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Trial record 12 of 89 for:    "Neuromuscular Disease" | "Norepinephrine"

Patient Assisted Intervention for Neuropathy: Comparison of Treatment in Real Life Situations (PAIN-CONTRoLS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02260388
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 9, 2014
Results First Posted : July 6, 2018
Last Update Posted : July 6, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Kansas Medical Center

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this large comparative effectiveness study led by Richard J. Barohn, MD, of the University of Kansas Medical Center, is to learn about the safety and effectiveness of nortriptyline, duloxetine, pregabalin and mexiletine in treating cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy (CSPN).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Cryptogenic Sensory Polyneuropathy Drug: Nortriptyline Drug: Duloxetine Drug: Pregabalin Drug: Mexiletine Phase 4

Detailed Description:

The goal of this research project is to find the best drug for the treatment of pain in patients with CSPN. While the pharmaceutical industry has focused attention on drugs for treating diabetic sensory neuropathy (DSPN), and two drugs are now FDA approved, there have not been any prospective trials in CSPN. And, because there are no studies with CSPN patients, insurance carriers often reject authorizing prescriptions for some drugs for patients with CSPN.

There are four drugs that will be tested in this study: nortriptyline, duloxetine, pregabalin and mexiletine. These drugs are not approved by the FDA for the treatment of CSPN and are considered "investigational" in this study.

There are two periods in this study: Screening/Baseline and Study Drug. During the Screening/Baseline period the researchers will determine eligibility for potential subjects. During the second period, eligible patients who consented to participate will take the study drug. Participants will be randomized to receive one of the four drugs in this study. Participants will know which drug they are taking. Participants will not be allowed to switch groups and receive a different drug during the study.

This study uses an adaptive study design. This means the study can enroll less participants and provide better conclusions. The study design allows the researchers the ability to make changes to the approach of the study or to stop the study early if there are strong results.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 402 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Patient Assisted Intervention for Neuropathy: Comparison of Treatment in Real Life Situations (PAIN-CONTRoLS)
Actual Study Start Date : October 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : September 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Nortriptyline
Nortriptyline - 25 mg daily for 1 week at bedtime, then 50 mg daily at bedtime for 1 week, then 75 mg daily at bedtime for the remainder of the study.
Drug: Nortriptyline
Experimental: Duloxetine
Duloxetine - 20 mg daily for 1 week, then 40 mg daily for 1 week, then 60 mg daily for the remainder of the study.
Drug: Duloxetine
Experimental: Pregabalin
Pregabalin - 100 mg at bedtime for 1 week, then 100 mg 2 times per day for 1 week, then 100 mg 3 times per day for the remainder of the study.
Drug: Pregabalin
Experimental: Mexiletine
Mexiletine - 200 mg at bedtime for 1 week, then 200 mg 2 times per day for 1 week, then 200 mg 3 times per day for the remainder of the study.
Drug: Mexiletine



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Co-Primary Measures: Percent of Patients With at Least a 50% Decrease in Likert Pain Scale From Baseline to Week 12 Follow Up and Percent of Patients That Quit [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    The final outcome of the study is a combination of two endpoints, efficacy and quit or treatment discontinuation rates. The first endpoint was a patient responder-defined measure of efficacy. A patient was deemed efficacious if a 50% or more reduction was observed in the Likert pain-scale from the baseline visit to the 12 week visit (i.e. 6 at baseline to 3 or less at week 12). The second endpoint was the observed percentage of patients who discontinued treatment prior to the last follow up visit for any reason or were lost to follow up. The utility function, which combines efficacy and quit rates, was used to drive the adaptive randomization, stopping criteria, and final analysis conclusions.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. SF12 Health Composite Scores [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]

    SF-12v2® Health Survey Standard The Optum™ SF-12v2® Health Survey is a shorter version of the SF-36v2® Health Survey that uses just 12 questions to measure functional health and well-being from the patient's point of view.

    Survey provides psychometrically-based physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores.

    Scores are calibrated so that 50 is the average score or norm, standard deviation = 10.

    Higher scores indicate better health for both mental and physical component summary scores.


  2. PROMIS Pain Interference Short Form v1.0 8a T Score [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]

    Higher scores for pain interference represents worse outcome (more pain interference) T-score metric: 50 is the mean of a relevant reference population and 10 is the standard deviation (SD) of that population.

    On the T-score metric: A score of 40 is one SD lower than the mean of the reference population; A score of 60 is one SD higher than the mean of the reference population.


  3. PROMIS Fatigue Short Form v1.0 8a [ Time Frame: 12 Weeks ]

    Higher scores for fatigue represents worse outcome (more fatigue). T-score metric: 50 is the mean of a relevant reference population and 10 is the standard deviation (SD) of that population.

    On the T-score metric: A score of 40 is one SD lower than the mean of the reference population; A score of 60 is one SD higher than the mean of the reference population.


  4. PROMIS Sleep Disturbance Short Form v1.0 8a [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]

    Higher scores for sleep disturbance represents worse outcome (more sleep disturbance).

    T-score metric: 50 is the mean of a relevant reference population and 10 is the standard deviation (SD) of that population.

    On the T-score metric: A score of 40 is one SD lower than the mean of the reference population; A score of 60 is one SD higher than the mean of the reference population.

    Higher scores equals more of the concept being measured




Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   30 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy.
  • Likert Pain Score of greater than or equal to 4.
  • Must not currently be on nortriptyline, duloxetine, pregabalin or mexiletine or similar class of medication for at least 7 days from baseline study visit.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any medical condition or current medication that would prevent them from taking either nortriptyline, duloxetine, pregabalin or mexiletine.
  • Unable to give consent.
  • Unable or not willing to comply with the study.
  • Other causes for polyneuropathy.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02260388


  Show 46 Study Locations
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Kansas Medical Center
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Richard Barohn, MD University of Kansas Medical Center
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by University of Kansas Medical Center:

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: University of Kansas Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02260388     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: STUDY00001500
PCORI-1306-02496 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute )
First Posted: October 9, 2014    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: July 6, 2018
Last Update Posted: July 6, 2018
Last Verified: June 2018
Keywords provided by University of Kansas Medical Center:
CSPN
neuropathy
pain
pain management
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Neuromuscular Diseases
Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors
Polyneuropathies
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Mexiletine
Pregabalin
Duloxetine Hydrochloride
Nortriptyline
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Anticonvulsants
Calcium Channel Blockers
Membrane Transport Modulators
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Calcium-Regulating Hormones and Agents
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Tranquilizing Agents
Central Nervous System Depressants
Psychotropic Drugs
Neurotransmitter Uptake Inhibitors
Neurotransmitter Agents
Antidepressive Agents
Dopamine Agents
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic
Adrenergic Uptake Inhibitors
Adrenergic Agents
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents