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Low Load, High-repetitive Elastic Band Resistance Training in COPD

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02283580
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 5, 2014
Last Update Posted : March 7, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Saey, Didier, M.D.
Maltais, Francois, M.D.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Andre Nyberg, Laval University

Brief Summary:

Recent work have shown that low load, high-repetitive single limb resistance training, if compared to a control, can increase limb muscle function and functional exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) while avoiding the occurrence of limiting exertional symptoms. However, no comparison to another exercise regimen have been performed. In addition neither the intramuscular nor the mechanism of this exercise regimen have been investigated and represents the aim of the proposed project. We will in a prospective, assessor-blind; block randomized controlled, parallel-group trial compare single-limb to two-limb low load, high-repetitive resistance training in patients with severe and very severe COPD

The research hypothesizes are:

  • that single-limb low-load high-repetitive resistance training will provide larger gain in the 6-min walking distance than two-limb low-load high- repetitive resistance training in patients with severe to very severe (stage III-IV) COPD.
  • that eight weeks of single limb training should also be associated with larger physiological (increased muscle endurance, less muscle fatigue and deoxygenation) and structural (muscle protein synthesis, fiber-type distribution and capillarization) muscle adaptations to training, lower cardio- respiratory demand, as well a greater increase in health-related quality of life in comparison to two-limbs simultaneous training.

We will also compare the groups at baseline to investigate the acute effects and mechanisms of single-limb to two-limb low load, high-repetitive resistance training, a comparison that also will include healthy matched controls.

The research hypothesizes are:

  • that involving a large muscle mass during exercise (e.g., two-limb low load, high-repetition resistance training) compared to involving a small muscle mass during training (e.g., single limb low load, high-repetition resistance training) would lead to larger restraints on the cardiorespiratory system in patients with severe to very severe COPD. Conversely, single limb interventions should produce less dyspnea and more muscle deoxygenation and fatigue than two-limb simultaneous exercise while healthy controls will be able to perform both legs/arms exercise without a central constraint, and no negative consequences on muscle fatigue or exercise stimulus.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive Healthy Other: Single limb Other: Two limb Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Intramuscular and Functional Effects and Mechanism of Partitioning the Exercising Muscle Mass in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)
Study Start Date : November 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : February 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : February 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: COPD Lung Diseases

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Single limb resistance training

Low load, high-repetitive resistance training.

  • single limb at a time (e.g., one arm or one leg)
  • elastic bands
Other: Single limb

Low load, high-repetitive resistance training.

  • single limb at a time (e.g., one arm or one leg)
  • elastic bands
  • 8 weeks
  • 3 times/week,
  • each session 60 minutes
  • seven resistance exercises: Latissimus row, leg curl, elbow flexion, chestpress, plantar flexion, shoulder flexion and knee extension
  • maximal number of repetitions (RM) * 3 sets in each exercise.

Active Comparator: Two limb resistance training

Low load, high-repetitive resistance training.

  • two limbs at a time (e.g., both arms or both legs)
  • elastic bands
Other: Two limb

Low load, high-repetitive resistance training.

  • two limbs at a time (e.g., both arms or both legs)
  • elastic bands
  • 8 weeks
  • 3 times/week,
  • each session 60 minutes
  • seven resistance exercises: Latissimus row, leg curl, elbow flexion, chestpress, plantar flexion, shoulder flexion and knee extension
  • maximal number of repetitions (RM) * 3 sets in each exercise.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Walking capacity (distance [meters]) [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Meters walked on the 6- minute walk test. The walking course will be 30 meters in length and the patients will be instructed in accordance to standardized guidelines to walk as far as possible in 6 minutes. One practice test will be performed to minimize risk of learning effect. The highest walking distance of the two 6-min walks will be chosen as baseline value.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Unsupported upper extremity endurance capacity (time [seconds]) [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Endurance time (seconds) on the Unsupported Upper Limb Exercise test (UULEX) will be used to measure unsupported endurance capacity in the upper extremity. Participants will hold a plastic bar (0.2 kg), at shoulder width and will be asked to raise it from hip to the UULEX eight level chart for one minute at each level with a cadence of 30 movements per minute. If a patient reaches the highest level, the plastic bar will be replaced by a heavier one every minute. There are five different weights of the bar (0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 Kg) and the patient will continue on the highest level until symptom limitation.

