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Trial record 3 of 7 for:    14613558 [PUBMED-IDS]

PRP vs Corticosteroid in Baker's Cyst

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02249377
Recruitment Status : Terminated (Lack of funding)
First Posted : September 25, 2014
Last Update Posted : April 28, 2017
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
NYU Langone Health

Brief Summary:
This is a Prospective study with Randomized patients into either Ultrasound-guided Platelets-Rich-Plasma injection and Ultrasound guided Corticosteroid Injection, with 3 months and 6 months follow ups after aspiration at our institution. There will be 25 patients in each group, including any patient with symptomatic baker's cyst.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Baker's Cyst Other: Platelets-Rich-Plasma Drug: Corticosteroid Phase 3

Detailed Description:

The treatment of Baker's Cysts are based on its presentation, asymptomatic cysts are currently managed conservatively, symptomatic cysts are treated with joint aspiration and Corticosteroid injection, which have shown according to literature a decrease of the cyst size in approximately two-thirds of patients within 2-7 days but only complete disappearance in approximately 7 %. Ultrasound guided cyst aspiration and Corticosteroid injection are also used with reduction of cyst's size with recurrence in 6 months of 19%. Surgical options to remove the cyst include, Open Resection with a recurrence of 50%, 25% of patients have motion limitation recurrence, 37% have wound healing problems or tense swelling of the calf and 75% of patients have joint pain lasting more than 2 days. Arthroscopic resection, with no recurrence in ultrasound performed 6 and 12 months after procedure, pain lasting more than 3 days in 28% of patients, mild hematoma in 7% of patients and 7% where converted into an open procedure

There is no study using ultrasound guided aspiration with platelet-rich-plasma injection (PRP). The rationale for the use of PRP is the belief that the additional platelets will exponentially increase the concentration and release of multiple growth and differentiation factors at the injury site to augment the natural healing process9. PRP does not have any described negative side effect due to the fact that is being prepared from subject's own blood, with no risk of allergy or cross infection, relatively easy for a practiced clinician, and reproducible.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Clinical Outcomes of Platelet Rich Plasma Injection Versus Corticosteroid Injection for Baker's Cyst
Study Start Date : February 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : April 1, 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : April 1, 2017

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Steroids

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Platelets-Rich-Plasma Group
Patients will be asked to stop taking any type of anti-inflammatory medication from 7 days before the procedure to 2 weeks after and fasting for 3 hours before the procedure. At the moment of the procedure, the radiology team will draw 60ml of venous blood from the patient, the blood will be processed with different components of the PRP kit and centrifuged in the SmartPrep PRP machine, to obtain the PRP. The patient is then scanned prone using a linear 14 or 9 megahertz (MHz) transducer. A 20 Gauge spinal needle is usually employed for purposes of aspiration. Sterile saline will be used to confirm needle placement in the cyst in lieu of lidocaine and then inject the PRP by the radiologist.
Other: Platelets-Rich-Plasma
Platelet-Rich Plasma

Active Comparator: Corticosteroid group:
Patients will be asked to stop taking any kind of anti-inflammatory medication from 7 days before the procedure to 2 weeks after but fasting in this group won't be required. An ultrasound guided aspiration and triamcinolone (40 mg) diluted with lidocaine without epinephrine and ropivacaine will be used to anesthetize the tissues down to the cyst (including within the cyst for steroid injections). A compression bandage will be placed locally for 7 days. Investigators will monitor any side effect from the injection and treat the patients per standard care - this can include prescription of analgesics.
Drug: Corticosteroid
Corticosteroid




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Outcome of baker's cysts with the use of Platelets-Rich-Plasma versus Corticosteroid [ Time Frame: 6 Months ]
    Outcome measure will be determined through the use of the Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria which are used to clinically evaluate the presence of the popliteal cysts, pain, posterior sense of tension in the popliteal fossa and its clinical importance for range of motion reduction. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) will be used to assess short and long term outcome of knee related conditions.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Recurrence of baker's cysts treated on each group [ Time Frame: 6 Months ]
    Outcome measure will be determined through the use of the Visual Analogue Score (VAS) and the Rauschning and Lindgren criteria which are used to clinically evaluate the presence of the popliteal cysts, pain, posterior sense of tension in the popliteal fossa and its clinical importance for range of motion reduction. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) will be used to assess short and long term outcome of knee related conditions.

  2. Complications [ Time Frame: 6 Months ]
    All disease signs and symptoms experienced by the patient, as defined as an Adverse Event (AE), Treatment Emergent Adverse Event (TEAE), Serious Adverse Event (SAE), and Unexpected Adverse Device Effect (UADE), will be recorded from questionnaires during each study visit.

  3. Side effects [ Time Frame: 6 Months ]
    All disease signs and symptoms experienced by the patient, as defined as an Adverse Event (AE), Treatment Emergent Adverse Event (TEAE), Serious Adverse Event (SAE), and Unexpected Adverse Device Effect (UADE), will be recorded from questionnaires during each study visit.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 100 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients at least 18 years old.
  • Patients with baker's cyst who also present with at least one of the following: swelling, local pain or discomfort, limited range of motion or any other symptom directly caused by the baker's cyst.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Patients younger than 18 years old
  • Local or Systemic active infection
  • Active cancer treatment
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Diabetes
  • Hypersensitivity or allergy to Corticosteroid or Lidocaine

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02249377


Locations
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United States, New York
NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases - Center for Musculoskeletal Care
New York, New York, United States, 10016
Sponsors and Collaborators
NYU Langone Health
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Eric J Strauss, MD NYU Langone Medical Center

Publications:
Omer Mei-Dan and Michael R. Carmont. Novel Applications of Platelet-Rich Plasma Technology in Musculoskeletal Medicine and Surgery. Oper Tech Orthop 22:56-63 © 2012 Elsevier
Steven P. Arnoczky, Demetris Delos, Scott A. Rodeo. What Is Platelet-Rich Plasma? Oper Tech Sports Med 19:142-148 © 2011 Elsevier
Mikel Sánchez, Javier Albillos, Francisco Angulo, Juanma Santisteban, Isabel Andia. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Muscle and Tendon Healing. Oper Tech Orthop 22:16-24 © 2012 Elsevier
Andre F. Steinert, Kellie K. Middleton, Paulo H. Araujo, Freddie H. Fu. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine: Pearls, Pitfalls, and New Trends in Research. Oper Tech Orthop 22:91-103 © 2012 Elsevier
J.F. Kaux. Exuberant inflammatory reaction as a side effect of an infiltration of PRP. Médecine du sport (2) : tendinopathies (actualités) / Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 56S (2013) e215-e221

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Responsible Party: NYU Langone Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02249377     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 14-00457
First Posted: September 25, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 28, 2017
Last Verified: April 2017

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: Yes
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Product Manufactured in and Exported from the U.S.: No
Keywords provided by NYU Langone Health:
Baker's Cyst
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Cysts
Popliteal Cyst
Neoplasms
Pathological Conditions, Anatomical
Synovial Cyst