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Community Self-help Using Thought Field Therapy in a Traumatised Population in Uganda: a Randomised Trial

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT01681628
First Posted: September 10, 2012
Last Update Posted: May 1, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
Thought Field Therapy Foundation.
Mats Uldal Humanitarian Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Robert Howard Robson, Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd
  Purpose

Thought Field Therapy (TFT) is a simple technique that involves tapping on points of the body corresponding to the meridians used in acupuncture. By using specific sequences, TFT can be used to treat a variety of psychological problems. Patients can be taught to treat themselves, and lay people can be trained to treat others in their community, as has been shown for narrative exposure therapy.

Thought Field Therapy has been used to treat whole communities who have suffered psychological trauma following natural disasters and violent conflicts. In these circumstances, TFT can be used as a stand-alone therapy, or as an adjunct to other psychological therapies, by removing the pain of re-living the traumatic events.

Studies in Rwanda have shown that individuals within a community can be treated with brief TFT sessions. Both short-term and longer-term improvements in scores of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) measurement scales have been demonstrated.

The Kasese District in Uganda has suffered from factional conflicts and the consequences of the ongoing struggles in neighbouring countries for many years. Although the government has controlled the situation and secured the borders, many are still haunted by the psychological consequences.

The purpose of the study is to validate the model of addressing widespread psychological trauma following conflict by training community leaders to help others in their community using TFT.

Thirty-six community leaders will be given a two-day training in algorithm level trauma-relief TFT. They will then treat 128 volunteers for their traumas, using TFT, who will be assessed before and one week after treatment by the post-traumatic stress disorder check-list questionnaire for civilians (PCL-C). As a control, a further 128 volunteers will join a wait-list group, who will be assessed at the same time, but treated later.

PCL-C scores before and after treatment will be compared with the wait-list group scores before and after waiting, but before their treatment.

A follow-up assessment of the participants will be undertaken 1 to 2 years later.


Condition Intervention
Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Behavioral: Thought Field Therapy.

Study Type: Interventional
Study Design: Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy Provided by Newly Instructed Community Workers to a Traumatized Population in Uganda: A Randomised Trial

Resource links provided by NLM:


Further study details as provided by Robert Howard Robson, Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd:

Primary Outcome Measures:
  • Change in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Check List for Civilians (PLC-C) Score. [ Time Frame: Baseline (Time 1), One week later (Time 2) and Two weeks later (Time 3 for Wait-list: Thought field Therapy Arm) ]

    PCL-C (post traumatic check list for civilians) is a measure of the severity of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and can also be used for screening populations, It is a self-completed questionnaire with 17 questions scoring from 1 - 5. The scores of each question are added to create the total score for each participant. The highest possible score for any individual is 85, the lowest score being 17. A diagnostic score for PTSD is accepted as being more than 50. Participants completed the PCL-C just before treatment and one week later. The wait list group received no treatment at Time 1.

    In the treatment arm, measure immediately pre-treatment (baseline) (time 1) and one week later (time 2).

    In the wait-list no therapy arm, measure at baseline (time 1), and after one week (no treatment) (time 2). The wait-list group (Thought Field Therapy group) were then treated and reassessed after a further week (time 3).



Secondary Outcome Measures:
  • Percentage With Scores Diagnostic for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PCL-C > 50) Before and After Treatment in Treatment and Control Groups. [ Time Frame: Baseline (Time 1), One week later (Time 2) and Two weeks later (Time 3 for Wait-list: Thought field Therapy Arm) ]
    PCL-C (post traumatic check list for civilians) is a measure of the severity of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and can also be used for screening populations, It is a self-completed questionnaire with 17 questions scoring from 1 - 5. The scores of each question are added to create the total score for each participant. The highest possible score for any individual is 85, the lowest score being 17. A diagnostic score for PTSD is accepted as being more than 50. Participants completed the PCL-C just before treatment and one week later. The wait list group received no treatment at Time 1.


Enrollment: 256
Study Start Date: June 2012
Study Completion Date: January 2014
Primary Completion Date: July 2012 (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Arms Assigned Interventions
Experimental: Thought Field Therapy
Thought Field Therapy delivered by trained community leaders.
Behavioral: Thought Field Therapy.
Thought Field Therapy is a meridian based therapy, where clients tap on specific parts of their body, according to a particular protocol. This does not obliterate the memory of the trauma, but relieves the associated distress.
Wait list

Delayed intervention.

No intervention prior to assessment after one week (pre-test 2). Then treated with Thought Field Therapy, and re-assessed after a further week (post-test).

Behavioral: Thought Field Therapy.
Thought Field Therapy is a meridian based therapy, where clients tap on specific parts of their body, according to a particular protocol. This does not obliterate the memory of the trauma, but relieves the associated distress.

  Show Detailed Description

  Eligibility

Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Volunteers recruited from local communities, who feel that they are suffering from psychological trauma.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Minimum age
  Contacts and Locations
Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT01681628


Locations
Uganda
St Augustine's Catechist Training Centre, PO Box 155
Kasese, Uganda
Sponsors and Collaborators
Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd
Thought Field Therapy Foundation.
Mats Uldal Humanitarian Foundation
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Robert H Robson, MA MB BChir Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd
  More Information

Additional Information:
Publications:
Dunnewold AL. Thought Field Therapy efficacy following large scale traumatic events. Current Research in Psychology 5: 34-39, 2014. DOI: 10.3844/crpsp.2014.34.39
Robson RH, Robson PM, Ludwig R, Mitabu C, Phillips C. Effectiveness of Thought Field Therapy Provided by Newly Instructed Community Workers to a Traumatized Population in Uganda: A Randomized Trial. Current Research in Psychology http://thescipub.com/PDF/ofsp.10454.pdf, 2016.
Callahan RJ. Tapping the healer within. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, 2001
Feinstein D. Energy psychology in disaster relief. Traumatology 14: 127-129, 2008.
Connolly SM, Roe-Sepowitz D, Sakai C, Edwards J. Utilizing community resources to treat PTSD: randomised controlled study using thought field therapy. African Journal of Traumatic Stress 3: 82-90, 2013.
Feinstein D. Acupoint stimulation in treating psychological disorders. Review of general Psychology 16: 364-380, 2012. doi: 10.1037/a0021171
Stone B, Leyden L, Fellows B. Energy Psychology treatment for post traumatic stress in genocide survivors in a Rwandan orphanage: a pilot investigation. Energy Psychology 1: 73-81, 2009.
Stone B, Leyden L, Fellows B. Energy Psychology treatment for orphan heads of households in Rwanda. Energy Psychology 2: 31-38, 2010.

Responsible Party: Robert Howard Robson, Dr Robert Howard Robson, Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01681628     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Uganda2012
First Submitted: September 2, 2012
First Posted: September 10, 2012
Results First Submitted: May 1, 2016
Results First Posted: May 1, 2017
Last Update Posted: May 1, 2017
Last Verified: March 2017
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: Spreadsheet available on request. Individual paper copies also available.

Keywords provided by Robert Howard Robson, Thought Field Therapy Foundation (UK) Ltd:
Thought Field Therapy.
Post-traumatic stress disorder.
Post-traumatic stress disorder check list for Civilians.
Uganda
Ugandan therapists.
Community treatment.

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Stress Disorders, Traumatic
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic
Trauma and Stressor Related Disorders
Mental Disorders