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Kansas University DHA Outcome Study (KUDOS) Follow-Up

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02487771
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 1, 2015
Results First Posted : September 25, 2017
Last Update Posted : February 7, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Susan Carlson, PhD, University of Kansas Medical Center

Brief Summary:
This is a continuation study to KUDOS (NCT00266825). The purpose of this study is to follow-up with participants on the original study to determine if the effects of increasing DHA intake during pregnancy increase cognitive development in 2 to 6 year-old children.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Pregnancy Drug: DHA Drug: Placebo Capsule Phase 3

Detailed Description:
Numerous trials show benefits of postnatal DHA supplementation for visual acuity. There are also numerous observational(not intervention)studies that link higher maternal DHA status during pregnancy to higher cognitive function. Intervention studies that increase DHA exposure during fetal life and that measure cognitive development of infants are lacking; and no study to date has systematically followed children whose mothers were randomly assigned to DHA supplementation to school age with regular 6 month assessments of age-appropriate assessments of cognitive development. The absence of such studies is a serious limitation because there is evidence that differences in cognitive function due to such interventions do not become robust until around age 4 years. Women in the US consume low amounts of DHA compared to other world populations, and this likely means less DHA transfer to the fetus than in many other populations. Prenatal DHA exposure may be more important than postnatal exposure, because animal studies show critical windows for brain DHA accumulation in relation to effects on neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine and GABA.

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 190 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Kansas University DHA Outcome Study (KUDOS) Follow-Up
Study Start Date : July 2008
Actual Primary Completion Date : May 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2016

Arm Intervention/treatment
Placebo Comparator: Placebo Capsule Drug: Placebo Capsule
600 mg of Soybean Oil and Corn Oil, which does not contain any DHA

Experimental: DHA Capsule Drug: DHA
600 mg DHA capsule
Other Name: docosahexaenoic acid




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Full Scale IQ [ Time Frame: 36 Months ]
    The Full Scale IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's general intellectual ability based upon assessments of verbal, cognitive, and performance domains. At three years the Full Scale IQ score has a range of 41 (poorest performance) to 155 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 40 to 160. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  2. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Full Scale IQ [ Time Frame: 48 Months ]
    The Full Scale IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's general intellectual ability based upon assessments of verbal, cognitive, and performance domains. At three years the Full Scale IQ score has a range of 41 (poorest performance) to 155 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 40 to 160. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  3. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Full Scale IQ [ Time Frame: 72 Months ]
    The Full Scale IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's general intellectual ability based upon assessments of verbal, cognitive, and performance domains. At three years the Full Scale IQ score has a range of 41 (poorest performance) to 155 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 40 to 160. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  4. Cognitive Function Score - Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test [ Time Frame: 60 Months ]
    The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, 3rd Edition provides a standardized assessment of a person's receptive vocabulary. The Standard Score can range from 40 (poorest performance) to 160 (best performance) and has been normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  5. Cognitive Function Score - Test of Preschool Early Literacy [ Time Frame: 42 Months ]
    The Test of Preschool Early Literacy provides a standardized Early Literacy Index score, a measure of general, early literacy skills that relate to later reading and writing skill acquisition. The score is based on assessments of vocabulary, print knowledge, and phonological awareness. The score can range from 40 (poorest performance) to 144 (best performance) and has been normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  6. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Verbal IQ [ Time Frame: 36 Months ]
    The Verbal IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's verbal ability based upon assessments of vocabulary, general knowledge, and reasoning. At three years the Verbal IQ score has a range of 49 (poorest performance) to 150 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 46 to 155. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  7. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Verbal IQ [ Time Frame: 48 Months ]
    The Verbal IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's verbal ability based upon assessments of vocabulary, general knowledge, and reasoning. At three years the Verbal IQ score has a range of 49 (poorest performance) to 150 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 46 to 155. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.

