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Trial record 1 of 1 for:    NCT02136368
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Body and Brain Exercise for Older Adults With Memory Complaints

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02136368
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 13, 2014
Last Update Posted : September 7, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Rob Petrella, Lawson Health Research Institute

Brief Summary:
The purpose of this study is to investigate whether an exercise class with a cognitive (or brain) training component was more effective than a usual combined aerobic and resistance exercise class for older adults with cognitive complaints (such as concerns about changes in memory or thinking skills). It is hypothesized that the group randomized to the exercise class that includes additional brain training will have greater improvements in brain health.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Cognitive Ability, General Behavioral: Multi-modal exercise Behavioral: Mind-Motor Exercise Behavioral: Balance and range of motion exercises Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Older adults with self-reported cognitive complaints (CCs) may be at increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Cognitive decline in older adults, particularly reduced memory and executive function is associated with functional decline, institutionalization, and increased health care costs. Similarly, cardiovascular risk factors have been associated with cognitive and functional impairment in aging. Aerobic exercise has been shown to improve vascular function and blood flow in the brain's prefrontal cortex. In turn, resistance training can produce functional changes within distinct cortical regions during the encoding and recall of association tasks and has been shown to increase circulating neural growth factors (i.e., a proposed mechanism by which cognition may be preserved or improved in old age). Recent evidence also suggests that cognitive training may improve the cognitive performance of older adults.

Therefore, we will investigate the impact of a combined exercise program (multi-modality exercise; M2) compared to a combined exercise program with a cognitive component (multi-modality, mind-motor exercise; M4) on cognition, cognitive-motor, mobility, neural functioning and vascular outcomes in older adults with cognitive complaints. Community-based exercise programs for older adults provide widespread access, are relatively inexpensive, and provide opportunities for social interaction.

The primary purpose of this study is to compare the effects of the M2 and M4 exercise programs on brain health. This study will also examine the effects of the different exercise programs on cardiovascular risk factors and mobility. In a subset of participants, cognitive-motor and neural functioning outcomes will be examined.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 127 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: A Combined Exercise Program Plus Cognitive Training for Older Adults With Self-reported Cognitive Complaints: The Multi-modal, Mind-motor (M4) Study
Study Start Date : January 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : March 2016

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Multi-Modal, Mind Motor Exercise (M4)
Attend 60 minute exercise class three times per week for 24 weeks. Exercise class includes 45 minutes of multi-modal exercise and 15 minutes of mind-motor exercise.
Behavioral: Multi-modal exercise
Community-based group exercise classes following Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging exercise guidelines. Exercise classes consist of 5 min warm-up, 20 min aerobic exercise, 5 min aerobic cool-down, 10 min full-body resistance exercise, 5 min stretching (total 45 min)
Other Name: Exercise intervention

Behavioral: Mind-Motor Exercise
Square Step Exercise involves mimicking a stepping pattern demonstrated by an instructor. The stepping patterns become progressively difficult and involve forward, backward, lateral and diagonal movements on a 250cm long mat with 25cm square grids (15 min).
Other Name: Square Stepping Exercise

Active Comparator: Multi-Modal Exercise (M2)
Attend 60 minute exercise class three times per week for 24 weeks. Exercise class includes 45 minutes of multi-modal exercise and 15 minutes of balance and range of motion exercises.
Behavioral: Multi-modal exercise
Community-based group exercise classes following Canadian Centre for Activity and Aging exercise guidelines. Exercise classes consist of 5 min warm-up, 20 min aerobic exercise, 5 min aerobic cool-down, 10 min full-body resistance exercise, 5 min stretching (total 45 min)
Other Name: Exercise intervention

Behavioral: Balance and range of motion exercises
Community-based group exercise designed to improve balance and range of motion of the joints (15 min)




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Composite score from Cambridge Brain Sciences Cognitive Battery - 12 tasks [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    To assess global cognitive function


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Composite score from Cambridge Brain Sciences Cognitive Battery - 12 tasks [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    To assess global cognitive function

  2. Gait variability (stride time) under dual-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Gait variability is the stride-to-stride fluctuations of the way someone walks and will be calculated as the coefficient of variation of step length (SD/mean x100). Measured with GAITRite system.

