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Neurocircuit Mechanisms of OCD Across the Lifespan

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02437773
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : May 8, 2015
Last Update Posted : February 1, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Kate D. Fitzgerald, University of Michigan

Brief Summary:

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), characterized by intrusive thoughts (obsessions) and related behavioral rituals (compulsions), is a common psychiatric illness that often emerges in childhood and causes life-long disability in over 50% of patients. Psychological theory suggests that OCD symptoms are driven by a person's difficulty disengaging their feelings from simple tasks (e.g. washing hands, locking a door) due to excessive anxiety about performance errors. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the gold standard treatment for OCD, repeatedly exposes patients to their OCD-stressor until this anxiety is reduced. While CBT is typically more effective in teenagers than adults, patients from both age groups are usually left with residual symptoms, highlighting the need for better treatments. In this study, CBT will be studied in both teen-aged and adult patients. Two groups, both with childhood onset OCD, will be randomized to either CBT for OCD or stress management training (SMT), an active therapy but with minimal effects on OCD symptoms. The investigators will also study age-matched, healthy controls as comparison subjects.

Before and after 12 weeks of CBT, all subjects will undergo functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans to see what regions of the brain become active when a concentration task is performed and how that activation is changed after CBT. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the brain changes associated with CBT treatment and how differences in these changes in teenage compared to adult patients may drive differences in CBT response.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adolescents Behavioral: Stress Management Therapy - Adolescents Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adolescents Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adults Behavioral: Stress Management Therapy - Adults Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adults Other: fMRI only - Healthy Control Adults Other: fMRI only - Healthy Control Adolescents Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
While the study itself is of parallel design for its data-collection and measurement purpose, it is listed as a partial-crossover design in the IRB-approved protocol because subjects randomized to the SMT group are given the option of entering 12-weeks of CBT sessions after all of their SMT data collection. To understand brain changes that occur with CBT compared to SMT in both age groups, the investigators will collect fMRI data before and after therapy. Some limited data will be collected in patients who are initially randomized to SMT but then opt to crossover to CBT. fMRI data will also be collected in healthy teens and adults before and after 12 weeks (but without intervening therapy) to allow the investigators to control for the simple effects of time that may cause brain changes that are not related to therapy.

Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 220 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Neurocircuit Mechanisms of OCD Across the Lifespan
Study Start Date : September 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : July 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : July 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adolescents
12 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy sessions scheduled weekly over a 12-week period.
Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adolescents
A therapy which gradually yet repeatedly exposes adolescent patients to their obsessive compulsive-relevant "error" cues during a task performance until their anxiety habituates.
Other Name: CBT

Stress Management Therapy - Adolescents

12 SMT sessions scheduled weekly over a 12-week period.

After study completion, the OCD subjects who received SMT may derive benefit for non-OCD anxiety symptoms. They will be offered a 12-week course of CBT with a study therapist to directly target OCD symptoms (i.e., a partial cross-over).

Behavioral: Stress Management Therapy - Adolescents
An active control therapy with minimal effects on OCD symptoms.
Other Name: SMT

Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adolescents
This is the cross-over element for those that completed the SMT treatment group and opt to have the OCD treatment.
Other Name: CBT

Active Comparator: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adults
12 CBT sessions scheduled weekly over a 12-week period.
Behavioral: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Adults
A therapy which gradually yet repeatedly exposes adult patients to their obsessive compulsive-relevant "error" cues during a task performance until their anxiety habituates.
Other Name: CBT

Stress Management Therapy - Adults

12 SMT sessions scheduled weekly over a 12-week period.

After study completion, the OCD subjects who received SMT may derive benefit for non-OCD anxiety symptoms. They will be offered a 12-week course of CBT with a study therapist to directly target OCD symptoms (i.e., a partial cross-over).

Behavioral: Stress Management Therapy - Adults
An active control therapy with minimal effects on OCD symptoms.
Other Name: SMT

Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adults
This is the cross-over element for those that completed the SMT treatment group and opt to have the OCD treatment.
Other Name: CBT

Healthy Control - Adolescents
Healthy control adolescents matched to gender, race and socioeconomic status (SES) with adolescent patients with OCD will be enrolled. These healthy adolescents will be scanned with fMRI before and after 12 weeks, but without any intervention (i.e., no therapy).
Other: fMRI only - Healthy Control Adolescents
Two fMRI's only, scheduled at 12-weeks apart. This is for Healthy Control Adolescents and is used only as a means for observation, NOT as an intervention to be studied.

Healthy Control - Adults
Healthy control adults matched to gender, race and socioeconomic status (SES) with adult patients with OCD will be enrolled. These healthy adults will be scanned with fMRI before and after 12 weeks, but without any intervention (i.e., no therapy).
Other: fMRI only - Healthy Control Adults
Two fMRI's only, scheduled at 12-weeks apart. This is for Healthy Control Adults and is used only as a means for observation, NOT as an intervention to be studied.

Optional CBT - Adolescents
OCD adolescent participants who were randomized to the SMT and have completed all study procedures will be offered an additional 12 weeks of Optional Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.
Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adolescents
This is the cross-over element for those that completed the SMT treatment group and opt to have the OCD treatment.
Other Name: CBT

Optional CBT - Adults
OCD adult participants who were randomized to the SMT and have completed all study procedures will be offered an additional 12 weeks of Optional Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.
Behavioral: Optional CBT - Adults
This is the cross-over element for those that completed the SMT treatment group and opt to have the OCD treatment.
Other Name: CBT




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Brain activity as assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-weeks ]
    fMRI BOLD signal response of posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and anterior insula (aIns) during performance monitoring. This signal will be measured as BOLD contrast estimates for errors compared to correct trials based on average signal in a priori defined regions of interest for pMFC, vmPFC and aIns. The investigators are looking for increases in pMFC activation in adolescents from pre- to post-treatment. In contrast, the investigators are looking for increases in inverse connectivity (resting state and during task) between vmPFC and aIns in adults from pre- to post-treatment.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. OCD symptom severity measured by the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for adults or the Child Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for adolescents. [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-weeks ]
    OCD symptom severity measured by the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for adults and the Child Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for adolescents. This scale is administered by an independent assessor to rate OCD symptom severity on a scale of 0 to 40, with 40 being most severe. The investigators are looking for decreases in OCD severity ratings from pre- to post-treatment.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   13 Years to 45 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for all OCD Subjects & Healthy Volunteers:

  • Male or female
  • Age 13-17 (inclusive) subjects diagnosed with OCD, age of onset before 15 years
  • Age 25-45 (inclusive) subjects diagnosed with OCD, age of onset before 15 years
  • Age 13-17 (inclusive) year old healthy volunteers
  • Age 25-45 (inclusive) year old healthy volunteers
  • OCD adolescent and adult subjects can be on medications but will have to be on a stable medication regimen for at least 4 weeks prior to enrolling.
  • Able and willing to give informed consent
  • Ability to tolerate small, enclosed spaces without anxiety

Exclusion Criteria for OCD Subjects:

  • Anyone between the ages of 18-24 (inclusive range)
  • No lifetime diagnosis of bipolar or psychosis disorders
  • Age of OCD onset after 15 years old
  • No substance/alcohol abuse in the past 6 months
  • No lifetime history of substance/alcohol dependence
  • No evidence of suicidal intentions or behaviors in the past 6 months
  • No history of serious medical or neurological illness
  • No history of closed head injury (e.g. loss of consciousness)
  • Pregnant or trying to become pregnant

Additional Exclusion Criteria for Healthy Volunteers:

  • No history of past or current mental illness
  • Not taking any medication, prescription or non-prescription, with psychotropic effects
  • First-degree family members with OCD or tic disorders

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02437773


Contacts
Contact: Dana Mansfield 734-232-0443 Psych-OCD-Study@med.umich.edu
Contact: Laura Stchur, MSW 734-936-1323 Psych-OCD-Study@med.umich.edu

Locations
United States, Michigan
University of Michigan Recruiting
Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States, 48109
Contact: Dana Mansfield    734-232-0443    psych-ocd-study@med.umich.edu   
Contact: Laura Stchur, MSW    734-936-1323    psych-ocd-study@med.umich.edu   
Principal Investigator: Kate Fitzgerald, MD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Michigan
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Kate Fitzgerald, MD University of Michigan, Dept of Psychiatry

Responsible Party: Kate D. Fitzgerald, Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, University of Michigan
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02437773     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HUM00091368
First Posted: May 8, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 1, 2018
Last Verified: January 2018

Keywords provided by Kate D. Fitzgerald, University of Michigan:
OCD

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Compulsive Personality Disorder
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Personality Disorders
Mental Disorders
Anxiety Disorders