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Metabolic Response to Playing Video Games: Two Arm Trial

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075827
Recruitment Status : Unknown
Verified February 2014 by University College, London.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
First Posted : March 3, 2014
Last Update Posted : March 3, 2014
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University College, London

Brief Summary:

Previous studies have shown that subjects who play video games are prone to consume larger quantities of food than subjects who are simply resting. This is believed to be due to the development of a stress response in the video games group, resulting in increased fuel metabolism. However, it was shown that the energy intake of the two groups showed no correlation with the subjects' appetite/hunger, which was identical in both groups.

The investigators propose to explore this issue further by comparing the effects of different types of video games on metabolism, using a randomized controlled trial. In this study, they will compare the stress levels, heart rate, blood pressure, appetite/mood, energy consumption, grip strength, memory and saliva cortisol, leptin and ghrelin levels of subjects playing (a) competitive and (b) problem-solving video games. Measurements will be taken preceding, during and after the 1 hour intervention. Following the intervention, participants will be offered savoury and sweet foods/drinks, which will allow us to assess their appetite preferences and caloric intake.

The investigators first aim is to determine whether there is a significant difference in stress levels, eating habits and energy metabolism in the two groups. Our second aim is to determine whether there is a difference in glucose distribution to the muscles and brain between the two groups.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Appetite and General Nutritional Disorders Sedentary Lifestyle Behavioral: Competitive video game Behavioral: Little Big Planet Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The investigators study is designed to test experimentally whether different kinds of video game generate different types of metabolic response. The exposure comprises one-hour of video game playing, with 36 young men randomized to each group (ie 72 in total).

Prior to the exposure, they will collect baseline data on heart rate, blood pressure, anthropometry (weight, height, waist girth), grip strength and cognitive function (memory test), as well as appetite/mood by visual analogue scale (VAS). The investigators will also collect a baseline saliva sample to assess hormones associated with stress (cortisol) or satiety (leptin, ghrelin). The subject will arrive after and overnight fast and will be given a standardised breakfast. After these baseline data are collected, the randomization envelope will be opened and the subject assigned to his group.

Heart rate will be monitored continuously during the study. At 20 and 40 minutes during the intervention, as well as when it ceases at 60 minutes, the investigators will collect further data on blood pressure and appetite/mood by VAS. At 60 minutes, the investigators will repeat measurement of memory and grip strength, and collect a second saliva sample.

For 20 minutes after the end of the intervention, the subject will be allowed to rest, reading magazines, and will be able to select from a range of snack foods (savoury, sweet, fruit), and drinks (sweetened beverages, water). Consumption of calories will be calculated. At the end of this period, final measurements of blood pressure and VAS will be collected, and the subject will depart.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 72 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Metabolic Response to Playing Video Games: Two Arm Trial
Study Start Date : February 2014
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 2014

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Problem-solving video game
Playing the video game 'Little Big Planet'
Behavioral: Little Big Planet
1 hour playing video game
Other Name: Little Big Planet (Sony Computer Entertainment

Experimental: Competitive video game
Playing the video game 'Call of Duty'
Behavioral: Competitive video game
1 hour playing video game
Other Name: 'Call of Duty' (Activision)




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Food intake [ Time Frame: At end of 1-hour video game intervention ]
    Subjects will be offered a selection of snacks and drinks over a 20 minute period, and their rates of food intake will be calculated


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Blood pressure [ Time Frame: At 20, 40 and 60 minutes of intervention, and after 20 minutes rest post-intervention ]
    Blood pressure will be measured in duplicate at 1 minute intervals by digital instrument

  2. Heart rate [ Time Frame: Continuously, starting during baseline period, from 0 to 60 minutes during intervention, and for 20 minutes post-intervention rest period ]
    Heart rate will be measured using a polar digital heart rate monitor

  3. Salivary leptin [ Time Frame: After 60 minutes from start of intervention ]
    Salivary leptin will be analysed using ELISA

  4. Salivary ghrelin [ Time Frame: After 60 minutes from start of intervention ]
    Salivary ghrelin will be assessed using ELISA

  5. Salivary cortisol [ Time Frame: After 60 minutes from start of intervention ]
    Salivary cortisol will be assessed using ELISA

  6. Visual analogue scale [ Time Frame: At 20, 40 and 60 minutes of intervention, and after 20 minutes rest post-intervention ]
    Visual analogue scale will be used to collect subjective data on mood and appetite

  7. Grip strength [ Time Frame: After 60 minutes from start of intervention ]
    Grip strength will be assessed by hand-grip dynamometer, using the average of three measurements for each arm

  8. Memory recall [ Time Frame: After 60 minutes from start of intervention ]
    Subjects will be shown images for a set time to allow memorization, and then be given another set time to recall as many of these images as possible



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy adult males with BMI <25 kg/m2

Exclusion Criteria:

  • smoking
  • a significant weight change (>3kg) within the previous three months
  • any psychiatric disorder
  • uncontrolled hypertension
  • coronary heart disease
  • heart failure
  • central/peripheral arteriopathies
  • excessive alcohol consumption (<21 units/week).

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02075827


Contacts
Contact: Panos Michael +44(0)7546842700 panos.michael.11@ucl.ac.uk
Contact: Jonathan CK Wells, PhD +44(0)2079052389 Jonathan.Wells@ucl.ac.uk

Locations
United Kingdom
UCL Institute of Child Health Recruiting
London, United Kingdom, WC1N 1EH
Contact: Panos Michael    +44(0)7546842700    panos.michael.11@ucl.ac.uk   
Principal Investigator: Jonathan CK Wells, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
University College, London
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Jonathan CK Wells, PhD UCL Institute of Child Health

Publications:
Responsible Party: University College, London
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02075827     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UCL0326011
First Posted: March 3, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 3, 2014
Last Verified: February 2014

Keywords provided by University College, London:
Appetite, metabolism, sedentary behaviour, stress response

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Nutrition Disorders