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Trial record 2 of 24 for:    13688369 [PUBMED-IDS]

Pushing Limits - Adventure: Pilot Study

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02290678
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified February 2015 by Margaret McKinnon, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : November 14, 2014
Last Update Posted : February 20, 2015
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Margaret McKinnon, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton

Brief Summary:

Team building exercises have been shown to be effective in improving an individual's ability to work within a group and build working relationships with others. Adventure Therapy assimilates team building exercises and teachings into an adventure style excursion into the wilderness or other non-typical environment. This combination of exposure and learning creates a unique experience for participants which preliminary research suggests is effective in reducing feelings of hopelessness, guilt, and shame and may increase empathy, self-concept, self-confidence, and subjects' well-being have also been shown to be improved by adventure therapy.

This study will use a series of questionnaires and interviews to determine whether an adventure based therapy is both effective and reasonable as a treatment for people with mood disorders like depression and anxiety. The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of adventure based therapy as a treatment intervention for outpatients with mood disorders. The investigators will observe any changes in mood, perceived self- efficacy, anxiety, self-stigma, hope, quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction, leisure motivation, and stress as a result of this intervention. As well, the investigators aim to capture participant's opinions of the program.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Anxiety Depression Behavioral: Adventure-based Programming Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

"Adventure programming is the use of experiential and challenging approaches to education, recreation, life skills and counseling. It is the use of new, unique and relevant activities to supplement conventional learning processes. Adventure-based activities are tailored to achieve desired outcomes related to specified learning objectives. The core purpose is to intensify learning and insight by focusing on the process that occurs during challenging activities."

Adventure Based Therapy (AT) is a unique approach to traditional therapy strategies. AT is based on the philosophy of "experiential education", which is defined as "learning by doing, with reflection". The idea of experiential learning is based on the belief that learning is a result of direct experience, and learning is most effective when multiple senses are actively involved. By increasing the intensity of the mental and physical demands of learning, one can be fully engaged in the learning by simultaneously stimulating all sensory systems. Psychological research on information processing indicates that multi-sensory processing increases cognitive activity such as problem solving, processing of an experience, and memory. AT combines physical activity, social empowerment, and problem solving skills into a multi-sensory experience.

Recent literature suggests that AT can benefit patients' recovery. For example, preliminary work suggests that AT is effective in reducing feelings of hopelessness, guilt, and shame, and may increase empathy. Self-concept, self-confidence, and subjects' well-being have also been shown to be improved by AT. The concept of AT stems from the idea of team building exercises, and the notion that through participation patients experience increased group cohesion, therapeutic alliance, and communication and negotiation skills. Here, we will assess these variables in patients with mood disorders participating in AT using an extensive assessment battery. In addition, we will follow patients longitudinally to assess the durability of these effects.

The present research will be a pilot study designed to modify the protocol for the main trial. We will assess engagement in treatment by exploring participants' actual experiences and how they attribute meaning to their involvement in the therapeutic adventure based program. A qualitative research design that uses the Grounded Theory method will be used. Grounded Theory promotes a focus on individuals in real life situations and local social contexts. Qualitative interviews give participants the opportunity to have their voices or stories included in research studies as well as contribute to the development of effective treatment interventions. Feasibility of the trial will be determined by analyzing resource and economic utilization throughout the pilot.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 25 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Examining the Feasibility and Efficacy of Adventure Based Therapy as a Treatment Intevention for Depression and Anxiety.
Study Start Date : February 2015
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2015
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2015

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Anxiety

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Intervention
Participate in a two day Adventure-based Programming retreat and team building exercises.
Behavioral: Adventure-based Programming



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Feasibility, as measured by Number of Participants who complete the Adventure-based Programming retreat and team building exercises and Qualitative engagement feedback [ Time Frame: Up to 2 weeks following intervention ]
    Interviews will be conducted with participants to determine the success in engagement of participants and the execution of the study (including allocation of staff, resources, etc.).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. BDI-II Score [ Time Frame: Up to 1 week following intervention ]
    Difference in the score of the Beck Depression Inventory II immediately after the intervention compared to baseline immediately before intervention.

  2. BDI-II Score [ Time Frame: 1 month following intervention ]
    How well the difference in the score of the Beck Depression Inventory II is retained at 1 month compared to immediately after the intervention.

  3. BDI-II Score [ Time Frame: 3 months following intervention ]
    How well the difference in the score of the Beck Depression Inventory II is retained at 3 months compared to immediately after the intervention.

  4. BAI Score [ Time Frame: Up to 1 week following intervention ]
    Difference in the score of the Beck Anxiety Inventory immediately after the intervention compared to baseline immediately before intervention.

  5. BAI Score [ Time Frame: 1 month following intervention ]
    How well the difference in the score of the Beck Anxiety Inventory is retained at 1 month compared to immediately after the intervention.

  6. BAI Score [ Time Frame: 3 months following intervention ]
    How well the difference in the score of the Beck Anxiety Inventory is retained at 3 month compared to immediately after the intervention.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of a mood disorder and a clinician referral.

Exclusion Criteria:

-


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02290678


Contacts
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Contact: Laura Garrick, CCRA 9055221155 ext 35409 lgarrick@stjoes.ca
Contact: Ryan JL Pyrke, B.Eng. 2896836248 pyrkerj@mcmaster.ca

Locations
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Canada, Ontario
St Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton Recruiting
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, L9C0E3
Contact: Laura Garrick, CCRA    9055221155 ext 35409    lgarrick@stjoes.ca   
Sponsors and Collaborators
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton

Additional Information:
Publications:
Anderson, L., Schleien, S. J., McAvoy, L., Lais, G., & Seligmann, D. (1997). Creating positive change through an integrated outdoor adventure program. Therapeutic Recreation Journal, Fourth Quarter, 214-229.
Bandoroff, S. & Newes, S. "Coming Of Age: Evolving Field of Adventure Therapy" (2004). Association for Experiential Education. Volume 3.
Beck, A. T., & Steer, R. A. (1990). Manual for the Beck Anxiety Inventory. San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.
Gillen, M., & Balkin, R. (2006). Adventure counseling as an adjunct to group counseling in hospital and clinical settings. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 31(2), 153-164. doi: 10.1080/01933920500493746
Ewert, A. W., McCormick, B. P., & Voight, A. E. (2001). Outdoor experiential therapies: Implications for TR practice. Therapeutic Recreation Journal, Second Quarter, 170-122.
Chakravorty, D., Trunnell, E. P., & Ellis, G. D. (1995). Ropes course participation and post-activity processing on transient depressed mood of hospitalized adult psychiatric patients. Therapeutic Recreation Journal, Second Quarter, 104-113.
Charmaz, K. (2003). Grounded Theory: Objectivist and Constructivist Methods. Strategies of Qualitative Inquiry, Denzin & Lincoln (EDS.). Sage.
Corbin, J. & Strauss, A. (2008). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory, Sage.
Kyriakopoulos, A. (2011). How individuals with self-reported anxiety and depression experienced a combination of individual counseling along with an adventurous outdoor experience: A qualitative evaluation. Counseling and Psychotherapy Research, 11(2), 120-128. doi: 10.1080/14733145.2010.485696
Patton, M.Q. (2002). Qualitative Research & Evaluation Methods. (3rd edition). Thousand Oaks, CA. Sage.
Riley, K. (2011). Effects of a collaborative outpatient therapy program on self-concept of adolescents with depression. Therapeutic Recreation Journal, 45(1), 32-46.

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Responsible Party: Margaret McKinnon, Academic Head, Mood Disorders Program, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02290678     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Adventure_PILOT
First Posted: November 14, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 20, 2015
Last Verified: February 2015
Keywords provided by Margaret McKinnon, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton:
Pilot Study
Adventure-based Programming
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Depression
Depressive Disorder
Behavioral Symptoms
Mood Disorders
Mental Disorders