  2. Isokinetic limb muscle function (Endurance [total work], strength [peak torque]) [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Isokinetic limb muscle function during one-arm shoulder flexion, one-leg knee extension and two-leg knee extension will be assessed. The subjects are informed to flex their arm or extend their leg(s) 25 consecutive times using maximal effort at each repetition during the concentric phase and to rest during the eccentric phase of the movement. Two different aspects of isokinetic muscle function will be measured. Peak torque from the highest contraction will be used for maximal strength and the total work generated from all contractions will be used for limb muscle endurance. The tests will be performed at an angular velocity of 60°• s-1,

  3. Ventilatory response [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Respiratory response during all elastic band exercises (1: one-arm shoulder flexion, biceps flexion, chest press and latissimus row 2: two-arm shoulder flexion, biceps flexion, chest press and latissimus row 3: one-leg knee extension, plantar flexion and leg curl 4: two-leg knee extension, plantar flexion and leg curl) will be determined using a portable gas analysis system (Oxycon Mobile, Viasys Healthcare, Jaeger, Germany. Minute ventilation (VE) oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide excretion (VCO2,), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and pulsed oxygen saturation (SpO2) will be collected

  4. Cardiac output [ Time Frame: Week 0 and week 8 ]
    Arterial blood pressures and cardiac output will be non-invasively measured by a finger photoplethysmography device (BMEYE, Nexfin HD, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) during all elastic band exercises detailed above.

  5. Muscle deoxygenation [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), week 8 ]
    Changes of deoxyhemoglobin/myoglobin concentrations will be non-invasively measured by near-infrared spectroscopy of vastus lateralis muscle. Obtained during all elastic band exercises detailed above

  6. Dyspnea (Rating [0-10]) [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Magnitude of dyspnea after each exercise and test will be measured by the Borg CR 10 scale

  7. Limb muscle fatigue (Rating [0-10]) [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Magnitude of limb muscle fatigue after each exercise and test will be measured by the Borg CR 10 scale

  8. Isometric muscle strength (maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC], and supramaximal twitch tension (TW) and muscle fatigue [ Time Frame: Baseline (week 0), 8 weeks ]
    Directly before and after all elastic band exercises (1: one-arm shoulder flexion, 2: two-arm shoulder flexion, 3: one-leg knee extension, 4: two-leg knee extension) generated force of both MVIC and TW will be measured by an isometric force gauge while participants will be in a standardized positioning. The occurrence of quadriceps (knee extension) or deltoid (shoulder flexion) fatigue induced by the exercise regimens will be quantified by measuring the fall in both MVIC and TW 15 after the elastic band resistance exercises.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   40 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria (COPD):

  • Age: > 40
  • Cumulative (current or ex) smoking history >10 pack-years
  • COPD with non-reversible airflow obstruction corresponding to GOLD 3 and 4

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Recent exacerbation (< 6 weeks)
  • Neuromuscular and/or orthopedic disorders that compromises participation to an exercise program
  • Recent cancer
  • Unstable cardiac disease and cardiac stimulator
  • Asthma
  • Low body weight or obesity (Body Mass Index < 20 Kg/m2 and or > 30kg/m2)
  • Significant hypoxemia at rest (SaO2 <85%)
  • a daily dose > 10mg of systemic prednisone.

Inclusion criteria (Healthy controls)

  • Age: > 40
  • Normal pulmonary function tests.

Exclusion criteria

  • Neuromuscular and/or orthopedic disorders that compromises participation to an exercise program
  • Physically active (>9) according the Voorips questionnaire.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02283580


Locations
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Canada, Quebec
Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ)
Quebec city, Quebec, Canada, G1S4V3
Canada
Centre de recherche de l'IUCPQ
Quebec, Canada, G1V 4G5
Sponsors and Collaborators
Laval University
Saey, Didier, M.D.
Maltais, Francois, M.D.
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Francois Maltais, MD Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ)
Principal Investigator: Didier Saey, Pht, PhD Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ)
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Andre Nyberg, PhD, Laval University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02283580    
Other Study ID Numbers: LLHR-COPD-2014
First Posted: November 5, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 7, 2018
Last Verified: March 2018
Keywords provided by Andre Nyberg, Laval University:
COPD
Healthy adults
Resistance training
Elastic bands
Limb muscle function
Volunteers
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Lung Diseases
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Obstructive