  8. Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition; Verbal IQ [ Time Frame: 72 Months ]
    The Verbal IQ score from the Weschler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, 3rd Edition is a standardized measure of a child's verbal ability based upon assessments of vocabulary, general knowledge, and reasoning. At three years the Verbal IQ score has a range of 49 (poorest performance) to 150 (best performance). For the older ages the score can range from 46 to 155. For all ages the assessment is normed to a Mean = 100, St Dev = 15.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Adaptive Regulation Assessment [ Time Frame: 36 Months ]
    The Parent Rating Scales of the Behavior Assessment System for Children 2nd Edition measures different aspects of a child's behaviors as reported by a parent. Externalizing Problems is a measure of Aggression and Hyperactivity. Internalizing Problems is a measure of Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization. The Behavioral Symptoms Index is a more global measure of behavior problems and combines Externalizing Problems with the measure of Depression from Internalizing Problems, and additional measures of Atypicality, Withdrawal, and Attention Problems. Adaptive Skills is a measure of Adaptability, Social Skills, Activities of Daily Living, Functional Communication, and at age 6 years Leadership. All scores are derived from the general, combined sex normative tables of T-Scores. For Adaptive Skills higher T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. For all other measures lower T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. All T-Scores were standardized with a Mean = 50, St Dev = 10.

  2. Adaptive Regulation Assessment [ Time Frame: 48 Months ]
    The Parent Rating Scales of the Behavior Assessment System for Children 2nd Edition measures different aspects of a child's behaviors as reported by a parent. Externalizing Problems is a measure of Aggression and Hyperactivity. Internalizing Problems is a measure of Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization. The Behavioral Symptoms Index is a more global measure of behavior problems and combines Externalizing Problems with the measure of Depression from Internalizing Problems, and additional measures of Atypicality, Withdrawal, and Attention Problems. Adaptive Skills is a measure of Adaptability, Social Skills, Activities of Daily Living, Functional Communication, and at age 6 years Leadership. All scores are derived from the general, combined sex normative tables of T-Scores. For Adaptive Skills higher T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. For all other measures lower T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. All T-Scores were standardized with a Mean = 50, St Dev = 10.

  3. Adaptive Regulation Assessment [ Time Frame: 60 Months ]
    The Parent Rating Scales of the Behavior Assessment System for Children 2nd Edition measures different aspects of a child's behaviors as reported by a parent. Externalizing Problems is a measure of Aggression and Hyperactivity. Internalizing Problems is a measure of Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization. The Behavioral Symptoms Index is a more global measure of behavior problems and combines Externalizing Problems with the measure of Depression from Internalizing Problems, and additional measures of Atypicality, Withdrawal, and Attention Problems. Adaptive Skills is a measure of Adaptability, Social Skills, Activities of Daily Living, Functional Communication, and at age 6 years Leadership. All scores are derived from the general, combined sex normative tables of T-Scores. For Adaptive Skills higher T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. For all other measures lower T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. All T-Scores were standardized with a Mean = 50, St Dev = 10.

  4. Adaptive Regulation Assessment [ Time Frame: 72 Months ]
    The Parent Rating Scales of the Behavior Assessment System for Children 2nd Edition measures different aspects of a child's behaviors as reported by a parent. Externalizing Problems is a measure of Aggression and Hyperactivity. Internalizing Problems is a measure of Anxiety, Depression, and Somatization. The Behavioral Symptoms Index is a more global measure of behavior problems and combines Externalizing Problems with the measure of Depression from Internalizing Problems, and additional measures of Atypicality, Withdrawal, and Attention Problems. Adaptive Skills is a measure of Adaptability, Social Skills, Activities of Daily Living, Functional Communication, and at age 6 years Leadership. All scores are derived from the general, combined sex normative tables of T-Scores. For Adaptive Skills higher T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. For all other measures lower T-Scores reflect a more optimal outcome. All T-Scores were standardized with a Mean = 50, St Dev = 10.


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 2 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  2. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 2.5 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  3. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  4. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 2 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  5. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 3.5 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  6. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  7. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  8. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  9. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  10. Anthropometrics: Weight-for-age [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child weight was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 kg on an electronic scale (Cardinal Detecto 8430, Webb City, MS, USA).

