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Trial record 39 of 663 for:    SMS

The Impact Of Text Message (SMS) Reminders On Helmet Use Among Motorcycle Drivers In Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02120742
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 23, 2014
Last Update Posted : September 30, 2015
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Amend

Brief Summary:
This study seeks to evaluate the impact of a text-message (SMS) program delivered to motorcycle drivers in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The SMS program, delivered by nonprofit Amend, sends daily reminders to motorcycle drivers to remind them to wear their helmets. In this study, the investigators will conduct a randomized controlled trial to see if this program leads to increased helmet use over time. The investigators will recruit between 350-400 motorcycle drivers to receive the text program. The investigators will obtain each of their cell phone numbers, and the participants will be split into three groups. The first group will receive reminders framed as social norming (ie "Most of your peers wear helmets"). The second group will receive reminders framed as fear appeals (ie "Not wearing your helmet increases your chance of dying in an accident"). The third group will act as the control and receive texts that relate to general road safety, but not helmet use. All groups will receive the same general road safety information being delivered to the control arm. The purpose of sending different types of reminders is to assess which type of messages are more likely to cause a motorcycle driver to regularly wear their helmet. The investigators will survey the participants at the initiation of the study and after weeks 3 and 6 during the study, asking about their helmet use. This will be a short survey, and any personal information gathered during the study (ie, phone numbers), will be securely stored so as to protect their privacy.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Road Traffic Injury Prevention Helmet Use mHealth Intervention Behavioral: SMS message reminder Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 391 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: The Impact Of Text Message (SMS) Reminders On Helmet Use Among Motorcycle Drivers In Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania
Study Start Date : April 2014
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : September 2015

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Social Norming
The first group will receive SMS message reminders framed as social norming (ie "Most of your peers wear helmets").
Behavioral: SMS message reminder
SMS texts will be delivered to study participants over a 6-week period.

Experimental: Fear Appeal
The second group will receive SMS message reminders framed as fear appeals (ie "Not wearing your helmet increases your chance of dying in an accident").
Behavioral: SMS message reminder
SMS texts will be delivered to study participants over a 6-week period.

Placebo Comparator: Control
The third group will act as the control and receive texts that relate to general road safety, but not helmet use.
Behavioral: SMS message reminder
SMS texts will be delivered to study participants over a 6-week period.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Self-reported adherence to helmet use [ Time Frame: Midpoint of study (3 weeks) ]
    The primary outcome of the study will be self-reported adherence to helmet use as measured by the proportion of participants who wear their helmet on all trips

  2. Self-reported adherence to helmet use [ Time Frame: Endpoint of study (6 weeks) ]
    The primary outcome of the study will be self-reported adherence to helmet use as measured by the proportion of participants who wear their helmet on all trips


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Attitude change [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    A secondary outcome will be participants' attitudes toward helmet use and the SMS reminder platform, as measured by an open-ended survey at the end of the study.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age 18 or older
  • Must own a cell phone with text-message features
  • Must demonstrate ability to retrieve and read text-messages
  • Must have access to a helmet.

Exclusion Criteria:


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02120742


Locations
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Tanzania
Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences
Dar es Salaam, Upanga West, Tanzania, 65001
Sponsors and Collaborators
Amend
Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center

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Responsible Party: Amend
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02120742     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: D14103
First Posted: April 23, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 30, 2015
Last Verified: September 2015
Keywords provided by Amend:
Road traffic injury prevention
Helmet use
mHealth intervention