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The Bilateral Deficit Phenomenon, Functional and Dynamometric Assessment in Postmenopausal Women

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02434185
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 5, 2015
Last Update Posted : October 15, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Juan Diego Ruiz-Cárdenas, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

Brief Summary:
The bilateral deficit phenomenon (BLD) is defined as an inability of the neuromuscular system to generate maximal force when two homonymous limb operate simultaneously (bilateral contraction) with respect to the force developed when both limbs acts separately (unilateral contraction). From an applied perspective, movement patterns of bilateral homonymous limb are often developed during activities of day living, e.g. rising from a chair or opening a jar. The BLD can be considered an intrinsic property of the human neuromuscular system but could be enough important to constitute a performance-limiting factor for postmenopausal women that involves a degenerative loss of muscular strength. Therefore, a specific analysis of this phenomenon and its relation with activities of daily living, such as climbing a step and rising from a chair, is crucial for detecting variables of neuromuscular performance and develop strategies to minimize the loss of strength.

Condition or disease
Postmenopausal Syndrome Muscle Weakness

Detailed Description:
  • 20 postmenopausal women unexperience in strength training or resistance training, without musculoskeletal, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular limiting-diseases were recruited.
  • Maximum strength of lower limbs during leg-press exercise was measured for future analysis.
  • The force-time curves were measured during climbing a step and rising from a chair.
  • A fragility phenotype test was applied to the subjects to determine frailty phenotype classification, including; weight loss of greater than 10 lbs in the past 12 months, maximal handgrip strength, time to walk 15-ft at usual pace, self-reported leisure time physical activity, and self-reported exhaustion.
  • The anthropometric measurements were performed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Observational Model: Other
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: The Bilateral Deficit Phenomenon, Functional and Dynamometric Assessment in Postmenopausal Women
Study Start Date : March 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : April 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : April 2015



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Assess the maximum force of lower limbs during bilateral and unilateral contraction [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  2. Assess the force-time curve during climbing a step [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  3. Assess the force-time curve during climbing rising from a chair [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  4. Assess bone mineral-free lean tissue mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  5. Assess the fragility phenotype of the subjects [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  6. Assess the rate of force developed in time intervals (0-50, 50-100, 100-150ms) of lower limbs during bilateral and unilateral contraction [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]
  7. Assess fat-tissue mass and lean-tissue mass composition [ Time Frame: Screening visit ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   50 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Postmenopausal women not experienced in strength training or resistance, without musculoskeletal, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular limiting-factor.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Postmenopausal women

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unexperienced in strength training or resistance training.
  • Not musculoskeletal diseases.
  • Not neurological diseases.
  • Not cardiovascular limiting-diseases.
  • Not fragility or pre-fragility phenotype.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02434185


Locations
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Spain
Catholic University of Murcia
Murcia, Spain, 30107
Sponsors and Collaborators
Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Juan Diego JD Ruiz-Cárdenas, BSc, MSc Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Juan Diego Ruiz-Cárdenas, BSc, MSc, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02434185     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UCAM-BLD-1
First Posted: May 5, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 15, 2018
Last Verified: October 2018
Keywords provided by Juan Diego Ruiz-Cárdenas, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia:
Musculoskeletal Physiological Phenomena
Postmenopause
Muscle Strength
Absorptiometry, Photon
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Muscle Weakness
Muscular Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Neuromuscular Manifestations
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Pathologic Processes
Signs and Symptoms