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Hospitalization & Mortality in Patients With Iron Deficiency CKD and HF Treated With i.v. Iron.

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02392910
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 19, 2015
Last Update Posted : March 19, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jorge Eduardo Toblli, Hospital Aleman

Brief Summary:
Iron deficiency, independent of anemia, appears to increase morbidity and mortality as well as impairing health-related quality of life in chronic heart failure (CHF), and these effects are compounded when patients also experience chronic kidney disease (CKD). This study was designed to determine the effects of intravenous iron treatment on morbidity and mortality following an initial 6-month period and a longer period of up to 5 years.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Iron Deficiency Heart Failure Chronic Kidney Disease Drug: Iron Sucrose Drug: Placebo Phase 4

Detailed Description:

Effect of i.v. iron sucrose on iron parameters and anemia

  • During the original 6 month trial, patients in the i.v. iron group received 1000mg iron per the protocol. No patients required iron in the subsequent 6 months.
  • During the subsequent follow-up, patients required a mean of between 165 and 274 mg iron per year (range: 0 to 600 mg per patient per year).
  • Post the initial 1000mg iron, 19 out of 20 patients required at least a second dose of i.v. iron. Most patients required only one or two doses per year.
  • The average time to requiring a second iron administration was 14.5 ± 2.7 months (range: 14 months, 23 months).
  • Correction of iron deficiency (ID) resulted in statistically significant increases in transferrin saturation (TSAT) throughout the study (p < 0.01 untreated group). At all measured points, TSAT values in the treated group were at least on target (> 20% increase).
  • For serum ferritin, significant differences were observed at 6 months and 1 year however this difference was not observed at 5 years post baseline where serum ferritin values were 173ng/mL and 167ng/mL for the control and IV iron groups, respectively.
  • Statistically significant improvements versus the untreated group were observed for both hemoglobin (Hb) and creatinine clearance (CrCl) as well as for left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class at each year.

Effect of i.v. iron sucrose on hospitalizations and mortality

  • There were numerically fewer hospitalization reported at 6 months compared to those among untreated patients (0% and 25%, respectively), although the difference versus untreated patients was not statistically significant (p=ns).
  • At 1 year after commencing the original study, the number of patients requiring a hospitalization (for any reason) was 50% in the control group and 10% in the IV iron group (p<0.01).
  • By 5 years follow-up these rates had increased to 85% in the control arm and 20% in the IV iron treated group (p<0.01).
  • In relation to all-cause mortality, there were no deaths in either group after the first 6 months. The number of deaths due to any cause after year 1 had increased in both groups (20% in the untreated group, 5% in the treated group; p=ns).
  • At 5 years follow-up, 11 (55%) of patients in the control arm were deceased, compared with 4 (20%) in the IV iron treated group (p < 0.05).

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 40 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Hospitalization and Mortality in Iron Deficient, Anemic Patients With Chronic Kidney (CKD) and Heart Failure Receiving Intravenous Iron Therapy: A Five Year Follow-up From a Pilot Study
Study Start Date : March 2006
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2012
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2012

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Heart Failure Iron

Arm Intervention/treatment
Group A
Placebo
Drug: Placebo
At each visit, the patient lay on a stretcher and underwent a vein cannulation in the forearm with a commercial canula no. 16, which was connected to IV tubing that was connected to a bag of isotonic saline solution 0.9% (200 ml). Each infusion was administered throughout 60 min. This scheme was followed for 5 consecutive weeks.
Other Name: Sodium Chloride 0.9%

Group B
Iron Sucrose
Drug: Iron Sucrose
At each visit, the patient lay on a stretcher and underwent a vein cannulation in the forearm with a commercial canula no. 16, which was connected to IV tubing that was connected to a bag contained 200 ml isotonic saline solution 0.9% plus 200 mg of Iron Sucrose. Each infusion was administered throughout 60 min. This scheme was followed for 5 consecutive weeks.
Other Name: Venofer




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. mortality [ Time Frame: 5 years ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Hospitalization [ Time Frame: 5 years ]


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion:

  • LV ejection fraction (EF) ≤ 35%
  • New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class II to IV
  • Anemia with an iron deficit defined by Hb 12.5 g/dl for men and 11.5 g/dl for women, and some of the following: serum ferritin 100 ng/ml and/or with transferrin saturation (TSAT) 20%
  • Creatinine clearance 90 ml/min.

Exclusion:

  • Hemodialysis therapy
  • Anemia not due to iron deficiency
  • NYHA functional class I
  • History of allergy to the iron supplements
  • Acute bacterial infections, parasitism known in the 4 previous weeks
  • Neoplasm
  • Chronic digestive diseases
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Congenital cardiopathies
  • Receiving iron supplements in the 4 previous weeks
  • Receiving rhEPO in the 4 previous weeks
  • History of hospitalization during the 4 weeks before enrollment into the study.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02392910


Locations
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Argentina
Hospital Aleman
Buenos Aires, Caba, Argentina, 1118
Sponsors and Collaborators
Hospital Aleman
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jorge E Toblli, MD; PhD Hospital Aleman
Publications:
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Responsible Party: Jorge Eduardo Toblli, Jorge Eduardo Toblli, MD; PhD; FASN. Professor of Medicine. Chief of Nephrology., Hospital Aleman
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02392910    
Other Study ID Numbers: 5427-06/07
First Posted: March 19, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 19, 2015
Last Verified: March 2015
Keywords provided by Jorge Eduardo Toblli, Hospital Aleman:
Iron Sucrose
Mortality
Hospitalization
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Kidney Diseases
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Heart Failure
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
Heart Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Urologic Diseases
Renal Insufficiency
Anemia, Hypochromic
Anemia
Hematologic Diseases
Iron Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Ferric Oxide, Saccharated
Hematinics