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Trial record 23 of 663 for:    SMS

The Impact of Prenatal Short Messages (SMS) on Maternal and Newborn Health (SMS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02037087
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : January 15, 2014
Last Update Posted : April 7, 2016
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Health Science Center of Xi’an Jiaotong University
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Yanfang Su, Harvard School of Public Health

Brief Summary:
It is hypothesized that delivering short messages (SMS) to pregnant women can improve maternal and newborn health outcomes. This pilot offers mothers-to-be in rural China free daily short messages (SMS) via cell phone. The aim is to advise them on (a) good household prenatal practices (GHPP) and (b) care seeking (CS) in order to improve the quality of life for mothers and newborns.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Short Message Service Text Messaging Behavioral: Good household prenatal practice Behavioral: Care seeking Behavioral: Full bank of SMS Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Factorial quasi-randomization is utilized to compare two groups of interventions (i.e., GHPP and CS) as well as to compare these individual interventions with a combination of the interventions. It is also possible that distinct treatments have interaction effects, and we plan to test for this. Policymakers are interested in using different strategies to enhance neonatal health. For example, the bank of SMS developed by our team is a combination of several components: reminders for regular checkups, information on GHPP, and information on CS. From a policy perspective, the evaluation of the full bank of SMS may be sufficient for the government to decide whether or not to scale up the full bank of SMS. However, to understand maternal behavior and, for policy purposes, to understand which components in the bank of SMS should be scaled up, it is important to disentangle which component contributes most to final neonatal health. Taken together, are all the components of the bank of SMS effective in changing maternal behavior and enhancing neonatal health? Which mechanisms are at play, good household prenatal care, care seeking in pregnancy, or both?

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 4467 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Factorial Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Official Title: The Impact of Prenatal Short Messages on Maternal and Newborn Health
Study Start Date : September 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : October 2015
Actual Study Completion Date : March 2016

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Good household prenatal practice (GHPP)
The GHPP arm receives SMS messages regarding knowledge on nutrition, labor, non-medical pain management, breastfeeding, and depression. This arm also receives messages delivered to the control group.
Behavioral: Good household prenatal practice
Knowledge on nutrition, labor, non-medical pain management, breastfeeding and depression

Experimental: Care seeking (CS)
The CS arm receives SMS messages which include danger-sign recognition and reminders for government-subsidized projects. This arm also receives messages delivered to the control group.
Behavioral: Care seeking
  • Danger-sign recognition
  • Reminders for government projects

Experimental: Full bank of SMS
This arm receives the SMS messages delivered to the GHPP, CS and control group.
Behavioral: Full bank of SMS
  • Danger-sign recognition
  • Reminders for government projects
  • Knowledge on nutrition, labor, non-medical pain management, breastfeeding and depression

No Intervention: Control

Control group receives SMS messages regarding:

  • Reminders of prenatal visits and certified skilled attendance of labor (status quo);
  • Fetal development in different gestational stages.

The three experimental groups receive the control messages as well.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Newborn health [ Time Frame: the first month after birth ]
    Newborn health is measured by appropriateness of weight for gestational age.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Neonatal Adverse Outcome Indicator (NAOI) [ Time Frame: the first month after birth ]
    The NAOI focuses on measuring severe neonatal morbidity.

  2. Actual number of prenatal visits over expected visits [ Time Frame: In the duration of pregnancy, an expected average of 9 months ]
  3. Uptake of government-subsidized programs [ Time Frame: In the duration of pregnancy, an expected average of 9 months, and 1 month after birth ]

    This outcome is measured by the following metrics:

    1. Duration of folic acid
    2. Uptake of infant vaccinations

  4. C-section rate [ Time Frame: child birth ]
  5. Maternal health [ Time Frame: Child birth and 1 year after birth ]
    Maternal health is measured by change of perception in general health and postpartum depression.

  6. Near-miss [ Time Frame: In the duration of pregnancy, an expected average of 9 months, and childbirth ]
    The near-miss focuses on measuring severe maternal morbidity.

  7. Psychological outcomes [ Time Frame: In the duration of pregnancy, an expected average of 9 months ]
    Attitudes, personal norms, self-efficacy, social desirability, intentions, plans, susceptibility, expectations, and severity



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 45 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria
There were two inclusion criteria: Local pregnant women must 1) own a cell phone in the household, and 2) visit a MCHC for antenatal care during pregnancy.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02037087


Locations
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China, Shaanxi
Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xi'an, Shaanxi, China, 710049
Sponsors and Collaborators
Harvard School of Public Health
Health Science Center of Xi’an Jiaotong University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Yanfang Su, MA Harvard School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Zhongliang Zhou, PhD Health Science Center of Xi’an Jiaotong University
Principal Investigator: Changzheng Yuan, MS Harvard School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Jesse Heitner, MPP Harvard School of Public Health
Principal Investigator: Benjamin Campbell, BA Dartmouth College

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Yanfang Su, ScD, Harvard School of Public Health
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02037087     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: newborn2013
First Posted: January 15, 2014    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 7, 2016
Last Verified: April 2016
Keywords provided by Yanfang Su, Harvard School of Public Health:
Short Message Service
newborn health
maternal behavior
good household pregnancy practice
care seeking