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Trial record 3 of 228 for:    metformin and cancer AND Hypoglycemic

Metformin for Rising PSA Remote Trial (M-RePoRT)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02376166
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 3, 2015
Results First Posted : December 22, 2017
Last Update Posted : December 22, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Matthew Galsky, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Brief Summary:

Clinical trials are critical to informing the care of patients with cancer. However, only 3-5% of patients with cancer enroll in clinical trials. Poor accrual to trials has major implications with regards to the pace of progress, the cost of clinical cancer research, and the generalizability of results. The investigators have recently shown in an analysis of 7,776 cancer clinical trials registered on clinicaltrials.gov that approximately 20% of cancer clinical trials fail to complete enrollment at all; the most often cited reason was poor accrual.

Prior research has identified barriers to cancer clinical trial accrual that can be generally categorized in the domains of availability, awareness, and acceptance. Much attention has been paid to the barriers involvement awareness and acceptance - however, trial availability is likely a "rate limiting step". This pilot study is the first in a series of planned steps to attempt to shift the current paradigm of "bringing patients to trials" to "bringing trials to patients." With the integration of telemedicine visits, the investigators aim to decrease the burden of participation for patients, begin to address geographic barriers, and ultimately improve trial accrual. In this study, men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer (a rising PSA after definitive local therapy) will receive the antidiabetic drug, metformin. Patients will require a single on-site visit for study enrollment. The remainder of the 6 month study will be conducted via a HIPPA secure telemonitoring system (monthly visits conducted via telemedicine with tablet computers provided to each patients).


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Prostate Cancer Drug: Metformin Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Men with an isolated PSA recurrence after local therapy are an ideal population for the evaluation of novel therapies given the minimal disease burden, generally indolent natural history, and patients' preference to avoid the adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy. Metformin has shown anti-prostate cancer activity in preclinical models and cohort studies. Metformin, a biguanide oral antihyperglycemic agent, abrogates hyperinsulinemia in individuals with and without diabetes and has shown promising anti-prostate cancer activity in preclinical models, epidemiologic studies, and retrospective cohorts. Several epidemiologic/retrospective studies have shown that metformin has a positive impact on overall survival among men with prostate cancer.

These nonclinical and clinical studies have led to calls for prospective studies of metformin in patients with prostate cancer. This is a pilot telemedicine study of metformin in patients with a rising PSA ("biochemical recurrence") after definitive local therapy for prostate cancer.

The current study is supported by the following rationale:

  • A large proportion of clinical trials close prematurely due to poor accrual.
  • Geographic inaccessibility is a barrier to clinical trial participation.
  • Metformin is a safe and inexpensive medication that has demonstrated anti-prostate cancer activity in nonclinical and epidemiologic studies. Importantly, metformin has been shown to be safe in non-diabetic patients (e.g., patients with polycystic ovary disease) and does not cause hypoglycemia.
  • Use of novel technologies may facilitate clinical trial accrual and minimize the burden of participation for patients. Ultimately, these approaches may also decrease the cost of drug development and increase the pace of progress.

In the absence of prohibitive toxicities or disease progression (defined in 4.4), patients may continue treatment for the 6-month study period. This study will include a baseline visit for study enrollment at Mount Sinai. The remainder of the visits will be telemedicine visits conducted using secure video conferencing.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 15 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: M-RePoRT: Metformin - Rising PSA Remote Trial
Study Start Date : July 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 2016
Actual Study Completion Date : December 2016

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Prostate Cancer

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Metformin
850 mg PO once daily for 4 weeks
Drug: Metformin
850 mg PO twice daily for the remainder of the study period (the dose of metformin will be increased to the 850 mg PO twice daily dose in the absence of grade > 1 toxicities)
Other Name: Glucophage




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of Participants That Completed All Telemedicine Visits [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Feasibility will be defined as completion of all telemedicine visits by > 2/3 of enrolled patients (unless treatment discontinued early for toxicity or disease progression).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percentage of Participants With Stable PSA Levels at 6 Months as Defined by a <20% Change [ Time Frame: baseline and 6 month ]
    Percent of patients with 6-month PSA stable 20% change at 6 months as compared to baseline

  2. Adherence With Metformin as Measured by Electronic Pill Adherence Monitoring [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Adherence with metformin as measured by electronic pill adherence monitoring. Patients were provided with an electronic medication dispenser/medication adherence monitoring device. The device provided audible and visual reminders to proceed with drug dosing and was equipped with a cellular modem that registers a signal to a cloud-based database each time a patient accessed his or her study medication. However, the size and shape of the metformin pills caused the device to malfunction frequently, which led patients to access the pills from the device manually; the data, therefore, could not be used for analysis.

  3. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 1 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I would participate in a clinical trial in the future".

  4. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 2 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I would participate in a telemedicine clinical trial in the future".

  5. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 3 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "The time commitment required for participation in this trial was not overly burdensome".

  6. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 4 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "Participation in this trial did not disrupt my work or other activities".

  7. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 5 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I found it easy to use the telemonitoring tablet computer".

  8. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 6 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "This telemedicine approach eases the travel burden for participation in clinical trials for patients".

  9. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 7 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "This telemedicine approach eases the financial burden of participation in clinical trials for patients".

  10. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 8 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "My local physician was adequately informed about my participation in this trial (if applicable)".

  11. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 9 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I felt I was monitored sufficiently closely while enrolled in this trial".

  12. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 10 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I would recommend participation in a telemedicine clinical trial to other patients".

  13. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 11 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I would participate in a clinical trial where the entire trial was conducted remotely without requiring any visits to the study center".

  14. Patient Satisfaction as Measured by a Patient Satisfaction Survey Question 12 [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient satisfaction with the remote clinical trial experience as measured by a patient satisfaction survey - "I felt that I was able to communicate well with the study team, even though most contact was through the tablet computer video instead of in person".

  15. Urgency to Have a Bowel Movement Episodes [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Ist reported outcome - Number of episodes of urgency to have a bowel movement

  16. Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. Ist reported outcome - Number of episodes of Increased frequency of bowel movements

  17. Episodes of Watery Bowel Movements [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. 2st reported outcome - Number of episodes of watery bowel movements

  18. Episodes of Flatulence [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. 3rd reported outcome - Number of episodes of flatulence

  19. Episodes of Bloating [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. 4th reported outcome - Number of episodes of bloating

  20. Episodes of Nausea [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. 5th reported outcome - Number of episodes of nausea

  21. Episodes of Vomiting [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Quality of LIfe as measured by a modified RAND 36-Item Health Survey. 6th reported outcome - Number of episodes of vomiting



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the prostate. (*in situations where pathology reports documenting prostate cancer are no longer available such as when the initial biopsy or prostatectomy was performed in the remote past, a documented history of prior prostate cancer and prostate cancer treatment in prior medical records will be sufficient)
  • Biochemical disease progression after radical prostatectomy and/or radiation therapy (external-beam radiation therapy and/or brachytherapy), and no radiographic evidence of metastases.

    • Men with history of radical prostatectomy are required to have baseline PSA > 0.5 ng/mL (Prior treatment with neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or salvage radiation therapy is allowed, again, with screening PSA greater than or equal to 0.5 ng/mL required for eligibility).
    • Men treated with primary radiation therapy are required to have baseline PSA ≥ 1.0 ng/mL above their post radiation nadir for men who were treated with primary radiation therapy (external beam and/or brachytherapy). Men who had primary radiation therapy followed by salvage prostatectomy are eligible if screening PSA is greater than or equal to 0.5 ng/mL.
    • Men with previous neoadjuvant adjuvant hormone therapy are eligible if testosterone level at screening is non-castrate (≥ 50 ng/dl). Men previously treated with intermittent hormonal therapy are also eligible if level of testosterone at screening is non-castrate (≥ 50 ng/dl).
  • Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status less than or equal to 2 (Karnofsky greater than or equal to 60%).
  • Subjects must have normal organ as defined below:

    • AST(SGOT)/ALT(SGPT) less than or equal to 1.8 X institutional upper limit of normal
    • Serum bilirubin ≤ ULN (except for subjects with Gilbert's Disease who are eligible despite elevated serum bilirubin level)
    • Creatinine ≤ 1.5 mg/dL and/or creatinine clearance > 60 ml/min
  • English speaking

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Concurrent use of other investigational agents or other prostate cancer therapies (e.g., androgen deprivation therapy)
  • Currently taking metformin, sulfonylureas, thiazolidinedione, insulin, or other antidiabetic drugs for any reason.
  • Known hypersensitivity or intolerance to metformin
  • Condition associated with increased risk of metformin-associated lactic acidosis:

    • New York Heart Association Class III or IV Heart Failure
    • Intake of 3 or more alcoholic beverages per day
    • Known history of lactic acidosis

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02376166


Locations
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United States, New York
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
New York, New York, United States, 10029
Sponsors and Collaborators
Matthew Galsky
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Matthew Galsky, MD Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: Matthew Galsky, Associate Professor, Medicine, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02376166     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: GCO 14-0472
First Posted: March 3, 2015    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: December 22, 2017
Last Update Posted: December 22, 2017
Last Verified: November 2017

Keywords provided by Matthew Galsky, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai:
Prostate Cancer

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Prostatic Neoplasms
Genital Neoplasms, Male
Urogenital Neoplasms
Neoplasms by Site
Neoplasms
Genital Diseases, Male
Prostatic Diseases
Metformin
Hypoglycemic Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs