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Coadministration of Measles-rubella and Rotavirus Vaccines

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01700621
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 4, 2012
Results First Posted : February 18, 2019
Last Update Posted : March 13, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
PATH

Brief Summary:
The investigators aim to establish the non-inferiority of concomitant administration of measles-rubella and rotavirus vaccines to measles-rubella vaccine given alone in terms of measles seroconversion rates. The primary study hypothesis is the measles seroconversion rate as defined by the percentage of children seroconverting to measles with a measles serum antibody concentration of >=1:120 at 8 weeks post vaccination after the concomitant administration of measles-rubella and rotavirus vaccines is non-inferior to that obtained when measles-rubella vaccine is given alone in children 9 months of age who have received a primary rotavirus vaccine series with the first dose between 6 and 10 weeks and the second at least 4 weeks later and are seronegative for measles antibody in the pre-vaccination sample.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Measles Antibody Seroconversion Rubella Antibody Seroconversion Rotavirus Geometric Mean Titer (GMT) Rotavirus Immunoglobulin A (IgA) Seropositivity Biological: Rotarix vaccine Biological: measles-rubella vaccine Phase 4

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 482 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Non-interference and Safety of Concomitant Administration of Measles-rubella and Rotavirus Vaccines at 9 Months of Age in Rural Bangladesh
Study Start Date : January 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 2013
Actual Study Completion Date : September 2013

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Measles Rubella

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: measles-rubella and rotavirus vaccines
receive one 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of live attenuated measles-rubella vaccine and one 1.0 ml dose of oral Rotarix vaccine at 9 months of age
Biological: Rotarix vaccine
one 1.0 ml dose of oral rotavirus vaccine at 9 months of age
Other Name: rotavirus vaccine

Biological: measles-rubella vaccine
one 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of live attenuated measles-rubella vaccine
Other Name: Measles-Rubella Virus Vaccine Live US Pharmacopeia (USP)

Active Comparator: measles-rubella vaccine
receive one 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of live attenuated measles-rubella vaccine at 9 months of age
Biological: measles-rubella vaccine
one 0.5 ml subcutaneous dose of live attenuated measles-rubella vaccine
Other Name: Measles-Rubella Virus Vaccine Live US Pharmacopeia (USP)




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percentage/Number of Subjects With Seroprotection for Measles Virus Serum Neutralization Antibodies [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]

    Detected by plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT).

    Seroprotection defined as measles serum antibody concentration >=1:120 8 weeks post vaccination. Assays were standardized using WHO Second International Standard for measles antibody containing 5000 mIU/ml, which enables the 50% neutralizing antibody end-point dose (titer, ND50) of test samples to be transformed to antibody concentrations in terms of mIU/ml. The analytical cut-off value in this assay was ND50 < 1/8; this was the lowest dilution at which sera were tested.


  2. Percentage/Number of Subjects With Seroprotection for Anti-measles Virus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Used commercially available indirect enzyme-linked IgG immunoassays (EIAs; Wampole Laboratories, Princeton, New Jersey). An index standard ratio (ISR) of ≥1.10 on both runs of the respective assay was considered evidence of seropositivity for measles virus. All measles virus and rubella virus assays were performed at the National Measles and Rubella Reference Laboratories, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Herpesviruses Branch, Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, Georgia).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Percentage/Number of Subjects With Seroconversion for Anti-rubella Virus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Used commercially available indirect enzyme-linked IgG immunoassays (EIAs; Wampole Laboratories, Princeton, New Jersey). An index standard ratio (ISR) of ≥1.10 on both runs of the respective assay was considered evidence of seropositivity for rubella virus. An ISR of at least 1.10 represents 10 IU/mL of rubella virus antibody, consistent with a protective level.All measles virus and rubella virus assays were performed at the National Measles and Rubella Reference Laboratories, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Herpesviruses Branch, Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, Georgia).

  2. Geometric Mean Concentration (GMC) for Anti-rubella Virus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Used commercially available indirect enzyme-linked IgG immunoassays (EIAs; Wampole Laboratories, Princeton, New Jersey). An index standard ratio (ISR) of ≥1.10 on both runs of the respective assay was considered evidence of seropositivity for rubella virus. An ISR of at least 1.10 represents 10 IU/mL of rubella virus antibody, consistent with a protective level.All measles virus and rubella virus assays were performed at the National Measles and Rubella Reference Laboratories, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Herpesviruses Branch, Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, Georgia).

  3. Percentage/Number of Subjects Seropositive for Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin A (IgA) [ Time Frame: Visit 1 (pre-vaccination) and 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. A subject was considered seropositive if the IgA or IgG rotavirus antibody concentration was ≥20 U/mL.

  4. Geometric Mean Titer (GMT) of Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin A (IgA) [ Time Frame: Visit 1 (pre-vaccination) and 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. Rotavirus IgA and IgG values of <20 U/mL are converted to 10 U/mL for calculation purposes.

  5. Percentage/Number of Subjects Seropositive for Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: Visit 1 (pre-vaccination) and 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. A subject was considered seropositive if the IgA or IgG rotavirus antibody concentration was ≥20 U/mL.

  6. Geometric Mean Titer (GMT) of Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: Visit 1 (pre-vaccination) and 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. Rotavirus IgA and IgG values of <20 U/mL are converted to 10 U/mL for calculation purposes.

  7. Percentage/Number of Subjects With Seroconversion for Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin A (IgA) [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. A subject was considered seropositive if the IgA or IgG rotavirus antibody concentration was ≥20 U/mL.

  8. Percentage/Number of Subjects With Seroconversion for Anti-rotavirus Immunoglobulin G (IgG) [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Antirotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at the Laboratory of Specialized Clinical Studies at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati, Ohio). A standard serum pool was used to determine arbitrary units of rotavirus IgA or IgG in each sample. A subject was considered seropositive if the IgA or IgG rotavirus antibody concentration was ≥20 U/mL.

  9. Number/Percentage of Subjects Experiencing Immediate Post-vaccination Reactions Following Administration of Vaccine [ Time Frame: 30 minutes post-vaccination ]
    Immediate reactogenicity was defined as local or systemic reactions occurring directly and up to 30 minutes after vaccine receipt, with an emphasis on allergic reactions.

  10. Number/Percentage of Subjects Experiencing Solicited Adverse Events [ Time Frame: 14 days post-vaccination ]
    Solicited non-serious adverse events were collected based on recall at study visits 2 (Day 4) through 5 (Day 14) following administration of Rotarix® vaccine. They included diarrhea, fever, vomiting, loss of appetite, irritability, and intussusception. Adverse events were graded for severity and relationship to vaccine.

  11. Number/Percentage of Subjects Experiencing Unsolicited Non-serious Adverse Events [ Time Frame: 14 days post-vaccination ]
    Solicited non-serious adverse events were collected based on recall at study visits 2 (Day 4) through 5 (Day 14) following administration of Rotarix® vaccine. Adverse events were graded for severity and relationship to vaccine.

  12. Number/Percentage of Subjects Experiencing Serious Adverse Events [ Time Frame: 2 months after vaccination ]

    An adverse event (AE) or suspected AE was considered "serious" if it resulted in any of the following outcomes:

    • Death
    • A life-threatening AE (the term "life-threatening" in the definition of "serious" refers to an event in which the patient was at risk of death at the time of the event; it does not refer to an event which hypothetically might have caused death if it were more severe)
    • Inpatient hospitalization or prolongation of existing hospitalization
    • A persistent or significant incapacity or substantial disruption of the ability to conduct normal life functions

    Important medical events that may not result in death, be life threatening, or require hospitalization would have been considered severe adverse events when, based upon appropriate medical judgment, they may have jeopardized the participant and may have required medical or surgical intervention to prevent one of the outcomes listed in this definition.



Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Geometric Mean Concentration (GMC) for Measles Virus Serum Neutralization Antibodies [ Time Frame: 8 weeks post vaccination ]
    Sera were analyzed for the presence of measles virus serum neutralizing antibodies (SNAs), using a standardized plaque reduction neutralization (PRN) assay, in which PRN titers, defined as the serum dilutions that reduced the number of plaques by 50%, were calculated using the Kärber method [12]. A 1:100 dilution of World Health Organization (WHO) Second International Standard Anti-Measles Serum (IS, coded 66/202, supplied by the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, South Mimms, United Kingdom) was tested in parallel with each serum specimen to calculate the reciprocal of the 50% end point titer determined by the PRN test.

  2. Number of Participants With Rotavirus Vaccine Shedding [ Time Frame: Day 0, Day 4 and Day 7 ]
    Based on 5 grams of stool sample. Vaccine shedding defined as presence of vaccine-type rotavirus in stool at 4 (+/-1) and/or 7 (+/-1) days post rotavirus vaccination detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and typed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   9 Months to 11 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Child 9 months of age eligible for measles-rubella vaccination
  • documented evidence of a primary rotavirus vaccine series with first dose between 6 and 10 weeks of age and second dose at least 4 weeks after first dose
  • healthy infants free of chronic or serious medical condition as determined by history and physical examination at time of study enrollment
  • parents/guardians of each participant are able to understand and follow study procedures and agree to participate in study by providing signed informed consent

Exclusion Criteria:

  • hypersensitivity to any component of measles-rubella or Rotarix vaccine which would preclude administration of the vaccine
  • history of intussusception, intestinal malformations, or abdominal surgery
  • known history of measles and/or rubella disease
  • history of previous receipt of measles and/or rubella vaccine
  • use of any immunosuppressive drugs or immunoglobulin and/or blood products since birth or anticipated during study period
  • current enrolment in any other intervention trial or use of any investigational drug or vaccine throughout the study period
  • any participant who reports planning to leave the study area before the completion of the study
  • acute diarrhea (defined as ≥3 loose stools within a 24-hour period) or vomiting (defined as projectile vomiting or any vomiting at the discretion of the clinician) at the time of enrollment or within the last 24 hours
  • acute febrile illness (defined as a temperature of ≥38°C) at the time of enrollment.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01700621


Locations
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Bangladesh
ICDDR,B
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Sponsors and Collaborators
PATH
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: K Zaman, PhD, MPH International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: PATH
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01700621     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: HS677
First Posted: October 4, 2012    Key Record Dates
Results First Posted: February 18, 2019
Last Update Posted: March 13, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Keywords provided by PATH:
rotavirus
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Measles
Rubella
Morbillivirus Infections
Paramyxoviridae Infections
Mononegavirales Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Virus Diseases
Rubivirus Infections
Togaviridae Infections
Vaccines
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs