive 15 minutes of mindfulness "booster" practice each week as part of their mandatory cohort seminar.

This novel mindfulness based intervention is incorporates elements of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (Kabat-Zinn, 1982), as well as contemplative practices that might be defined as social connectedness practices or constructivist practices (Dahl, Lutz, & Davidson, 2015). The curriculum has been developed by experienced mindfulness teachers (>10 years teaching experience, on average), all of whom have extensive meditation histories and most of whom have long-term experience as classroom teachers. The training will consist of formal and informal mindfulness meditation practices.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: A Well-being Training for Preservice Teachers
Study Start Date : September 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2017
Estimated Study Completion Date : September 2020

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Intervention Group
A novel mindfulness-based well-being training for preservice teachers will be employed. The intervention will be held once a week for 8-10 weeks. Two 4-hour "days of mindfulness" will also be implemented during the intervention period. The intervention will involve training in a range of attentional and constructive (Dahl, Lutz, & Davidson) contemplative practices. During the follow-up period participants will receive weekly 15 minute "booster" trainings.
Behavioral: novel mindfulness-based well-being training
No Intervention: Control Group
Teacher education as usual. These participants will continue with the prescribed teacher training regime established by the Early Education Certification Program at the university.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline on CLASS assessment tool (La Paro, Pianta, & Stuhlman, 2004) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A standardized classroom observation tool assessing teacher classroom behaviors.

  2. Change from baseline on Symptoms Checklist 90 Revised (Derogatis, 1994) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    a 90-item self-report of psychological symptoms comprised of 9 symptom axes (somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation and psychoticism). An aggregated score across all 9 domains provides a Global Severity Index score of psychological health.

  3. Change from baseline on Maslach Burnout Inventory - Education Survey (Maslach, Jackson, & Leiter, 1996) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11-12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8-11 months after baseline (5-8 months post-intervention): ~14 months after baseline, ~26 months after baseline, and ~38 months after baseline ]
    a 22-item self-report of teaching related burnout

  4. Change from baseline on Emotional go/nogo (Hare et al., 2008) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    An emotional inhibition paradigm.

  5. Persistence in teaching: Current profession and role (if teaching, name of school) [ Time Frame: ~ 14 months after baseline, ~ 26 months after baseline, and ~ 38 months after baseline. ]
    Self-report on employment status following graduation and teacher licensure.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change from baseline on Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (Quirin, Kazen, & Kuhl, 2009) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11-12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8-11 months after baseline (5-8 months post-intervention): ~14 months after baseline, ~26 months after baseline, and ~38 months after baseline ]
    A computer-based behavioral measure of implicit affective bias in which participants are provided with 5 nonsense words and asked to rate the words on a scale of emotional valence.

  2. Change from baseline on General Self-efficacy Scale (Jerusalem & Schwarzer, 1992) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A 10-item self-report of general self-efficacy

  3. Change from baseline on Psychological Well-Being Scale (Ryff & Keyes, 1995) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11-12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8-11 months after baseline (5-8 months post-intervention): ~14 months after baseline, ~26 months after baseline, and ~38 months after baseline ]
    A 54-item self-report inventory assessing psychological well-being.

  4. Change from baseline on Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen, 1988) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A self-report survey of general positive and negative affect.

  5. Change from baseline on Emotional Styles Questionnaire (under development) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11-12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8-11 months after baseline (5-8 months post-intervention): ~14 months after baseline, ~26 months after baseline, and ~38 months after baseline ]
    A self-report designed to assess styles of emotional responding.

  6. Change from baseline on Open response on difficulties in teaching [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A one-item open response on difficulty in teaching.

  7. Change from baseline on Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A 10-item self-report on perceived stress in the last month.

  8. Change from baseline on Implicit Association Task (Race, child and adult versions; Baron & Banaji, 2006) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A behavioral task designed to assess implicit biases related to race.

  9. Change from baseline on Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (Baer et al., 2008) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    A 39-item self-report of mindfulness

  10. Change from baseline on Breath Count Task (Levinson et al., 2014) [ Time Frame: 1-2 weeks before intervention (i.e., baseline), 11 - 12 weeks after baseline (1-2 weeks post-intervention), 8 - 11 months after baseline ( 5-8 months post intervention) ]
    15 minute behavioral measure of mindfulness



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Undergraduate students in good academic standing entering their third semester of one of the following teacher education certificate programs (Early Education ESL, Middle Education SPED, Middle Education Content, Middle Education ESL). Note that good academic standing is a requirement for continuation in the certification program.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • A history of schizophrenia-spectrum, bipolar disorder, or other psychotic disorders

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02544412


Locations
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United States, Wisconsin
UW Madison Department of Curriculum and Instruction
Madison, Wisconsin, United States, 53706
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Mind and Life Institute, Hadley, Massachusetts
The Trust for the Meditation Process
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Lisa Flook, PhD University of Wisconsin, Madison
Study Director: Matthew J Hirshberg, MS, MEd University of Wisconsin, Madison
Publications:
La Paro, K. M., Pianta, R. C., & Stuhlman, M. (2004). The Classroom Assessment Scoring System: Findings from the prekindergarten year. The Elementary School Journal, 104(5), 409-426. http://doi.org/10.1086/499760
Derogatis, L. R. (1994). SCL-90-R Symptom Checklist-90-R administration, scoring and procedures manual. Minneapolis, MN: National Computer Systems.
Maslach, C., Jackson, S. E., & Leiter, M. P. (1996). Maslach burnout inventory manual . Mountain View, CA: CPP. Inc., and Davies-Black.
Jerusalem, M., & Schwarzer, R. (1992). Self-efficacy as a resource factor in stress appraisal processes. Self-efficacy: Thought control of action, 195-213.

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Responsible Party: University of Wisconsin, Madison
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02544412    
Other Study ID Numbers: 2014-1263
A487400 ( Other Identifier: UW, Madison )
L&S/PSYCHOLOGY/PSYCHOLOGY ( Other Identifier: UW, Madison )
First Posted: September 9, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 4, 2019
Last Verified: December 2019
Keywords provided by University of Wisconsin, Madison:
Mindfulness
School Teachers
preservice teachers
teacher education
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Burnout, Professional
Stress, Psychological
Burnout, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms
Occupational Stress
Occupational Diseases