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Using Baby Books to Promote Maternal and Child Health

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02203617
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 30, 2014
Last Update Posted : April 14, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
University of California, Irvine
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Leonard Bickman, Vanderbilt University

Brief Summary:
The Baby Books Project tests whether embedding educational information into baby books can improve the health and wellbeing of first-time mothers and their young children.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Condition 1 - Educational Condition (Educational Book Group) Condition 2 - Non-educational Condition (Non-educational Book Group) Condition 3 - Control Condition (No-book Group) Behavioral: Educational Content/Pediatric Anticipatory Guidance Behavioral: Book provision Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

This study tests the efficacy of embedding educational information (i.e., pediatric anticipatory guidance) into baby books that first-time mothers read to their infants. This 3-group longitudinal study recruited first-time mothers in their third trimester of pregnancy, randomly assigned them to conditions, and followed them until the child was 18 months of age. One group received educational baby books, another group was given the same illustrated books with non-educational text, and the third group was not given any books. Thus, the effects of educational reading could be parsed from the effects of reading alone. The study aimed to test whether embedding pediatric anticipatory guidance in picture books is an effective method for increasing maternal knowledge of child development, parenting strategies, and safety practices, improving parenting beliefs and attitudes (e.g., parenting efficacy, importance of reading, use of corporal punishment), supporting optimal parenting practices (e.g., breastfeeding and nutrition, responsiveness, safety practices), improving maternal health (stress, depression), and supporting children's healthier development (injuries, illness, immunizations, and linguistic, social, and cognitive development).

Survey and observational data collection occurred in participants' homes during their third trimester of pregnancy and when their child was 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of age. Twelve phone call interviews were conducted between these home visits. When children were 18 months, a retrospective medical chart audit was conducted.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 198 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Double (Care Provider, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Using Baby Books to Promote Maternal and Child Health
Study Start Date : April 2005
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2009
Actual Study Completion Date : July 2010

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: educational baby books
books embedded with educational information (pediatric anticipatory guidance)
Behavioral: Educational Content/Pediatric Anticipatory Guidance
educational information from Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision for birth to 18 months

Behavioral: Book provision
Given free books prenatally and at 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months postpartum

Active Comparator: non-educational baby books
baby books given with same illustrations but no educational information
Behavioral: Book provision
Given free books prenatally and at 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months postpartum

No Intervention: no books
not given any baby books



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in knowledge of child development and parenting [ Time Frame: Change from Baseline (pregnancy) to 18 months postpartum ]
    Measured with Opinions about Babies questionnaire

  2. Change in Reading Practices [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    Self-reported joint reading practices

  3. Parenting Stress [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months post-partum ]
    Measured with the Parenting Stress Index

  4. Costs [ Time Frame: Cumulative costs over study duration ]
    Maternal costs due to their own and their child's illness/injury, use of substances, and purchase of food was measured with the Incurred Cost Questionnaire.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Safety Practices [ Time Frame: 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months postpartum ]
    Measured with the Home Safety Assessment, an observational and self-report measure of safety practices in the home, car, and outside

  2. Attitudes about Corporal punishment [ Time Frame: 2, 6, 12 and 18 months postpartum ]
    Adolescent-Adult Parenting Inventory

  3. Maternal Depressive Symptoms [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (pregnancy) to 18 months postpartum ]
    Depressive symptoms were measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.

  4. Beliefs about the Importance of Reading to Children [ Time Frame: Change from baseline (prenatal) to 18 months postpartum ]
    Maternal beliefs about the importance of reading was measured with the Modified Parent Reading Belief Inventory

  5. Injuries and illnesses [ Time Frame: 16 months (from 2 to 18 months postpartum) ]
    Child illnesses injuries were measured with the Incurred Cost Questionnaire and through a retrospective medical chart audit.

  6. Quality of Parent-Child Interaction [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    Video recording and in-vivo coding of mother-child dyads during play and reading.

  7. Home environment and parenting [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    measured with the Home Observation for Measurement of Environment (HOME).

  8. Receptive and Expressive language [ Time Frame: Change from 6 to 18 months postpartum ]
    Measured with the Preschool Language Scale - Fourth Edition (PLS4).

  9. Cognitive and neurological development screening [ Time Frame: 4, 6, 9 months postpartum ]
    Measured with the Bayley Infant Neurodevelopmental Screener (BINS)

  10. Infant nutrition [ Time Frame: 2, 4, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months postpartum ]
    Infant Nutrition Interview measured the introduction of news foods, types of foods, and serving portions at each time point.

  11. Breastfeeding intentions and practices [ Time Frame: prenatal and postnatal every visit until no longer breastfeeding ]
    measured with the Breastfeeding Intentions and Practices Scale

  12. Pregnancy uplifts and Hassles [ Time Frame: Baselines (pregnancy) ]
    measured with the Pregnancy Experience Scale

  13. Parenting Satisfaction [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    measured with the Parenting Satisfaction Scale

  14. Parenting Self-Efficacy [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    Measured with the Maternal Self-Efficacy Scale

  15. Reading self-efficacy [ Time Frame: Change from 2 to 18 months postpartum ]
    measured with the Reading Self-Efficacy Scale

  16. Cognitive Development [ Time Frame: 12 and 18 months postpartum ]
    measured with Exploratory Play Task

  17. Immunizations, medical visits, and growth status [ Time Frame: 18 months postpartum ]
    measured through a retrospective medical chart audit.


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Community Conditions [ Time Frame: 4 months postpartum and following a move to a new residence ]
    measured with the observational Community Conditions Checklist and self-report Community Conditions Interview



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 50 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Women who are pregnant with first child and able to read in English at a first grade reading level

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Women with other children, men, those not able to read in English at a first grade level

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02203617


Locations
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United States, California
University of California, Irvine
Irvine, California, United States, 92697
United States, Tennessee
Vanderbilt University
Nashville, Tennessee, United States, 37212
Sponsors and Collaborators
Vanderbilt University
University of California, Irvine
Investigators
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Study Director: Stephanie M Reich, PhD University of California, Irvine
Principal Investigator: Leonard Bickman, PhD Vanderbilt University

Publications of Results:
Other Publications:
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Responsible Party: Leonard Bickman, Professor, Vanderbilt University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02203617    
Other Study ID Numbers: R01HD447749
First Posted: July 30, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 14, 2017
Last Verified: April 2017
Keywords provided by Leonard Bickman, Vanderbilt University:
anticipatory guidance
baby books
safety
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Disease
Pathologic Processes