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Can Arm and Leg Cycling Exercise Improve Walking After Stroke

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02316405
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified December 2014 by Dr. E. Paul Zehr, University of Victoria.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : December 12, 2014
Last Update Posted : December 12, 2014
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Dr. E. Paul Zehr, University of Victoria

Brief Summary:
It has been found that arm and leg cycling is similar to walking. Thus, the objective of this research is to determine if arm and leg cycling can be used to improve walking ability in a post-stroke population. This outcome would directly impact the health and quality of life for those who have suffered a stroke.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Cerebrovascular Accident Other: Arm and Leg Cycling Exercise for Walking after Stroke Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

It has been found that arm and leg cycling is similar to walking in terms of the muscle activation patterns, joint ranges of motion, and neural pathways activated. Another advantage of arm and leg cycling is that it involves coordination of all four limbs in a rhythmic movement. This may be particularly beneficial given previous findings that arm movement contributes to the activation of leg muscles during walking in humans. This is achieved with interconnected neural pathways that link the arms to the legs. These neural interlimb connections remain intact in stroke victims, such that maximizing the contribution of the arms to the legs may increase coordination for walking.

Thus, the objective of this research is to determine if arm and leg cycling can be used to increase the strength of inter-limb connections and if this helps to improve walking ability in a post-stroke population. 15-20 participants will be recruited to participate in a five week training intervention where measures will be taken before and after the intervention to assess efficacy. Arm and leg cycling could provide a novel method to improve inter-limb coupling and walking ability. These outcomes would directly impact the health and quality of life for those who have suffered a stroke.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 20 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Official Title: Can Arm and Leg Cycling Exercise Improve Walking After Stroke?
Study Start Date : July 2011
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2014
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Test Group
5 weeks of arm and leg cycling, 3 times per week for 30 minute of total exercise per session
Other: Arm and Leg Cycling Exercise for Walking after Stroke



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Walking Ability [ Time Frame: Within five days ]
    Treadmill test of walking coordination, speed, and symmetry. Interlimb coordination assessed with peripheral nerve stimulation during arm and leg cycling and walking. Strength of dorsi-flexion and plantar-flexion and grip strength also assessed.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Clinical Status assessed by a Physiotherapist [ Time Frame: Within 5 days ]
    Clinical assessment of skin sensitivity, spasticity, balance and coordination, and walking endurance.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Cerebrovascular accident

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to stand

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02316405


Contacts
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Contact: E P Zehr, Doctorate (250) 472-5487 rnl@uvic.ca

Locations
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Canada, British Columbia
MacLaurin Building Recruiting
Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
Contact: Taryn Klarner, Masters    (250) 472-5487    rnl@uvic.ca   
Sub-Investigator: Taryn Klarner, Masters         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Victoria
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: E P Zehr, Doctorate University of Victoria
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Responsible Party: Dr. E. Paul Zehr, University of Victoria
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02316405    
Other Study ID Numbers: D015017-2011-2014
123456 ( Other Identifier: Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada )
First Posted: December 12, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 12, 2014
Last Verified: December 2014
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Stroke
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases