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Trial record 2 of 12 for:    18779236 [PUBMED-IDS]

Clinical Assessment of a Novel Microprobe Array Continuous Glucose Monitor for Type 1 Diabetes

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01908530
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 25, 2013
Last Update Posted : August 2, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Imperial College London

Brief Summary:
The purpose of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy of the Imperial College Microprobe Array Continuous Glucose Sensor in healthy volunteers and in subjects with type 1 diabetes.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Diabetes Mellitus Device: Microprobe glucose sensor Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Continuous knowledge of ambient glucose levels will be of benefit to patients with T1DM, especially those with troublesome hypoglycaemia. Existing monitors require skin puncture to access interstitial fluid and sense its glucose content. Despite their clinical benefits, their use is associated with discomfort and their accuracy is questionable in hypoglycaemia. The development of a painless continuous glucose monitor is regarded as the top research priority by patients with diabetes. A novel continuous glucose monitoring device has been developed at Imperial College based on microprobe technology. It consists of a small, wearable patch (~1 cm2), the size of a conventional postage stamp, containing microscopic projections (microprobes) that penetrate only the outermost skin layer. It accesses interstitial fluid to sense its glucose content without stimulating skin nerve fibres or reaching blood vessels within skin layers. The microprobe surface has the consistency of sandpaper. It is pushed into the skin with an applicator allowing it to penetrate through the skin layers and access the interstitial fluid in a minimally invasive manner. The device is disposable and optimum performance will be assessed over five days. The advantages of microprobe technology have been demonstrated in other clinical situations and include painless insertion, absence of bleeding and a low infection risk. The large surface area utilised in our microprobe device has the potential to improve device sensitivity and accuracy. Pre-clinical validation tests have demonstrated the ability of the device to respond accurately to variable glucose concentrations and to penetrate the outermost skin layer without fracture. We aim now to further develop the device through clinical studies in non-diabetic subjects and subjects with type 1 diabetes to allow painless accurate continuous glucose monitoring.

The study will recruit 16 non-diabetic subjects and 20 subjects with type 1 diabetes.

It will be conducted over four phases;

oPhase 1 will assess safety, as a primary outcome, and efficacy, as a secondary outcome, in non-diabetic subjects over six hours in the clinical research facility where the device will be fitted and a cannula inserted for venous sampling every 15 minutes to measure venous blood glucose (YSI). Safety will be assessed with regards to skin inflammation and pain. Efficacy will be assessed in this phase by assessing magnitude of current measured by the microprobe array sensor and comparison of measured ISF glucose concentrations to simultaneous venous blood glucose samples (YSI).

oPhase 2 will also assess safety, as a primary outcome, and efficacy, as a secondary outcome, in non-diabetic subjects over a period of 24 hours. The first six hours in the clinical research facility (same as phase 1), then subject will be allowed to go home with the device to assess safety over that period.

oPhase 3 aims to assess efficacy of the device as a primary outcome and safety as a secondary outcome. This will be in subjects with type 1 diabetes over 24 hours as inpatients. Efficacy will be assessed mechanically (by the ability to penetrate the stratum corneum) and functionally (by the ability to accurately sense ISF glucose). The derived ISF glucose levels will be compared with simultaneous venous glucose samples (YSI) and with a commercially available CGM device (iPro2, Medtronic). Assessment of microprobe penetration of the stratum corneum will be performed using confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography and in skin biopsies.

oPhase 4 aims to assess efficacy of the device as a primary outcome and safety as a secondary outcome. This will be in subjects with type 1 diabetes over 5 days in ambulatory situation. Efficacy will be assessed by comparing microprobe sensor derived ISF glucose levels against ISF glucose levels measured using a commercially available CGM device (iPro2, Medtronic).


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 36 participants
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Official Title: Clinical Assessment of a Novel Microprobe Array Continuous Glucose Monitor for Type 1 Diabetes
Study Start Date : November 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 2017
Actual Study Completion Date : June 2018

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Diabetes Type 1
Drug Information available for: Dextrose

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Microprobe Glucose Sensor
The microprobe array continuous glucose sensor will be applied to healthy volunteers (in phases 1 and 2) and then to participants with type 1 diabetes (in phases 3 and 4).
Device: Microprobe glucose sensor
Assessment of safety and accuracy of a novel continuous glucose monitor based on microprobe technology.
Other Name: Microprobe Array Continuous Glucose Monitor




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Skin inflammation [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Phases 1 & 2 of the study aims to assess safety of the use of microprobe array continuous glucose sensor with regards to skin inflammation. This will be in healthy volunteers over 6 hours initially (phase 1) then over 24 hours (phase 2). This is a secondary outcome for phases 3 and 4.

  2. Correlation with venous blood glucose & ISF glucose [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    Phases 3 & 4 of the study aim to assess efficacy of the device in people with type 1 diabetes. This will be done in comparison to venous blood glucose and ISF glucose (using Medtronic iPro2 CGM system, Northridge, California) in a controlled environment over 24 hours (phase 3) then compared to ISF glucose in ambulatory situation over five days (phase 4).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Pain score [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    The study aims to assess safety of the device with regards to pain degree in comparison to venflon insertion and insertion of an existing continuous glucose monitor (Medtronic iPro2 CGM system, Northridge, California). This will be done at each phase of the four study phases.

  2. Skin Penetration [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    This will be done using Optical Coherence Tomography and Confocal Microscopy.

  3. Detectable signal [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
    This is a secondary outcome for phases 1 & 2.

  4. Correlation with venous blood glucose [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
    This is a secondary outcome for phases 1 and 2. It is a primary outcome for phase 3.

  5. Magnitude of current [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
  6. Clarke error grid [ Time Frame: 1 year ]
  7. Acceptability questionnaire [ Time Frame: 3 years ]
    This is a secondary outcome for phases 3 and 4.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

For phases 1 and 2:

Inclusion Criteria:

• Adults over 18 years of age

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of upper limb neuropathy or radiculopathy
  • History of pre-existing skin condition
  • Pregnant or planning pregnancy in next 12 months
  • Breastfeeding
  • Enrolled in other clinical trials
  • uncontrolled concurrent illness
  • Have active malignancy or under investigation for malignancy

For phases 3 and 4:

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Adults over 18 years of age.
  • Diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes for greater than 1 year.
  • HbA1c less than or equal to 9.0 % (75 mmol/mol).
  • Registered with a General Practitioner.

Exclusion criteria:

  • History of diabetic dermopathy or pre-existing skin condition
  • History of upper limb neuropathy or radiculopathy
  • Pregnant or planning pregnancy in next 12 months
  • Breastfeeding
  • Enrolled in other clinical trials
  • uncontrolled concurrent illness
  • physical or visual impairment preventing sensor's use
  • Have active malignancy or under investigation for malignancy

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01908530


Locations
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United Kingdom
Imperial College London
London, United Kingdom, W2 1PG
Sponsors and Collaborators
Imperial College London
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Desmond Johnston, PhD, FRCP Professor of Diabetes & Endocrinology - Imperial College London

Publications:
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Responsible Party: Imperial College London
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01908530     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 13SM0639
First Posted: July 25, 2013    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 2, 2018
Last Verified: March 2018

Keywords provided by Imperial College London:
Diabetes,Continuous Glucose Monitoring,Microprobes

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
Glucose Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Endocrine System Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases
Immune System Diseases