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Trial record 30 of 139 for:    (domestic or partner) AND (violence OR abuse)

Measuring Beliefs and Norms About Violence Against Women

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02202824
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 29, 2014
Last Update Posted : December 2, 2015
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Mbarara University of Science and Technology
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Alexander Tsai, Massachusetts General Hospital

Brief Summary:
The objective of our study was to determine the extent to which contextual information about the circumstances of intimate partner violence affects participants' responses to questions about their personal attitudes toward intimate partner violence.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Domestic Violence Other: Survey questionnaire Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

In national studies conducted throughout sub-Saharan Africa, survey data indicate that there is widespread acceptance of intimate partner violence by both men and women (Alio et al., 2011, Mann & Takyi, 2009, Rani et al., 2004, Uthman et al., 2009). For women, the proximate context of gender-unequal norms has important public health impacts. Men who report beliefs consistent with gender-unequal norms are more likely to be perpetrators of sexual violence (Shannon et al., 2012). Women are more likely to be victimized when they and their partners report concordant beliefs about the acceptability of intimate partner violence (Alio et al., 2011). And finally, women who live in areas characterized by gender-unequal norms about intimate partner violence are at greater risk for having their reproductive health compromised (Hung et al., 2012, Tsai & Subramanian, 2012). Accurate measurement of norms about intimate partner violence therefore has important implications for understanding the health risk environment for women.

The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), which are nationally representative surveys conducted worldwide, have served as an important source of information on norms about intimate partner violence. However, a cross-country analysis of DHS data showed that minor deviations in survey wording may account for substantial cross-country variation in the extent to which women provide survey responses consistent with acceptance of intimate partner violence (Yount et al., 2011). Furthermore, in-depth interviews conducted among Bangladeshi women suggest that affirmative responses to DHS-style questions may better reflect their perceptions of prevailing norms or their individualized assumptions about contextual details rather than true beliefs about their acceptance of intimate partner violence (Schuler & Islam, 2008, Schuler et al., 2011). Taken together, these lines of inquiry suggest important limitations in the accuracy with which the DHS measure women's attitudes towards intimate partner violence.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 1557 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Outcomes Assessor)
Official Title: Measuring Beliefs and Norms About Violence Against Women in Rural Uganda: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Study Start Date : July 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2015

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Survey questionnaire version 1
Study participants will receive version 1 of the survey questionnaire
Other: Survey questionnaire
Each of the scale versions elicits personal attitudes toward intimate partner violence and perceived norms about intimate partner violence, in a different fashion

Experimental: Survey questionnaire version 2
Study participants will receive version 2 of the survey questionnaire
Other: Survey questionnaire
Each of the scale versions elicits personal attitudes toward intimate partner violence and perceived norms about intimate partner violence, in a different fashion

Experimental: Survey questionnaire version 3
Study participants will receive version 3 of the survey questionnaire
Other: Survey questionnaire
Each of the scale versions elicits personal attitudes toward intimate partner violence and perceived norms about intimate partner violence, in a different fashion




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Personal attitudes toward intimate partner violence (5-item scale) [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
  2. Perceived norms about intimate partner violence (5-item scale) [ Time Frame: Baseline ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults aged 18 years and older
  • Emancipated minors aged 16-18 years
  • Considers Nyakabare Parish their primary place of residence
  • Capable of providing informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Minors younger than 18 years, with the exception of emancipated minors
  • Does not consider Nyakabare Parish their primary place of residence
  • Unable to communicate with research staff, e.g., due to deafness, mutism, or aphasia
  • Persons with psychosis, neurological damage, acute intoxication, or an intelligence quotient less than 70, as determined in the field by non-clinical research staff in consultation with a supervisor

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02202824


Locations
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Uganda
Mbarara University of Science and Technology
Mbarara, Uganda
Sponsors and Collaborators
Massachusetts General Hospital
Mbarara University of Science and Technology
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Alexander C Tsai, MD, PhD Massachusetts General Hospital
Principal Investigator: Bernard Kaukhikire, MBA Mbarara University of Science and Technology

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Alexander Tsai, Assistant in Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02202824     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: MH096620-S1
First Posted: July 29, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 2, 2015
Last Verified: November 2015