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Complications and Functional Outcome of Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures in Patients Younger Than 70 Years

This study is currently recruiting participants.
See Contacts and Locations
Verified July 2016 by Stefan Bartels, University Hospital, Akershus
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Ullevaal University Hospital
Haukeland University Hospital
Vestre Viken Hospital Trust
Lund University Hospital
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Stefan Bartels, University Hospital, Akershus
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT02085707
First received: March 9, 2014
Last updated: July 18, 2016
Last verified: July 2016
  Purpose
Patients younger than 70 years with a displaced femoral neck are in serious conditions. The femoral neck fracture is associated with low activity levels, hip pain and substantially reduced quality of life. Relatively young individuals with low-energy fractures tend to have additional morbidity or lower bone quality. The literature indicates that 5 % of all displaced femoral neck fractures are in patients aged 55 - 70 years. Little research and lack of consensus and guidance about appropriate treatment of these patients renders choice of treatment, and the health economic aspect a great challenge. In this study the investigators aim to answer if patients aged 55 - 70 years with displaced and low-energy femoral neck fractures treated with a total hip arthroplasty leads to a better functional outcome than osteosynthesis, and can patient-related factors be identified that predispose for femoral fracture? It is a randomized multi center study of patients operated with either total hip arthroplasty or osteosynthesis in which functional outcome, complications and reoperations are compared for the 2 groups. Additional controls are done after 4 and 12 months; 2 and possibly after 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20 years. Map patient - related factors that predispose for displaced femoral neck fractures for patients aged 55 - 70 years. Map bone density measured with Dexa for two types of surgical procedures. Map complications and functional outcome after osteosynthesis or total hip replacement in patients aged 55 - 70 years with displaced femoral neck fractures.

Condition Intervention
Femoral Neck Fractures Osteoporosis Procedure: Total hip replacement arthroplasty Procedure: Closed reduction and internal fixation

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Double (Participant, Care Provider)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Complications and Functional Outcome of Displaced Femoral Neck Fractures Treated With Internal Fixation vs Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients Younger Than 70 Years. A Randomized Controlled Double Blind Multi Center Trial.

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Stefan Bartels, University Hospital, Akershus:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Harris Hip score [ Time Frame: 12 months ]

Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Harris Hip Score [ Time Frame: 4 months and 2 years ]
  • QoL questionnaire (EQ-5D) [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
    Measure of health status from the EuroQol

  • Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • VAS [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • Complications [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]

    Incidence of complications. General complications, f.ex: urinary tract infections, venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, mortality.

    Per- and postoperative complications related to method, f.ex: fracture of the femur, bleeding, cut- out, caput necrosis, infection, luxation, periprosthetic fracture, component loosening.


  • Reoperation [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • Morbidity [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • Mortality [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • Charlson comorbidity index [ Time Frame: 4 and 12 months, 2 years ]
  • Bonedensity [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Dexa measurement hip, collumna and distal radius.


Estimated Enrollment: 118
Study Start Date: December 2013
Estimated Study Completion Date: January 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date: January 2018 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Active Comparator: Total hip replacement arthroplasty
59 off 118 patients will be randomized to total hip replacement arthroplasty
Procedure: Total hip replacement arthroplasty
treatment with total hip replacement arthroplasty with the implant chosen by the institution
Active Comparator: Closed reduction and internal fixation

59 off 118 patients will be randomized to closed reduction and internal fixation.

2 cancellous parallel hip pins

Procedure: Closed reduction and internal fixation
treatment with closed reduction and internal fixation with 2 cannulated hip pins

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Ages Eligible for Study:   55 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Patients with displaced femoral neck fractures Garden 3 or 4
  • Age between 55 - 70 years
  • Able to walk before injury

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Refusal to participate.
  • Pathological fractures for other reasons than osteoporosis.
  • Senility or dementia or lack of competence to give informed consent to participate
  • Fracture on the opposite side at the same time
  • Expected life duration less than 12 months and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 4 + 5
  • Amputated leg
  • Serious neurological disease that renders THA unsuitable
  • Substance narcotic abuse
  • Previous inclusion in the present study
  Contacts and Locations
Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the Contacts provided below. For general information, see Learn About Clinical Studies.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02085707

Contacts
Contact: Stefan Bartels, MD 91502900 ext 0047 stba@ahus.no
Contact: Stein Erik Utvåg, PhD 91502900 ext 0047 stein.erik.utvag@medisin.uio.no

Locations
Norway
Vestre Viken HF Not yet recruiting
Bærum, Akershus, Norway, 1346
Contact: Wender Figved, PhD    91503525 ext 0047      
Principal Investigator: Wender Figved, PhD         
University Hospital, Akershus Recruiting
Lørenskog, Akershus, Norway, 1478
Contact: Stefan Bartels, MD    91502900 ext 0047    stba@ahus.no   
Haukeland University Hospital Not yet recruiting
Bergen, Hordaland, Norway, 5021
Contact: Jan- Erik Gjertsen, PhD    55985000 ext 0047      
Principal Investigator: Jan-Erik Gjertsen, PhD         
Ullevaal University Hospital Not yet recruiting
Oslo, Norway, 0450
Contact: Frede Frihagen, PhD    22118080 ext 0047      
Principal Investigator: Frede Frihagen, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Akershus
Ullevaal University Hospital
Haukeland University Hospital
Vestre Viken Hospital Trust
Lund University Hospital
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Torbjørn Omland, Professor University Hospital, Akershus
  More Information

Publications:

Responsible Party: Stefan Bartels, MD Senior Consultant, University Hospital, Akershus
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02085707     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Akershus UH
Sophies Minde Ortopedi AS ( Other Identifier: Sophies Minde Ortopedi AS )
Study First Received: March 9, 2014
Last Updated: July 18, 2016
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Femoral Neck Fractures
Fractures, Bone
Osteoporosis
Wounds and Injuries
Bone Diseases, Metabolic
Bone Diseases
Musculoskeletal Diseases
Hip Fractures
Femoral Fractures
Hip Injuries
Leg Injuries

ClinicalTrials.gov processed this record on August 18, 2017