  3. Gait variability (stride time) under single-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Gait variability is the stride-to-stride fluctuations of the way someone walks and will be calculated as the coefficient of variation of step length (SD/mean x100). Measured with GAITRite system.

  4. Gait velocity (speed) under dual-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average walking speed (gait velocity) measured with the GAITRite system

  5. Gait velocity (speed) under single-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average walking speed (gait velocity) measured with the GAITRite system

  6. Step length (average) under dual-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Mean step length calculated from GAITRite system

  7. Step length (average) under single-task conditions [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Mean step length calculated from GAITRite system

  8. Carotid Artery Compliance [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Measured from non-invasive vascular assessment with B-mode Ultrasound over the carotid artery (in the neck).

  9. Carotid Artery Intima-media thickness [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Measured from non-invasive vascular assessment with B-mode Ultrasound over the carotid artery (in the neck).

  10. Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average systolic blood pressure over a 24 hour time period.

  11. Clinic Systolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average systolic blood pressure from in clinic final 2 (out of 3) readings

  12. Ambulatory Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average diastolic blood pressure over a 24 hour time period.

  13. Clinic Diastolic Blood Pressure [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Average diastolic blood pressure from in clinic final 2 (out of 3) readings

  14. Composite score of memory tasks from Cambridge Brain Sciences Cognitive Battery [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
  15. Composite score of executive function tasks from Cambridge Brain Sciences Cognitive Battery [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
  16. Composite score of concentration tasks from Cambridge Brain Sciences Cognitive Battery [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
  17. Total balance score [ Time Frame: 6 & 12 months ]
    Total score calculated from the the Fullerton Advanced Balance scale


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Prosaccade reaction time in response to flash of light. [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    The reaction time of the eye when instructed to look toward a flash of light.

  2. Change in blood flow to the pre-frontal cortex in response to a randomly selected cognitive task. [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Neuroimaging assessment with functional magnetic resonance imaging

  3. Antisaccade reaction time in response to flash of light. [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    The reaction time of the eye when instructed to look away from a flash of light.

  4. Change in blood flow to the parietal cortex in response to a randomly selected cognitive task. [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Neuroimaging assessment with functional magnetic resonance imaging



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   55 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • aged 55 years or older
  • self-reported cognitive complaint (defined as answering yes to the question "Do you feel like your memory or thinking skills have gotten worse recently?).
  • independent on instrumental activities of daily living

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Probable Dementia (i.e., diagnosis OR Mini-Mental State Examination score <24)
  • Other neurological conditions or major psychiatric disorders (i.e., Parkinson's disease; bipolar disorder)
  • Previous history of severe cardiovascular conditions (i.e., myocardial infarction or stroke <1-year ago; end stage congestive heart failure; end stage renal disease)
  • Severe sensory impairment (i.e., blind)
  • Significant orthopedic conditions (i.e., severe osteoarthritis)
  • Clinical depression (determined via >=16 on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies - Depression Scale AND review by primary study physician)
  • Have blood pressure >180/100 mmHg or <100/60 mmHg
  • Unable to comprehend questionnaire material
  • Any other factors that could potentially limit ability to fully participate in the intervention

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02136368


Locations
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Canada, Ontario
Gymnasium
Woodstock, Ontario, Canada, N4V 0B1
Sponsors and Collaborators
Lawson Health Research Institute
Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Robert J Petrella, MD, PhD University of Western Ontario, Canada
Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Rob Petrella, Principal Investigator, Lawson Health Research Institute
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02136368    
Other Study ID Numbers: M4W18858
First Posted: May 13, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 7, 2016
Last Verified: September 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No
Keywords provided by Rob Petrella, Lawson Health Research Institute:
older adults
multiple-modality exercise
mind-motor exercise
self-reported cognitive complaints
global cognitive functioning
mobility
vascular function
sensorimotor function
brain imaging
community-based research
subjective cognitive complaints