ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Dietary Intake After Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy —a 5 Year Study

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02193529
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified July 2014 by WEI-CHENG YAO, Min-Sheng General Hospital.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : July 17, 2014
Last Update Posted : July 17, 2014
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
WEI-CHENG YAO, Min-Sheng General Hospital

Brief Summary:

Weight reducing surgery is the only effective therapy for morbid obese patients.

Sleeve gastrectomy is a popular choice for bariatric surgery because of less sequela. There is poor knowledge about the nutritional status inpatients after LSG. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between dietary intake and weight loss after LSG.


Condition or disease
Morbid Obesity

Detailed Description:
Weight reducing surgery is the only effective therapy for morbid obese patients. Restrictive type surgery is safer than mal-absorptive type surgery. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is an effective surgery. In laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), about 90% of the stomach is surgically removed by vertical resection of the great curvature side, including the fundus. The simplicity of surgical procedures, the low occurrence of complications, and the efficiency of reducing excess weight have made LSG as a popular choice for bariatric surgery. After LSG, the amount of food eaten is drastically reduced, leading to nutritional deficiencies potentially. There is poor knowledge about the nutritional status inpatients after LSG. Some literatures suggest that LSG results in less nutritional deficiencies than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between dietary intake and weight loss after LSG.

Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 40 participants
Observational Model: Case-Only
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Weight Loss and Metabolic Surgery Center Min-Sheng General Hospital
Study Start Date : June 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2014
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Weight Control




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Dietary intake after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy 5 years [ Time Frame: up to 18 months ]
    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between dietary intake and weight loss effect after sleeve gastrectomy.The calculation of the majority of the nutrients is based on Australian nutrient composition data. The item include: energy ( kcal/day), protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamin and minerals.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
morbid obesity patients received laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for more then 5 years. BMI above 40 kg/m2 when operation. Age 18-65 years old.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • morbid obesity patients received laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for more then 5 years.

BMI above 40 kg/m2 when operation. Age 18-65 years old. No major psychosis or binge eating disorder. No endocrine disease. failed to lose weight with medical therapy.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • current hepatitis, under steroid treatment,cancer, thyroid disease,alcoholism.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02193529


Contacts
Contact: Ju J Chou, university 886933164297 n002434@e-ms.com.tw
Contact: Jung C Chen, university 886933164297 jackykenzero@gmail.com

Locations
Taiwan
Weight Loss and Metabolic Surgery Center Min-Sheng General Hospital Recruiting
Taoyuan, Taiwan, 330
Contact: Ju J Chou, university    886933164297    n002434@e-ms.com.tw   
Contact: Jung C Chen, university    886933164297    jackykenzero@gmail.com   
Principal Investigator: Ju J Chou, university         
Sponsors and Collaborators
Min-Sheng General Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Ju J Chou, university School of Nutrition and Health Sciences,Taipei Medical University

Responsible Party: WEI-CHENG YAO, Institutional Review Board, Min-Sheng General Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02193529     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: DIA-LSG
DIA5y ( Other Identifier: Asia Pacific Bariatric surgery center )
First Posted: July 17, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 17, 2014
Last Verified: July 2014

Keywords provided by WEI-CHENG YAO, Min-Sheng General Hospital:
sleeve gastrectomy, dietary intake, morbid obesity.

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Obesity, Morbid
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms