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REWARD SYSTEM RESPONSES TO FOOD AROMAS

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02041039
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : January 20, 2014
Last Update Posted : August 7, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Robert Considine, Indiana University School of Medicine

Brief Summary:
Food aromas are a part of foods' flavor, and can promote overeating. Alcohol consumption also stimulates appetite, and contributes to overeating while under alcohol's acute effects. Knowing the brain regions that respond to food aromas and alcohol, and how they are modified by the amount of body fat and alcohol exposure, will provide critical information about the neural systems that underlie loss of control of eating. Therefore, the main hypotheses of this study are that: A) Lean and obese subjects have different brain responses to food aromas that enhance desire to eat, and B) Acute alcohol intoxication i) enhances the brain's response to food odors, and ii) affects brain systems that inhibit or terminate eating. To test these hypotheses, we have modified functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms successfully used to study alcoholic drink aromas in subjects at risk for alcoholism.

Condition or disease
Adiposity

Detailed Description:
Food aromas are powerful appetitive cues that are intrinsic to foods' flavor and hedonic qualities, and such cues can facilitate overeating. Alcohol consumption similarly "primes" appetite, and contributes to overeating while under alcohol's acute effects. Knowing the brain loci that respond to such naturalistic appetitive stimuli, and how they are modified by body fat and alcohol exposure, will provide critical insights about the neural systems that underlie loss of control of eating. Therefore, the main hypotheses of this study are that: A) Lean and obese subjects have different limbic responses to the olfactory cues that enhance motivation to eat, and B) Acute alcohol intoxication i) potentiates the brain's reward system response to food odors, and ii) affects brain systems involved in behavioral inhibition and eating restraint. To test these hypotheses, we have modified functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms successfully used to study alcoholic drink aromas in subjects at risk for alcoholism.

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Study Type : Observational
Observational Model: Case-Control
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Study Start Date : October 2010
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 2020

Group/Cohort
normal weight
non-smoking, right handed women age 18-40 years BMI between 18-25 kg/m2
overweight/obese
non-smoking, right-handed women age 18-40 year BMI 30-50 kg/m2 (maximum weight 350 pounds, shoulder width no greater than 23/5 inches)



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. neural response to food odor [ Time Frame: 1 month ]


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
subjects to be drawn from the Indianapolis and greater metropolitan area
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • non smoking, right handed women 18-40 years
  • good health without self reported neurological or psychiatric disorder
  • no indication of eating disorders
  • normal sense of smell

Exclusion Criteria:

  • pregnant,/breast feeding women
  • history of drug abuse/dependence, positive drug screen for amphetamines/methamphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, cannabinoids, cocaine, opiates or PCP
  • DSM-IV axis I psychiatric disorders or head injury with loss of consciousness
  • contraindications to MRI (ferrous material, claustrophobia)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02041039


Contacts
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Contact: Robert V Considine, Ph.D. 317-278-0373

Locations
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United States, Indiana
Indiana University School of Medicine Recruiting
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States, 46202
Contact    317-278-0373      
Sponsors and Collaborators
Robert Considine
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Robert Considine, Professor of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02041039     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: R01DK089070 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: January 20, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 7, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight
Signs and Symptoms