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Trial record 7 of 291 for:    "Somatoform Disorder"

Somatoform Disorder in British South Asians

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02349256
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified January 2015 by Global Health Primary Care Research and Innovation and Network.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : January 28, 2015
Last Update Posted : January 28, 2015
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of Manchester
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Global Health Primary Care Research and Innovation and Network

Brief Summary:
The study uses in depth interviews to understand their experience of somatoform disorder, possible explanations and their experience of somatoform disorder, possible explanations and their understanding of treatments, especially their ideas about psychosocial treatments.

Condition or disease
Somatic Syndrome Disorder

Detailed Description:

"Somatoform" or "functional" syndromes are those that present with physical symptoms, not explained by well-recognized medical illness. Such symptoms are common in all settings and studies have reported that they accounted for one-fifth of all new presentations in primary care. Literature suggests that they are associated with significant levels of psychological distress, disability, impairments in quality of life and high levels of healthcare utilization. Research also suggests that medically unexplained symptoms cause similar (or higher) levels of disability than medically explained symptoms in primary care settings. There have been a number of studies that have looked at the cognitive and behavioural basis of somatisation, and treatment strategies have been trialed based upon a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT)-led approach for these patients.

In British South Asian patients the difficulties in managing this condition are further compounded as culture can have an important role in shaping the experience, interpretation & clinical presentation of emotional distress. Patel reported that GPs found it very challenging to manage South Asian patients with chronic pain due to the way they present with pain, and a greater likelihood of psychosomatic presentations. Language differences as well as cultural differences contributed to the challenges, especially among first- generation South Asians. Further, they felt that self-management strategies were difficult to address. The author concludes by saying 'cultural influences play an important role in the consultation process where patients' behaviour is often bound in their cultural view of health care. (South Asian) patients' presentation of their condition makes diagnosis difficult but can also lead to miscommunication'.


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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 16 participants
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Somatoform Disorder in British South Asians - What Are the Patients' Views?
Study Start Date : December 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 2015

Group/Cohort
Diagnosed with Somatic Syndrome Disorder
Group of participants that are screened and meet criteria for diagnosis of Somatic Syndrome disorder will be asked if they wish to take part in a 1-1 qualitative interview with the researcher.



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Qualitative Interview [ Time Frame: 1 ]
    Individual qualitative interviews with a group of British South Asians to explore their understanding of somatoform disorder and available therapies. These findings will then be used to inform the development of culturally adapted Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for somatisation in British South Asians.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population
Men and women self ascribed British South Asian Origin .
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Men and women of self-ascribed British South Asian origin.
  • Over the age of 18 years.
  • Able to understand spoken and written English and/or Urdu, Gujarati.
  • Able to provide written informed consent.
  • Registered with the GP practice.
  • criteria for somatoform disorder (determined by PHQ15).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • individuals with diagnosed physical or learning disability
  • any form of psychosis.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02349256


Contacts
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Contact: Issak Bhojani, BSc, PhD, MB 01254 617440 issak.bhojani@nhs.net

Locations
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United Kingdom
Shifa Surgery Recruiting
Blackburn, United Kingdom, BB1 6DY
Contact: Issak Bhojani, BSc, PhD, MB    01254 617440    issak.bhojani@nhs.net   
Contact: Saif Bhojani    01254 617440    saif.bhojani1@nhs.net   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Global Health Primary Care Research and Innovation and Network
University of Manchester
Investigators
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Study Chair: Saif Bhojani Research Manager

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Responsible Party: Global Health Primary Care Research and Innovation and Network
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02349256     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 123389
First Posted: January 28, 2015    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 28, 2015
Last Verified: January 2015

Keywords provided by Global Health Primary Care Research and Innovation and Network:
MUS
British South Asians
Somatic Symptoms
Qualitative interviews

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Disease
Somatoform Disorders
Pathologic Processes
Mental Disorders