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Trial record 8 of 27 for:    "Developmental Dyspraxia"

Functional Movement-power Training for Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomised Controlled Trial

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02393404
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified March 2015 by Shirley S.M. Fong, The University of Hong Kong.
Recruitment status was:  Active, not recruiting
First Posted : March 19, 2015
Last Update Posted : March 19, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Shirley S.M. Fong, The University of Hong Kong

Brief Summary:

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of functional movement-power training (PT-FMT), functional movement training (FMT) alone and no intervention in improving balance strategies and performance among children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD).

Design: A randomised controlled clinical trial. Sample: 87 children with DCD. Interventions: 12 weeks of PT and FMT or FMT alone in the two intervention groups.

Major outcomes: Sensory organisation test - balance strategy and composite scores; Movement Assessment Battery for Children - total impairment score and balance subscore; hand-held dynamometer measurements of lower limb muscle strength and time to peak force.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Developmental Coordination Disorder Other: PT-FMT Other: FMT alone Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

With the growing numbers of children with dyspraxia in Hong Kong, the focus of paediatric rehabilitation services has shifted from severe motor disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy) to relatively minor motor problems such as developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Evidence-based treatment strategies must be developed to suit this changing need. Children diagnosed with DCD are characterised by marked impairment in motor functions. Poor balance ability is a major concern because it may predispose children to falls and affect their motor skill development. At present, rehabilitation regimes for DCD-affected children use functional movement training (FMT) to induce neural plastic changes in the central nervous system (CNS) and thus enhance functional (balance) performance. Less emphasis is placed on treating the neuromuscular impairments that might also affect functional outcomes. Recently, the investigators research team discovered that slowed hamstring muscle force production, a neuromuscular deficit, may be one of the causes of poor balance strategies in children with DCD, but no effective treatment strategy has yet been examined. Power training (PT) has been found to be effective in increasing the speed of muscle force production and balance in adults through various neuromuscular mechanisms. In this study, the investigators intend to treat both the CNS and peripheral neuromuscular deficits in DCD-affected children. Therefore, the investigators will incorporate PT into a conventional FMT regime. The investigators hypothesise that balance strategies and functional performance in children with DCD will be improved most by treating both the CNS and neuromuscular deficits. This hypothesis will be supported by the finding that PT with FMT is superior to FMT alone in improving balance strategies and functional performance in children with DCD.

Objective: To compare the effectiveness of PT-FMT, FMT alone and no intervention in improving balance strategies and performance among children with DCD. Design: A randomised controlled clinical trial. Sample: 87 children with DCD. Interventions: 12 weeks of PT and FMT or FMT alone in the two intervention groups.

Major outcomes: Sensory organisation test - balance strategy and composite scores; Movement Assessment Battery for Children - total impairment score and balance subscore; hand-held dynamometer measurements of lower limb muscle strength and time to peak force.

Anticipated results and clinical significance: DCD-affected children who receive FMT together with PT will have the best balance performance outcomes. If the results are positive, this training programme could be readily transferrable to clinical practice. This could have positive socio-economic implications, such as shorter treatment periods and reduced healthcare costs.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 87 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Enhancing Neuromuscular Performance and Central Nervous System Plasticity Through Functional Movement-power Training to Improve Balance Strategies in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Randomised Controlled Trial
Study Start Date : March 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : March 2017
Estimated Study Completion Date : March 2017

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: PT-FMT
Functional movement-power training group
Other: PT-FMT
Physiotherapeutic functional movement-power training

Experimental: FMT alone
Functional movement training group
Other: FMT alone
Physiotherapeutic power training

No Intervention: Control
No intervention control group



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in sensory organisation test balance strategy [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]
  2. Changes in sensory organisation test composite scores [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Changes in Movement Assessment Battery for Children total impairment score [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]
  2. Changes in Movement Assessment Battery for Children balance subscore [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]
  3. Changes in hand-held dynamometer measurements of lower limb muscle strength [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]
  4. Changes in hand-held dynamometer measurements of lower limb muscle time to peak force [ Time Frame: Baseline (0 month), 3-month post-intervention (3 months), and 3-month follow-up (6 months) ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 10 Years   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. a formal diagnosis of DCD based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR)
  2. a gross motor composite score ≤ 42 on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency
  3. 6-10 years old
  4. attending a mainstream school; and (5) no intellectual impairment.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. diagnosis of an emotional, neurological or other movement disorder
  2. significant congenital, musculoskeletal or cardiopulmonary disorders that might affect motor performance
  3. receiving active treatments including traditional Chinese medicine
  4. disruptive behaviour
  5. unable to follow instructions thoroughly.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02393404


Locations
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Hong Kong
University of Hong Kong
Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Sponsors and Collaborators
The University of Hong Kong
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Shirley SM Fong, PT, PhD The University of Hong Kong

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Shirley S.M. Fong, Dr, The University of Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02393404     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 27100614
First Posted: March 19, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 19, 2015
Last Verified: March 2015

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Disease
Ataxia
Motor Skills Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Dyskinesias
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders