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Trial record 9 of 26 for:    "Wolman disease"

National Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency Study (LAL-D)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02372513
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 26, 2015
Last Update Posted : November 13, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Alexion Pharmaceuticals
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Zarife Kuloglu, Ankara University

Brief Summary:

Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease (CESD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) caused by mutations in the lysosomal acid lipase gene (LIPA) that markedly reduce lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity, leading to the accumulation of lipids, predominately cholesteryl esters and triglycerides, in various tissues and cell types. In the liver, accumulation of lipids leads to diffuse microvesicular steatosis, which progresses to fibrosis and ultimately, to micronodular cirrhosis. Patients typically present with hepatomegaly, liver dysfunction, hepatic failure and type II hyperlipidemia. Although hepatosteatosis is a typical finding, the liver biopsy diagnosis may be misclassified as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or cryptogenic liver disease. Biopsy and radiological findings are not considered diagnostic, but help to suspicion of CESD. The definitive diagnosis is based on deficient LAL activity and/or LIPA gene mutations.

CESD is pan-ethnic, however, the disease incidence is unknown. The estimated incidence of the disease indicates that CESD should be largely underdiagnosed especially in European patients. Elevation of serum transaminases, and hepatomegaly are early indications of liver impairment. Therefore, CESD should be considered as a differential diagnosis in liver disease of unknown origin.

To data, there is no study which evaluated the frequency of CESD in children with unexplained transaminase elevation and/or organomegaly and/or chronic liver disease. The aim of this prospective, multicenter and cross-sectional study is to investigate frequency of CESD in children with unexplained transaminase elevation and/or and/or chronic liver disease and to identify demographic and clinical features of CESD.


Condition or disease
Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease

Detailed Description:

Patients of 3 months to 18 years of age at the time of enrolment who have unexplained transaminase elevation (serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels > 1.5 times the upper limit of normal) for more than 3 months and/or unexplained hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly and/or obesity- unrelated hepatosteatosis and/or biopsy-proven cryptogenic fibrosis and cirrhosis and/or liver transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis will be included.

Potential participants will be invited for LAL enzyme analysis. Written informed consent will be obtained from the parents or guardians of the participants at the time of enrolment. Prospective and retrospective data will be collected. Complete family and medical history, physical examination and previously existing laboratory findings will be recorded on standard case reports form and up to 0.25 ml of blood will be drawn for LAL enzyme analysis. The blood obtained from participants will be spotted on filter paper, and dried blood spot sample (DBS) will be prepared. Finally, the dried blood spot sample will be sent to reference laboratory (NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, England) for LAL enzyme measurement within 1 week.


Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 810 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
Official Title: The Frequency of Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease in Children With Unexplained Transaminase Elevation and Chronic Liver Disease
Study Start Date : January 2015
Actual Primary Completion Date : January 31, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : March 1, 2017





Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Frequency of Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease in children who have unexplained transaminase elevation for more than 3 months and/or organomegaly and/or hepatosteatosis unrelated to obesity and/or cryptogenic fibrosis and cirrhosis [ Time Frame: First day ]

Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Identify demographic and clinical features of Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease [ Time Frame: First day ]

Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA
whole blood


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Ages Eligible for Study:   3 Months to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Patients of 3 months to 18 years of age at the time of enrolment who have unexplained transaminase elevation (serum ALT levels > 1.5 times the upper limit of normal) for more than 3 months and/or unexplained hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly and/or obesity- unrelated hepatosteatosis and/or biopsy-proven cryptogenic fibrosis and cirrhosis and/or liver transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. A male or female of 3 months to 18 years of age at the time of enrolment
  2. Patients who have unexplained transaminase elevation (serum ALT levels > 1.5 times the upper limit of normal) for more than 3 months
  3. Patients who have unexplained hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly
  4. Patients who have obesity- unrelated hepatosteatosis
  5. Patients who have biopsy-proven cryptogenic fibrosis and cirrhosis
  6. Patients with liver transplantation for cryptogenic cirrhosis

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. A male or female < 3 months or > 18 years old
  2. Patients with obesity -related hepatosteatosis
  3. Patients with drug-induced hepatosteatosis ( such as aspirin, methotrexate, amiodarone, glucocorticoid, tamoxifen, 5-fluorouracil, valproate, nucleoid revers transcriptase inhibitors)
  4. Patients with organomegaly or transaminase elevation due to infectious causes (EBV, Brucella, cytomegalovirus, salmonella, malaria, leishmania etc), hæmato-oncological disease (hemolytic anemia, leukemia,lymphoma, malign or benign liver neoplasms), connective tissue disorders (SLE, RA), cardiac and vascular causes (heart failure, pericarditis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, portal vein thrombosis) and obesity.
  5. Patient with definitive diagnosed chronic liver disease such as chronic viral hepatitis (B, C hepatitis), autoimmune hepatitis, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Wilson disease, metabolic disorders.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02372513


Locations
Turkey
Ankara University School of Medicine
Ankara, Turkey
Sponsors and Collaborators
Ankara University
Alexion Pharmaceuticals
Investigators
Study Director: Zarife Kuloglu, M.D Ankara University School of Medicine

Publications of Results:

Other Publications:

Responsible Party: Zarife Kuloglu, Professor (M.D.), Ankara University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02372513     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: LALD-TR
First Posted: February 26, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 13, 2017
Last Verified: November 2017

Keywords provided by Zarife Kuloglu, Ankara University:
Cholesteryl Ester Storage Disease
Children
Liver disease

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Metabolic Diseases
Wolman Disease
Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease
Lipidoses
Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Lysosomal Storage Diseases
Infant, Newborn, Diseases
Lipid Metabolism Disorders