  11. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 2.5 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  12. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  13. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 3.5 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  14. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  15. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  16. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  17. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  18. Anthropometrics: Height-for-Age [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child stature was measured one time standing without shoes and in the lightest layer of clothing to the nearest 0.1 cm using a wall mounted statiometer (Health O Meter® Professional, McCook IL, USA). Braids, ponytails or other hair artifacts were removed or subtracted when needed.

  19. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 2 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  20. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 2.5 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  21. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  22. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 3.5 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  23. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  24. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  25. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  26. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  27. Anthropometrics: Body Mass Index-for-age [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child body mass index (BMI) was calculated using the standard equation: BMI = kg/m^2.

  28. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 2 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  29. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 2.5 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  30. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  31. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 3.5 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  32. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  33. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  34. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  35. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  36. Anthropometrics: Head Circumference-for-age [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child head circumference was measured to the nearest 0.1 cm using standard technique (tape positioned just above the eyebrows, above the ears and around the biggest part of the back of the head; tape pulled snuggly to compress hair and underlying soft tissue). Braids, ponytails, glasses or other artifacts were removed whenever possible.

  37. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 2 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  38. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 2.5 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  39. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  40. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 3.5 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  41. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  42. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  43. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  44. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  45. Dietary Intake [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually a registered dietitian assessed child diet by a standardized 24 hour dietary recall with three-pass approach. When necessary both the parent and child participated in the recall process to increase overall reliability. Recalls were entered into Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R versions 2006-2016, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA) and were checked for accuracy by a second dietitian. Reliability and caloric intake data are presented here. Reliability is defined as the dietitian's subjective assessment of the family's ability to recall the majority of food items consumed during the 24 hour period and within reasonable serving sizes. Caloric intake is the mean kcal per day from reliable recalls only.

  46. Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  47. Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  48. Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  49. Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  50. Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  51. Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  52. Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  53. Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  54. Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  55. Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child blood pressure was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  56. Heart Rate [ Time Frame: 4 years ]
    Biannually child heart rate was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  57. Heart Rate [ Time Frame: 4.5 years ]
    Biannually child heart rate was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  58. Heart Rate [ Time Frame: 5 years ]
    Biannually child heart rate was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  59. Heart Rate [ Time Frame: 5.5 years ]
    Biannually child heart rate was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.

  60. Heart Rate [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Biannually child heart rate was measured in triplicate using an automatic pressure cuff (GE Carescape V100, Chicago, IL, USA) while children were seated in a resting state. Raw averages are reported here, including outliers. Not all subjects participated in triplicate measures.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years to 35 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnant females 16.0-35.0 years of age (inclusive) at 8-20 weeks gestation at enrollment (date/ultrasound)
  • Agree to consume study capsules from enrollment until delivery
  • Agree to return to the study center for delivery
  • BMI < 40
  • No serious illnesses (e.g., cancer, diabetes, lupus, hepatitis, sexually transmitted diseases, not HIV positive)
  • Available by telephone

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Less than 16 or greater than 35 years of age
  • BMI < 40
  • Serious illness such as cancer, lupus, hepatitis, sexually transmitted disease or HIV positive
  • Expecting multiple infants
  • Diabetes or gestational diabetes at baseline
  • Elevated blood pressure due to any cause
  • Not planning to return to the study center for delivery
  • Gestational age at baseline < 8 weeks or >20 weeks
  • Unable or unwilling to agree to consume capsules until delivery
  • Unable to provide informed consent in English

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02487771


Locations
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United States, Kansas
University of Kansas Medical Center
Kansas City, Kansas, United States, 66160
Sponsors and Collaborators
Susan Carlson, PhD
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Susan E Carlson, PhD University of Kansas Medical Center
Additional Information:
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Susan Carlson, PhD, Professor, University of Kansas Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02487771    
Other Study ID Numbers: 11406
1R01HD047315 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: July 1, 2015    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: September 25, 2017
Last Update Posted: February 7, 2018
Last Verified: January 2018

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Susan Carlson, PhD, University of Kansas Medical Center:
DHA
childhood development